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NEWS
September 30, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday dismissed one of the five felony charges in the Iran-Contra prosecution of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and opened the door to removing the chief prosecutor in the case. The rulings by U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan significantly lighten the charges against Weinberger and complicate Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh's task by threatening to remove his chief deputy--the most experienced prosecutor remaining on the staff.
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NEWS
September 30, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday dismissed one of the five felony charges in the Iran-Contra prosecution of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and opened the door to removing the chief prosecutor in the case. The rulings by U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan significantly lighten the charges against Weinberger and complicate Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh's task by threatening to remove his chief deputy--the most experienced prosecutor remaining on the staff.
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NEWS
March 14, 1988
Despite last week's guilty pleas from former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane, independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh and his staff have been frustrated by a failure to get the cooperation of key witnesses and vital documentation, the Washington Post reported. Walsh's decision to allow McFarlane to plead guilty to lesser misdemeanors was, in part, dictated by Walsh's belief that he needed McFarlane to be a witness against Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, retired Rear Adm. John M.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush nominated Robert M. Gates to become director of the Central Intelligence Agency last May, Republican lawmakers were quick to dismiss suggestions that old questions about Gates' alleged role in the Iran-Contra scandal might threaten his confirmation. "Iran-Contra is history now," Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) declared confidently. But history, as the Administration discovered last week, has an inconvenient way of repeating itself.
NEWS
August 8, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, working to mend his frayed relations with Congress in the wake of the Iran -contra scandal, tentatively agreed with Senate Intelligence Committee leaders Friday on strict new guidelines for approving secret intelligence missions in foreign countries. The proposed regulations appear to close most of the loopholes that allowed arms sales to Iran to be kept secret from Congress and many top Administration officials for 14 months in 1985 and 1986.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North and Congress' Iran- contra investigators Monday appeared close to breaking the deadlock that has threatened to delay or prevent the testimony of the central figure in the scandal, committee sources said. Under the outlines of a tentative deal, sources said, the investigators would limit the amount and scope of private testimony from the former White House aide before he appears in public.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
When Robert C. McFarlane concludes his testimony before the congressional Iran- contra committees today, he will be followed by two little-known but key figures in the Reagan Administration's effort to funnel secret aid to the Nicaraguan rebels after Congress prohibited official funding of the contras: Gaston J. Sigur Jr. and Robert W. Owen.
NEWS
December 18, 1987
Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak will have talks with President Reagan in Washington next month, government sources said in Cairo. Mubarak last visited the United States in September, 1985. The sources said he shelved plans to visit Washington last February because he was angry over U.S. arms sales to Iran, which damaged American credibility among Arab nations that, like Egypt, support Iraq against Iran in the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and the prosecution in Oliver L. North's Iran-Contra trial defused a bitter confrontation Sunday and agreed to a compromise procedure that would impose more stringent safeguards on classified material that North plans to use in his defense. The agreement was announced in a joint statement by the Justice Department and independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh only a few hours after Chief Justice William H.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
The Iran- contra scandal is shaping up as a crucial factor in the 1988 presidential race, to the detriment of Republican candidates generally and Vice President George Bush in particular. Bush, the front-runner, has suffered the most, political experts agree. In denying any responsibility for the scandal, he has said that he was not involved in the Administration's decisions to sell arms to Iran and divert some of the profits to Nicaragua's rebels.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and the prosecution in Oliver L. North's Iran-Contra trial defused a bitter confrontation Sunday and agreed to a compromise procedure that would impose more stringent safeguards on classified material that North plans to use in his defense. The agreement was announced in a joint statement by the Justice Department and independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh only a few hours after Chief Justice William H.
NEWS
March 14, 1988
Despite last week's guilty pleas from former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane, independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh and his staff have been frustrated by a failure to get the cooperation of key witnesses and vital documentation, the Washington Post reported. Walsh's decision to allow McFarlane to plead guilty to lesser misdemeanors was, in part, dictated by Walsh's belief that he needed McFarlane to be a witness against Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, retired Rear Adm. John M.
NEWS
December 18, 1987
Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak will have talks with President Reagan in Washington next month, government sources said in Cairo. Mubarak last visited the United States in September, 1985. The sources said he shelved plans to visit Washington last February because he was angry over U.S. arms sales to Iran, which damaged American credibility among Arab nations that, like Egypt, support Iraq against Iran in the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
The Iran- contra scandal is shaping up as a crucial factor in the 1988 presidential race, to the detriment of Republican candidates generally and Vice President George Bush in particular. Bush, the front-runner, has suffered the most, political experts agree. In denying any responsibility for the scandal, he has said that he was not involved in the Administration's decisions to sell arms to Iran and divert some of the profits to Nicaragua's rebels.
NEWS
August 8, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, working to mend his frayed relations with Congress in the wake of the Iran -contra scandal, tentatively agreed with Senate Intelligence Committee leaders Friday on strict new guidelines for approving secret intelligence missions in foreign countries. The proposed regulations appear to close most of the loopholes that allowed arms sales to Iran to be kept secret from Congress and many top Administration officials for 14 months in 1985 and 1986.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North and Congress' Iran- contra investigators Monday appeared close to breaking the deadlock that has threatened to delay or prevent the testimony of the central figure in the scandal, committee sources said. Under the outlines of a tentative deal, sources said, the investigators would limit the amount and scope of private testimony from the former White House aide before he appears in public.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush nominated Robert M. Gates to become director of the Central Intelligence Agency last May, Republican lawmakers were quick to dismiss suggestions that old questions about Gates' alleged role in the Iran-Contra scandal might threaten his confirmation. "Iran-Contra is history now," Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) declared confidently. But history, as the Administration discovered last week, has an inconvenient way of repeating itself.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Texas multimillionaire Nelson Bunker Hunt testified Friday before the special federal grand jury investigating the Iran- contra affair. Hunt donated at least $237,500 to a foundation run by Carl R. (Spitz) Channell to help arm the Nicaraguan rebels, records given to investigators show. He declined to discuss his testimony after appearing before the grand jury. Asked if he was a target of the investigation, Hunt replied: "I hope not."
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Texas multimillionaire Nelson Bunker Hunt testified Friday before the special federal grand jury investigating the Iran- contra affair. Hunt donated at least $237,500 to a foundation run by Carl R. (Spitz) Channell to help arm the Nicaraguan rebels, records given to investigators show. He declined to discuss his testimony after appearing before the grand jury. Asked if he was a target of the investigation, Hunt replied: "I hope not."
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
When Robert C. McFarlane concludes his testimony before the congressional Iran- contra committees today, he will be followed by two little-known but key figures in the Reagan Administration's effort to funnel secret aid to the Nicaraguan rebels after Congress prohibited official funding of the contras: Gaston J. Sigur Jr. and Robert W. Owen.
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