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February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
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NEWS
September 10, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intelligence community warned Thursday that proliferation of medium-range ballistic missiles, driven primarily by sales from North Korea, presents an "immediate, serious and growing threat" to U.S. forces and allies in the Middle East and Asia and has "significantly altered" the strategic balances there.
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NEWS
September 10, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intelligence community warned Thursday that proliferation of medium-range ballistic missiles, driven primarily by sales from North Korea, presents an "immediate, serious and growing threat" to U.S. forces and allies in the Middle East and Asia and has "significantly altered" the strategic balances there.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Korea launched a crude satellite-bearing rocket in August, it was not just a remarkable technological achievement by one of the world's poorest and most isolated nations. The test-firing of the multistage ballistic missile, which disintegrated over the north Pacific, created a political and military fallout that stretched from Tokyo to Washington to Beijing.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | JIM MANN
Behind the scenes, there is a serious debate underway in Washington over the future of the American military presence in Japan and the rest of East Asia. The debate has been propelled by the rape case in Okinawa last fall, in which three U.S. servicemen are awaiting sentencing for an attack on a 12-year-old Japanese schoolgirl, and by the outpouring of anger by Okinawans over that incident. The questions being asked are far-reaching. Does the United States need to keep 100,000 troops in Asia?
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-four years ago, an American soldier named William S. Girard, guarding a machine gun at a U.S. military firing range in central Japan, grew annoyed at impoverished Japanese "brass-pickers" who were scavenging nearby for empty shell casings that they might sell for scrap. Girard tossed out a few empty shell cases to attract the brass-pickers, suddenly ordered them to disperse, then fired an empty shell case from his rifle-grenade launcher toward the fleeing Japanese.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a firm early negotiating posture in talks on the future of two key U.S. military bases in the Philippines, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said Sunday that the Pentagon wants to keep the bases, but only on terms favorable to the United States. Cheney, who is in Honolulu at the start of a two-week visit to Asia, said: "Obviously, we are interested in renewing the base rights agreement, (but) it's only going to happen if both parties can reach acceptable understanding.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a three-day visit to Asia, President Clinton offered Japanese and American audiences a fresh justification for the large U.S. military presence in the Pacific in addresses to the Japanese parliament today and to thousands of whooping, flag-waving service men and women aboard the aircraft carrier Independence.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Korea launched a crude satellite-bearing rocket in August, it was not just a remarkable technological achievement by one of the world's poorest and most isolated nations. The test-firing of the multistage ballistic missile, which disintegrated over the north Pacific, created a political and military fallout that stretched from Tokyo to Washington to Beijing.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will maintain troops "permanently" in Japan and even in a future unified Korea as the core of a forward American presence in Asia, Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Thursday. "Neither our adversaries nor our friends should mistake adjustments in our ground and air forces as a diminishment of U.S. commitment," Perry declared in a news conference here. It was the first time any American official has spoken of keeping U.S. troops in a unified Korea.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a three-day visit to Asia, President Clinton offered Japanese and American audiences a fresh justification for the large U.S. military presence in the Pacific in addresses to the Japanese parliament today and to thousands of whooping, flag-waving service men and women aboard the aircraft carrier Independence.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | JIM MANN
Behind the scenes, there is a serious debate underway in Washington over the future of the American military presence in Japan and the rest of East Asia. The debate has been propelled by the rape case in Okinawa last fall, in which three U.S. servicemen are awaiting sentencing for an attack on a 12-year-old Japanese schoolgirl, and by the outpouring of anger by Okinawans over that incident. The questions being asked are far-reaching. Does the United States need to keep 100,000 troops in Asia?
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will maintain troops "permanently" in Japan and even in a future unified Korea as the core of a forward American presence in Asia, Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Thursday. "Neither our adversaries nor our friends should mistake adjustments in our ground and air forces as a diminishment of U.S. commitment," Perry declared in a news conference here. It was the first time any American official has spoken of keeping U.S. troops in a unified Korea.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-four years ago, an American soldier named William S. Girard, guarding a machine gun at a U.S. military firing range in central Japan, grew annoyed at impoverished Japanese "brass-pickers" who were scavenging nearby for empty shell casings that they might sell for scrap. Girard tossed out a few empty shell cases to attract the brass-pickers, suddenly ordered them to disperse, then fired an empty shell case from his rifle-grenade launcher toward the fleeing Japanese.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a firm early negotiating posture in talks on the future of two key U.S. military bases in the Philippines, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said Sunday that the Pentagon wants to keep the bases, but only on terms favorable to the United States. Cheney, who is in Honolulu at the start of a two-week visit to Asia, said: "Obviously, we are interested in renewing the base rights agreement, (but) it's only going to happen if both parties can reach acceptable understanding.
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