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United States Ambassadors Security

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February 1, 1996 | Associated Press
The United States is pulling all its diplomats and government personnel out of Sudan because they are vulnerable to terrorist attack and the Khartoum government has refused to guarantee their safety, the State Department announced Wednesday night. About 30 U.S. Embassy staff members and their families will depart by commercial airline "over the next few days," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said. About 2,100 U.S. citizens living in Sudan are also being urged to exit.
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NEWS
February 1, 1996 | Associated Press
The United States is pulling all its diplomats and government personnel out of Sudan because they are vulnerable to terrorist attack and the Khartoum government has refused to guarantee their safety, the State Department announced Wednesday night. About 30 U.S. Embassy staff members and their families will depart by commercial airline "over the next few days," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said. About 2,100 U.S. citizens living in Sudan are also being urged to exit.
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NEWS
November 14, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Embassy in Cairo, the largest American diplomatic structure in the world, dominates this dusty city's horizon. Two stone towers cover a full block, dwarfing the surrounding villas, university campus and government offices. They seem to symbolize American might. But the embassy, secured far behind an 8-foot-high concrete wall on streets where parking is banned and heavily armed police patrol, also proclaims American vulnerability.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Embassy in Cairo, the largest American diplomatic structure in the world, dominates this dusty city's horizon. Two stone towers cover a full block, dwarfing the surrounding villas, university campus and government offices. They seem to symbolize American might. But the embassy, secured far behind an 8-foot-high concrete wall on streets where parking is banned and heavily armed police patrol, also proclaims American vulnerability.
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