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United States Armed Forces Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
December 13, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The images are haunting still: the twisted wrecks of helicopter gunships shot down in the Oct. 3, 1993, firefight that killed 18 U.S. Army Rangers in Somalia; the charred body of an American soldier paraded through the streets of Mogadishu by a chanting crowd. Vivid even now, they are driving the national debate--leading to today's scheduled vote in the Senate--over President Clinton's plan to send 20,000 U.S. ground troops on a potentially hazardous peacekeeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
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NEWS
November 11, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington's effort to neutralize Bosnian Serb nationalists faces a serious threat today as the party founded by indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic goes into elections well ahead in opinion polls. The Serbian Democratic Party, or SDS, which Karadzic created a decade ago to promote Bosnian Serb nationalism, insists it has nothing more to do with Karadzic. Five years after the end of the Bosnian war, he is still in hiding to escape arrest on charges of genocide and other war crimes.
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NEWS
December 11, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
American flag in hand, the first contingent of U.S. Marines to form part of NATO's Balkan peacekeeping deployment landed here Sunday. As North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops continued to trickle into the region, a French deadline for the Bosnian Serbs to provide information on two missing pilots expired without word on the men's whereabouts. France has threatened retaliation if the Serbs do not answer questions about the fate of the two Frenchmen, who were shot down Aug.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bosnian Serb students pelted U.S. peacekeepers with eggs and stoned Muslim-owned businesses Thursday to press their demand that Bosnian Muslims leave this ethnically tense city. Two people were injured and 10 arrested, Police Chief Dusko Kokanovic said. He urged authorities to declare a state of emergency in Brcko, where the students demonstrated for a third straight day.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside deteriorating weather conditions and flood waters nearing a 100-year high, U.S. Army engineers Friday ended days of frustration and began spanning the fast-moving Sava River with a temporary bridge. The span, more than three football fields in length, is expected to be completed today. If it is, the first U.S. Army truck and troop convoys will begin rolling over the river into Bosnia almost immediately.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a conciliatory gesture to an increasingly skeptical Congress, President Clinton said Friday that he will seek the approval of the lawmakers before sending U.S. troops to enforce peace in Bosnia. "I would welcome, encourage and at the appropriate time request an expression of support by Congress promptly after a peace agreement is reached," Clinton said in a letter to Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.).
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. soldier was killed Saturday when he apparently triggered a land mine while stationed at a checkpoint in a northern Bosnian town. He was the first American to die during the international peacekeeping mission in the Balkans. His death came as Secretary of State Warren Christopher visited the region to urge Bosnia's former warring factions to abide by the terms of their U.S.-brokered peace accord. Christopher heralded the "excellent" progress in complying with the accord.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council cleared the last legal obstacle Friday for President Clinton's dispatch of American troops to Bosnia, but the U.N. body acted only after a startling and bitter clash between U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright and Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. In the confrontation behind closed doors, Boutros-Ghali denounced Albright's criticism of his report on Croatia as shocking in its "vulgarity."
