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February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
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NEWS
April 28, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld flew into this capital Saturday for a daylong visit, his Chinook helicopter landing on the U.S. Embassy grounds for security reasons and spraying a hail of dust over waiting Afghan military officials. Rumsfeld was coy, however, about reports that members of the U.S. military are involved in anti-terrorist operations across the border in Pakistan, insisting that Washington has no business disclosing such operations. He said only that the U.S.
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NEWS
December 13, 2001 | MEGAN K. STACK and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a day of intense negotiation and heavy bombing, Afghan tribal commanders said Wednesday that they have given hundreds of Al Qaeda fighters a new ultimatum: Climb down from their mountain hide-out, surrender themselves and their weapons and hand over Osama bin Laden, or face further assault. "We want Osama alive," commander Hazrat Ali said. "If they don't give us Osama, we are preparing ourselves for a big offensive."
NEWS
March 30, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. soldier killed in Operation Anaconda this month in Afghanistan may have been hit by fire from an American warplane, in an attack that caused a major setback in the battle, the Pentagon disclosed Friday. The Pentagon also released a report that acknowledges some errors--but largely defends the military's conduct--in a series of "friendly fire" and other "incidents that warranted review" in Afghanistan.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The failure so far to capture Osama bin Laden is forcing the Bush administration to confront the possibility that he may remain at large for some time, a development that could complicate the campaign in Afghanistan and cause political repercussions at home. After weeks of military victories, expectations have been growing in the United States that American forces could soon wrap up their effort in Afghanistan and move triumphantly to other fronts.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | DAVID LAMB and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tribal militiamen wearing sneakers and sandals overran the Al Qaeda terrorists' last bastion in Afghanistan on Sunday after two weeks of fierce fighting but found no trace of Osama bin Laden, commanders said.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a night visiting young troops standing guard in the freezing winter air of Central Asia, Marine Commandant Gen. James Jones was asked what impact the Afghanistan campaign will have on the Corps. He didn't hesitate. The Marines' success here, he said, may finally silence critics who say that the Corps is a fine amphibious assault force but that its combat effectiveness declines drastically when it gets more than a few hundred miles from the beach.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | MEGAN K. STACK and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furious fighting swept the hillsides here Thursday, killing dozens of anti-Taliban soldiers, it seemed likely that fruitless attempts to broker the surrender of besieged Al Qaeda fighters may have done more harm than good.
NEWS
November 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon plans to at least triple the number of U.S. special troops stationed in Afghanistan, part of a substantial broadening of Washington's effort to help opposition fighters take the offensive against the Taliban regime, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Thursday. Flatly denying persistent reports that the Bush administration has held back its support for opposition forces in order to give diplomats time to devise a post-Taliban government, Rumsfeld said U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Arabic-language Al Jazeera television network, which brought Osama bin Laden's threatening videos to the West, has broadcast scenes of jubilation from Afghan cities as the Taliban withdrew and the U.S.-backed Northern Alliance moved in. Like the U.S. press, Arabic newspapers have carried pictures of Afghan women casting off their veils and of men shaving their beards.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As three Afghan men swung their arms and swayed to music once banned by the Taliban, wide-eyed Afghans at a religious fete hosted by a regional warlord watched another landmark event unfold. Among the 400 U.S. and Canadian guests of Kandahar Gov. Gul Agha Shirzai, three female American soldiers rose to mimic the dance, their M-4 rifles bouncing off their swinging hips--this in the conservative birthplace of the Taliban, where many women have yet to doff their head-to-toe burkas.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit demanding that Afghan prisoners at Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba be given access to U.S. courts was dismissed Thursday by a federal judge in Los Angeles. U.S. District Judge A. Howard Matz said the civil-rights advocates who brought the habeas corpus action had no relationship with the prisoners and therefore no right to represent them. Moreover, he wrote, U.S. courts lack jurisdiction because the prisoners are being held on Cuban soil over which America has no sovereignty.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. refueling plane crashed into a mountain in Pakistan, killing all seven Marines aboard Wednesday in a day of setbacks for the Pentagon that included the release--despite U.S. protests--of three top Taliban officials by their Afghan captors. As workers made their way toward the wreckage of the KC-130 tanker, witnesses described flames rising from the crash site near Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | KIM MURPHY and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't matter what it was, his buddies said, Nate Chapman wanted to be there. Lending a hand. Doing the hard stuff. "There's a couple times where he'd be halfway dressed, running down the hallway, trying to catch up. You know, he never wanted to be left behind, he always wanted to be right there, willing to help and give a hand," Sgt. 1st Class William Pence said Saturday, fighting back tears as he recalled his Army comrade of 14 years, Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Ross Chapman, the first U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. Army Special Forces soldier was killed Friday in a firefight in eastern Afghanistan, becoming the first U.S. service member slain by enemy action in three months of warfare, Pentagon officials said. The Green Beret was identified as Sgt. 1st Class Nathan R. Chapman, 31, of San Antonio, Texas, the Pentagon said. He was ambushed while on a mission with allied Afghan fighters near Khowst, where Al Qaeda fighters have congregated, officials said.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a week, U.S. officials have been secretly touring opposition-held areas of Afghanistan including the front line north of Kabul, and may have been scouting locations for a military base. The anti-Taliban Northern Alliance refuses to say officially how many U.S. soldiers and civilians are in the territory it controls, or what they are doing beyond assisting airstrikes against Taliban positions. But privately, the alliance acknowledges it has been assisting U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taliban forces in the Afghan cities of Kunduz and Kandahar dug in Thursday for what could be the regime's last conventional battles, even as U.S. Army Gen. Tommy Franks declared that American troops were "tightening the noose" around Taliban leaders and their allies in the Al Qaeda terrorist network.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the hunt for Osama bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar continued Tuesday, American defense officials confirmed that U.S. Marines were helping with "information gathering" at a former Taliban stronghold in southern Afghanistan. The Marines have been "actively doing a search . . . in the Helmand province west of Kandahar," while Special Forces have been working with anti-Taliban soldiers in the region, said Army Col. Rick Thomas at the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as a midnight Mass filled the hangar bay of this enormous aircraft carrier Monday with hymns praising God and prayers calling for peace for all mankind, the deadly business of war was never far away. A space had been cleared for the ecumenical service attended by hundreds of sailors and Marines, including Rear Adm. Jim Zortman, commander of the Stennis battle group.
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