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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1989
While the outpouring of political dissent regarding our military actions in Panama is both predictable and desirable, more needs to be said. The liberals, conservatives, Republicans and Democrats have many articulate spokespersons to argue the merits. Who speaks for the American servicemen and women? These professionals lay down their lives in the belief that they are doing so for all of us. They are right. The men and women of the United States Armed Forces are the best-equipped, best-trained, best-educated, and most dedicated group of servants ever assembled to defend and protect the rights of a sovereign nation.
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NEWS
April 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon is considering a resumption of anthrax vaccinations for U.S. troops now that the nation's sole maker of the vaccine has been cleared to resume production. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Monday that he was awaiting a recommendation on how and when to resume an inoculation program. He said the details were being considered by Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who will forward his recommendation to Rumsfeld.
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NEWS
May 13, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Their courtship began in a Jacksonville, Fla., bar a little over a year ago, one of those nights, they recall, when two people caught each other's eye and wound up "dancing the night away." It was a night when Kathleen Mazure was wearing her dancing dress, not her Navy lieutenant's bars, and the last thing on her mind was what Scott Price did for a living. It wasn't until after she had taken Price home with her, in fact, that she found out he was a Marine Corps lance corporal.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | WILLIAM M. ARKIN, TIMES SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
The war isn't over, but already Pentagon and intelligence agency teams are going to Afghanistan for a post-mortem on U.S. weapons and tactics. The Air Force has launched a similar effort, code-named "Enduring Look." Yet neither of these studies, nor any others planned thus far, is set to dig deeply into one of the toughest problems of the war--civilian casualties.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. armed forces have lost more than 100 lives and more than $1 billion in sophisticated aircraft at air shows, flight demonstrations and various publicity events since 1955, an investigation by The Times has disclosed. A list of 115 accidents involving Army, Navy and Air Force aircraft participating in shows and demonstration events was compiled on the basis of more than a dozen inquiries over the past year under the federal Freedom of Information Act.
NEWS
September 19, 1994
Here is the text of President Clinton's announcement Sunday night about Haiti: My fellow Americans, I want to announce that the military leaders of Haiti have agreed to step down from power. The dictators have recognized that it is in their best interest and in the best interest of the Haitian people to relinquish power peacefully, rather than to face imminent action by the forces of the multinational coalition we are leading.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Times staff writer John M. Broder contributed to this story
President Clinton on Monday eased restrictions barring homosexuals from joining the U.S. military, hailing the change as "an honorable compromise," even though it leaves in place powerful tools to investigate gay men and lesbians for possible discharge on a wide range of misconduct findings.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
It was the most unlikely of guest lists. Daniel Ellsberg was there at the chapel at Arlington Cemetery; so was Maj. Gen. Edward Landsdale, the model for "The Ugly American" and the man who helped establish America's initial military presence in Vietnam in the 1950s. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy arrived late, but Joseph Alsop, the columnist who so firmly embodied the voice of America's blue-blood Establishment, was precisely, politely on time. Melvin Laird, the Secretary of Defense, was in attendance.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the third morning of Hell Week, the class of SEAL recruits paddled their rubber dinghies 15 miles. After breakfast, the men swam 400 yards in their uniforms and boots and ran eight miles in the deep sand. Mark Kaldi, a 23-year-old seaman, fainted during the run. "You quit while you passed out," a SEAL instructor told Kaldi, whose face was green. "You know why you passed out? Not enough exercise." Kaldi stared at him blankly and swayed slightly as if he might faint again.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christopher Blackman, 19, of Walla Walla, Wash., is cold, hungry, covered with mud, soaked by sweat and chilly rain, and exhausted both mentally and physically. He has never been happier. He has just endured a 54-hour gut-busting ordeal called "the Crucible," the capper to 12 arduous weeks of Marine Corps boot camp--a regimen that a national commission has suggested the other military branches, which have softened their own training, would do well to emulate.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood executives on Thursday provided details of the entertainment industry's contribution to the war on terrorism: free DVDs and CDs for the troops, morale-boosting shows headlined by the likes of Wayne Newton and a trailer promoting patriotism to be shown in American movie theaters by Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians can send greetings to the nation's armed forces throughout the world by recording brief messages to be broadcast by Voice of America. KABC-AM (790) and the Voice of America are setting up booths at several Southland malls in coming weeks where anyone can record a 15-second message. The messages will be broadcast from Dec. 7 to Jan. 31. The Voice of America reaches 91 million listeners worldwide, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is moving toward asking Congress to rewrite the Endangered Species Act and other laws so military training exercises can be exempted from restrictions to protect sea turtles, desert tortoises, shorebirds and other rare creatures. Military officials have said they would like more flexibility in environmental rules, in large part because of growing friction between those protections and training exercises on California's military bases, including Camp Pendleton, Ft.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presidents have marked the day standing atop the cliffs of Normandy. They have visited the cemeteries in northern France where the soldiers lie buried, and they have walked the once-bloody beaches. On Wednesday, 57 years after D-day, President Bush turned to the little town on the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains that bore the greatest American burden.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's plan to overhaul the military is shaping up as a gradual and protracted effort, rather than the kind of explosive change that many had come to expect, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told lawmakers Wednesday during closed-door briefings. Rumsfeld is still aiming to bring major reform, as President Bush promised during his presidential campaign.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century, the essential gear for the front-line infantry soldier has been a rifle, boots, canteen and helmet. Soon, it may also include a hand-held computer linked to satellites. U.S. military officials believe the system, developed by engineers at TRW Inc.'s research laboratory in Carson, could alter the way wars are fought by giving soldiers unprecedented access to battlefield information.
MAGAZINE
April 25, 1993 | RANDY SHILTS, This article is adapted from "Conduct Unbecoming: Gays and Lesbians in the U.S. Military," copyright 1993 by Randy Shilts, reprinted with permission from St. Martin's Press. Shilts' previous book was "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic." He lives in San Francisco.
Much of the current debate over gays and lesbians in the U.S. armed forces has been entirely irrelevant to the genuine problems posed by excluding them. Opponents of lifting the ban on homosexuals in the military talk incessantly of the problems posed by gays' announcing their sexuality. This betrays an appalling ignorance of how the ban actually functions. Ever since the anti-gay regulations were first enacted in 1943, they created a dilemma for military investigators. How do you find gays?
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
In one of the most closely held U.S. intelligence and military programs of the last decade, the United States has covertly trained counterterrorism squads in dozens of countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The United States has turned to training foreign forces as proxies because of the legal, political and logistical difficulties in deploying its own counterterrorism units overseas.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld signaled his intention to pursue dramatic changes in the way the nation's armed forces are organized, laying out for the first time his plans to overhaul the Pentagon in a private meeting with President Bush, several senior government officials said Thursday. Rumsfeld stopped short of making recommendations about weapon programs during his 90-minute meeting at the White House on Wednesday.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The navigator on the submarine Greeneville testified Tuesday that the captain appeared too impatient to follow normal safety procedures in the moments before the sub collided with a Japanese fishing vessel during a rapid surfacing maneuver done to impress 16 civilian VIPs. "He was definitely going quickly; he wasn't wasting time," Lt. Keith Sloan told a court of inquiry reviewing the Feb. 9 collision that killed nine aboard the trawler Ehime Maru. Even while praising Cmdr. Scott D.
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