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost six days, the downed pilot coolly hid in Bosnian Serb territory, living on bugs, rainwater and hope. Then, before dawn Thursday, as his strength ebbed, he directed his own rescue. Wringing wet, filthy and hungry, he exploded in a run from the forest in Bosnia-Herzegovina, waving his pistol, sprinting as if the devil were behind him. He flopped onto the welcoming floor of a U.S. Marine helicopter with a whoosh of relief and tears in his eyes. Air Force Capt. Scott F.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a cold, gray sky, the first main combat elements of the U.S. Army rumbled into Bosnia-Herzegovina on Sunday, crossing the flooded Sava River on a pontoon bridge that Army engineers had struggled for days to get into place. "This is another step, another chapter in history," said Lt. Col. Greg Stone, commander of the 1st Cavalry's 1st Squadron--the first unit to cross the temporary bridge from Croatia into Bosnia to begin enforcing the Dayton, Ohio, peace accord.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
International peacekeepers have arrested a Bosnian Serb detention camp commander, more than five years after the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal accused him of raping, torturing and killing Muslims. Dragan Nikolic, 42, is one of the first suspects indicted by the U.N. court. He was brought to the tribunal's detention facility here early Saturday, a day after North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops detained him in the U.S.-controlled sector of northern Bosnia. The Nov.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
An international decision to take sole control of this strategic northern town from Bosnian Serbs has become final, Bosnia's international overseers said Thursday. In March, American arbitrator Roberts Owen took away sole control from the Bosnian Serb administration and declared Brcko would henceforth be governed jointly by Serbs and the Muslim-Croat Federation. Owen gave the two parties five months to submit counterproposals on the town's status. The deadline was Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | Associated Press
Forensic experts have discovered 36 bodies believed to be those of Muslim victims from the Bosnian war in two mass graves near this capital, media reported Tuesday. The Muslim-Croat experts found 30 bodies Monday in Kiseljak, 20 miles northwest of Sarajevo, according to the Sarajevo daily Vecernje Novine. The experts said the victims were probably killed in the summer of 1993 during clashes between Muslims and Croats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1999 | GREG HAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An American wearing a Kevlar helmet and flak vest hands an 8-foot sheet of corrugated roofing to another similarly dressed sailor on a snow-covered roof. The man on the roof slips slightly, but catches his balance. He, in turn, hands the sheet to two sailors in battle dress who lay the roofing and hammer it in place, causing small explosions of snow to fall to the ground. The current mission of the Seabees' Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 40 is to assemble corrugated roofs on classrooms.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO troops on Wednesday made their biggest move yet against Balkan war crimes suspects, arresting a commander of a Bosnian Serb unit accused of massacring several thousand Muslims. In the summer of 1995, Gen. Radislav Krstic helped lead the notorious Drina Corps into the U.N. "safe haven" of Srebrenica, where more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys disappeared after the enclave was overrun. The Srebrenica massacre has been called the worst atrocity in Europe since World War II.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
U.S. military personnel in the Persian Gulf and Balkans interrupted their duties just long enough Thursday to enjoy a holiday meal and write home. "It doesn't make a difference whether it is Thanksgiving or Christmas when you are in a war zone," said Petty Officer Joe Sprague of Hornell, N.Y., stationed aboard the aircraft carrier Enterprise in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton formally offered Thursday to send up to 20,000 U.S. ground troops to help evacuate the U.N. peacekeeping force in Bosnia-Herzegovina if the allies decide to withdraw in the face of increased harassment and hostage-taking by nationalist Serbian forces there. Pentagon officials said the United States would probably supply between 40% and 50% of an allied evacuation force of up to 45,000 troops. The U.S.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, the first U.S. casualty of the peacekeeping mission in the Balkans is lucky to be alive. The wounded soldier, Spc. Martin John Begosh, 23, of Rockville, Md., was recovering Sunday at a U.S. mobile military hospital near here after his Humvee hit a land mine a day earlier while he was on patrol in northern Bosnia-Herzegovina. "It could have been a lot worse," one military expert who examined the site said Sunday. "It's almost a miracle that he survived."
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted Thursday to increase a military pay raise and to require that the president consult with Congress before involving U.S. military forces in Kosovo. Senators rejected a move to force a reduction in troops in Bosnia and added a $1.9-billion emergency fund to support troops in Bosnia as part of a $252-billion defense appropriation. Military pay would go up 3.6% next year, rather than the 3.1% approved last month by the House, under an amendment to the defense bill.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration told Congress on Wednesday that withdrawal of U.S. and other NATO troops from Bosnia-Herzegovina will hinge on "benchmarks" such as the restructuring of the police, the peaceful return of refugees to their prewar homes and the surrender of indicted war crimes suspects for trial. A senior administration official declined to predict how long the troops will have to stay but conceded that those goals won't be met quickly.
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