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United States Armed Forces Bangladesh

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NEWS
May 15, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of weary steaming in the Persian Gulf as a decoy for Saddam Hussein's army, a California-based task force of U.S. Marines is finally about to land. But instead of combat, helicopters from the 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade, based at Camp Pendleton, today will begin shuttling food, medicine and communications equipment to remote islands and villages left destitute by the cyclone that ravaged Bangladesh two weeks ago.
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NEWS
May 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of U.S. servicemen and women who brought food, clothing and hope to Bangladeshis who survived a savage cyclone will resume their journey home from the Gulf War today. "Our mission was to save lives. I think we saved a lot--I wish we could have saved more," said Maj. Gen. Henry Stackpole, the commander of Operation Sea Angel. A seven-ship U.S. amphibious task force was diverted to Bangladesh by President Bush to speed relief to an estimated 1.
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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five Blackhawk helicopters launched the U.S. military task force's relief operation to survivors of Bangladesh's devastating cyclone, ferrying American soldiers and bags of rice to Sandwip Island. Most of the island, 10 miles from shore, was inundated by the tidal wave churned up by the April 29-30 cyclone that killed at least 139,000 people. Several thousand American service personnel are to take part in the relief effort expected to last about 30 days.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Another bout of storms killed more than 70 people and injured 1,000 in Bangladesh during the weekend, officials and news reports said Monday. Tornadoes, squalls, rain and floods have plagued the country since April 30, when a cyclone and tidal wave killed at least 139,000 people. More than 215 people have died in storms and floods this month. A 7,000-member U.S.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Another bout of storms killed more than 70 people and injured 1,000 in Bangladesh during the weekend, officials and news reports said Monday. Tornadoes, squalls, rain and floods have plagued the country since April 30, when a cyclone and tidal wave killed at least 139,000 people. More than 215 people have died in storms and floods this month. A 7,000-member U.S.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Marines and Army troops, promising to make contaminated water safe for drinking, arrived Sunday to join the international effort to save cyclone survivors from disease and starvation. According to the latest government figures, the death toll is now 139,138 from the April 30 cyclone and tidal wave that inundated low-lying islands and coastal villages along the Bay of Bengal.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of U.S. servicemen and women who brought food, clothing and hope to Bangladeshis who survived a savage cyclone will resume their journey home from the Gulf War today. "Our mission was to save lives. I think we saved a lot--I wish we could have saved more," said Maj. Gen. Henry Stackpole, the commander of Operation Sea Angel. A seven-ship U.S. amphibious task force was diverted to Bangladesh by President Bush to speed relief to an estimated 1.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mouth was open, but the young girl was speechless when the gray, 90-ton behemoth suddenly roared ashore, spitting water and mud in all directions, and then settled slowly in the muck with a huge hiss. "It is like a mythical monster," she said finally. "It is like nothing I've ever seen." The landing, on a muddy tidal flat, of the first U.S.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mouth was open, but the young girl was speechless when the gray, 90-ton behemoth suddenly roared ashore, spitting water and mud in all directions, and then settled slowly in the muck with a huge hiss. "It is like a mythical monster," she said finally. "It is like nothing I've ever seen." The landing, on a muddy tidal flat, of the first U.S.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five Blackhawk helicopters launched the U.S. military task force's relief operation to survivors of Bangladesh's devastating cyclone, ferrying American soldiers and bags of rice to Sandwip Island. Most of the island, 10 miles from shore, was inundated by the tidal wave churned up by the April 29-30 cyclone that killed at least 139,000 people. Several thousand American service personnel are to take part in the relief effort expected to last about 30 days.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of weary steaming in the Persian Gulf as a decoy for Saddam Hussein's army, a California-based task force of U.S. Marines is finally about to land. But instead of combat, helicopters from the 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade, based at Camp Pendleton, today will begin shuttling food, medicine and communications equipment to remote islands and villages left destitute by the cyclone that ravaged Bangladesh two weeks ago.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Marines and Army troops, promising to make contaminated water safe for drinking, arrived Sunday to join the international effort to save cyclone survivors from disease and starvation. According to the latest government figures, the death toll is now 139,138 from the April 30 cyclone and tidal wave that inundated low-lying islands and coastal villages along the Bay of Bengal.
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