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May 27, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA
Irvine will be the first stop on a three-city tour of U.S. ambassadors to Southeast Asian nations. The purpose of the tour, which arrives at the Hyatt Regency Irvine on June 2, is to stimulate U.S. trade with the seven members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations: Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA
Irvine will be the first stop on a three-city tour of U.S. ambassadors to Southeast Asian nations. The purpose of the tour, which arrives at the Hyatt Regency Irvine on June 2, is to stimulate U.S. trade with the seven members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations: Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of American ambassadors to Southeast Asian capitals has come home to sound the alarm: U.S. industry is being outflanked and outsmarted by the competition in Asia, and if it doesn't act soon it will miss strategic opportunities. At stake is more than commercial interest, they suggest. As the U.S. military begins to trim forces in the region and prepares to withdraw from the Philippines, strong economic ties will be essential in maintaining American leadership in Asia.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of American ambassadors to Southeast Asian capitals has come home to sound the alarm: U.S. industry is being outflanked and outsmarted by the competition in Asia, and if it doesn't act soon it will miss strategic opportunities. At stake is more than commercial interest, they suggest. As the U.S. military begins to trim forces in the region and prepares to withdraw from the Philippines, strong economic ties will be essential in maintaining American leadership in Asia.
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