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BUSINESS
September 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The China Telemedia Copyright Verification Assn. has been incorporated in Hong Kong by the China Audio-Video Industry Assn. to protect legal interests and rights of entertainment companies doing business in China. The group's aim is to protect copyrights and develop cooperation on the subject between the United States and China.
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NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Vice President Joe Biden said that the United States and China "hold the key" to the global economy Thursday, the first full day of a visit focused as much on a broader relationship between the two global powers as building a personal relationship with its future leaders. Biden, at the start of a nine-day visit to Asia, said he came with a  dual message - that the United States will continue to be "engaged totally" in the world, and that a close partnership with China "is of the utmost importance.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Action Bars Two Air Carriers: Air China and China Eastern will be barred from the all-cargo market between the United States and China because they thwarted a U.S. carrier's right to operate air cargo service to China, according to a ruling last week by the U.S. Department of Transportation. The DOT was responding to a June 1 complaint from Evergreen International Airlines.
OPINION
February 7, 2010
Walk softly and carry a message of mutual respect. That was the Obama administration's initial approach to China, part of a broad policy of seeking dialogue on difficult issues with friends and enemies alike. In that spirit, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited the People's Republic on her first trip abroad and avoided public expressions of concern about Chinese human rights abuses. President Obama put off meeting China's nemesis, the Tibetan Dalai Lama, ahead of his own foray to China, hoping to focus attention on core U.S. concerns such as nuclear proliferation in Iran and North Korea, trade relations and climate change.
SPORTS
May 8, 1996 | WENDY WITHERSPOON
In one of its final domestic competitions before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, the U.S. women's volleyball team will host China at 7 tonight in the Bren Center. The match is the first of four between the United States and China. The United States was 4-0 against China last year, including a victory in the round-robin World Cup tournament. China placed third in the tournament to qualify for the Olympics.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
At the time, Republican presidential contender Ronald Reagan called it "a shabby, needless blow." His intra-party rival, George Bush, branded it "an abject American retreat." And then-Sen. John Tower (R-Tex.) termed it "unconscionable." Despite such criticism, 10 years ago today, on Jan. 1, 1979, the Jimmy Carter Administration broke formal U.S. ties with Taiwan and established diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China. "We are recognizing a simple reality," President Carter said.
WORLD
November 16, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
By acknowledging over the weekend that the world would have to wait at least until next year for a legally binding treaty to curb global warming, President Obama and fellow Pacific Rim leaders dramatically lowered expectations for next month's climate negotiations in Copenhagen. Yet, in the process, White House officials and many environmentalists say, the leaders may have boosted the chances for the U.S. Congress to pass landmark limits on greenhouse gas emissions -- and for the world to act in time to stave off the worst projected effects of rising temperatures.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Vice President Joe Biden said that the United States and China "hold the key" to the global economy Thursday, the first full day of a visit focused as much on a broader relationship between the two global powers as building a personal relationship with its future leaders. Biden, at the start of a nine-day visit to Asia, said he came with a  dual message - that the United States will continue to be "engaged totally" in the world, and that a close partnership with China "is of the utmost importance.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China on Friday rebuffed the Clinton administration's new initiative for talks on the future of the Korean peninsula by suggesting that the governments in Seoul and Pyongyang will have to work out their own differences before outside powers become involved. Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen also reacted coolly to the upgrading of security ties between the United States and Japan, warning that Washington and Tokyo should not extend their defense cooperation throughout Asia.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been unimaginable only a few years ago. But President Clinton appears to have moved American foreign policy into a close alignment with China, ending the estrangement that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. With their second amicable summit meeting in eight months, with a package of deals and a stunningly warm, earthy news conference, Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin have succeeded, at least for now, in forging a new partnership.
WORLD
November 16, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
By acknowledging over the weekend that the world would have to wait at least until next year for a legally binding treaty to curb global warming, President Obama and fellow Pacific Rim leaders dramatically lowered expectations for next month's climate negotiations in Copenhagen. Yet, in the process, White House officials and many environmentalists say, the leaders may have boosted the chances for the U.S. Congress to pass landmark limits on greenhouse gas emissions -- and for the world to act in time to stave off the worst projected effects of rising temperatures.
OPINION
May 23, 2004 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, contributing editor to Opinion and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, is author most recently of "Power, Terror, Peace and War: America's Grand Strategy in a World at Risk."
It was a dizzying week of Indian politics. The ruling Hindu nationalist party lost power, and the Italian-born widow of Rajiv Gandhi turned down the chance to be prime minister. Short-term, these events were more bad news for the Bush administration. Traditionally, India's Congress Party and its left-of-center allies are suspicious of American power.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense hawks have held their tongues so far about the standoff over the crippled U.S. Navy spy plane, but some are signaling that their silence won't last if the White House yields ground on China's demands to settle the issue. Still delighted to have George W. Bush in the White House, conservative lawmakers who consistently push for a tougher U.S. policy toward China have offered broad support to the administration during the standoff over the EP-3 reconnaissance plane.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | By TYLER MARSHALL,
The United States and China will resume high-level military contacts later this month, the Pentagon said Wednesday, marking one of the final steps toward a resumption of formal contacts broken after the U.S. bombing of Beijing's embassy in Yugoslavia last May. While the planned visit of Chinese army Lt. Gen. Xiong Guangkai to Washington from Jan.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been unimaginable only a few years ago. But President Clinton appears to have moved American foreign policy into a close alignment with China, ending the estrangement that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. With their second amicable summit meeting in eight months, with a package of deals and a stunningly warm, earthy news conference, Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin have succeeded, at least for now, in forging a new partnership.
NEWS
October 30, 1997
President Jiang Zemin: The political disturbance that occurred at the turn of spring and summer in 1989 seriously disrupted social stability and jeopardized state security. Therefore, the Chinese government had to take necessary measures according to law to quickly resolve the matter to ensure that our country enjoys stability and that our reform and opening up proceed smoothly.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1994
The ostrich mentality of American businesses is all too predictable when it comes to placing profits over morality in the international marketplace. In Don Lee's article entitled "Local Firms Say if China Loses, They Do Too" (March 29), the question should be, "Will the American consumer be willing to pay from 10% to 40% more for products manufactured in China, if it could mean a possible improvement in that country's internal police system?" Nobody, not even the Chinese themselves, have denied the human rights dichotomy that exists between the politically correct American republic and the Chinese proletarian dictatorship.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Chinese may soon be wearing "George Bush for President" buttons. According to Chinese officials who have taken part in recent meetings to analyze the American political situation, the current assessment is that from China's point of view, the best candidate for 1988 would be Vice President George Bush. The judgment is based in part on China's belief in the importance of personal contacts; Bush has worked in China and has come here on several official trips.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997 | ROSS TERRILL, Ross Terrill is the author of numerous books, including two biographies, "Mao" and "Madam Mao," which will come out in new, revised editions from Stanford University Press later this year. He is at work on a novel of China
The U.S.-China relationship has known soaring hope and biting fear; no other major relationship in the world has been so passionate. Yet the prosaic truth is that for a century, Beijing-Washington ties have been smooth only when a common enemy loomed; at other times, they have ranged from argumentative to parlous. Now with the death last week of Deng Xiaoping, the giant of post-Mao China, Beijing and its role in the world is once again in question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996
The United States and China have edged back from a full-scale trade war by reaching a new agreement on preventing the theft of American intellectual properties--software, CDs, CD-ROMs, videodiscs and similar products. Under the accord, Beijing will continue its recent crackdown on the flagrant rip-offs. For now, acting U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky has withdrawn the threat of sanctions against $2 billion in Chinese exports to the United States.
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