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July 12, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military authorities of Haiti, defying the international community once again, Monday ordered the expulsion within 48 hours of all human rights observers of the United Nations and the Organization of American States. "The reasons are quite obvious," Dante Caputo, the chief U.N. official for Haiti, said at U.N. headquarters in New York. "They kill people. They torture people. They rape people. And they don't want any witnesses in their country."
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NEWS
August 31, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration won rhetorical backing from Caribbean republics Tuesday for an invasion of Haiti but came away virtually empty-handed in its attempt to sign up allies for military action to restore ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power. "Our governments are equally united in their determination to take all necessary means to carry out the (U.N.
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NEWS
July 7, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groping for a message that would impress Haiti's military leaders without frightening Congress and the American public, the Clinton Administration warned Wednesday that unless the Caribbean nation's rulers step aside before the year's end, the United States will force them out, possibly by an invasion. "We don't expect the military regime to be there six months from now," said William H. Gray III, President Clinton's special envoy to Haiti.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Powerful Democratic senators warned the Clinton Administration on Thursday against an invasion of Haiti to topple the military regime there, drawing new assurances from officials that no military action is imminent. At the same time, the Senate on Thursday rejected a Republican effort to restrain the President from ordering military action in Haiti.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian officials Sunday accused the Bush Administration of initiating a naval and air blockade of Colombia and refused to take part in American drug-interdiction patrols off the Colombian coast. Angered by Washington's unilateral decision to dispatch a flotilla of warships for anti-drug patrols off the Colombian coast, the officials complained that they had not been consulted.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration slammed the door on Haitian refugees Tuesday, announcing that those picked up at sea no longer will be allowed into the United States under any circumstances but will be sent instead to camps in Panama and elsewhere in the Caribbean.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furor mounted in Colombia on Monday over the prospect of increased U.S. naval activity in the Caribbean, the Bush Administration backed away from a plan to send two warships to intercept drug traffic off the Colombian coast. U.S. officials denied that the Bush Administration was planning a naval and air blockade of Colombia, as some Colombians charged. "We are not considering a blockade, only the interdiction of drug traffickers," State Department spokesman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Powerful Democratic senators warned the Clinton Administration on Thursday against an invasion of Haiti to topple the military regime there, drawing new assurances from officials that no military action is imminent. At the same time, the Senate on Thursday rejected a Republican effort to restrain the President from ordering military action in Haiti.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed deployment of Navy warships off Colombia has further strained inter-American relations and complicated the drug war, the Bush Administration acknowledged Tuesday. At the same time, U.S. relations with Peru suffered a strain after U.S. troops surrounded a Peruvian diplomat's residence in Panama City. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said U.S. officials are providing assurances to Latin American leaders that the two incidents do not signal an increased U.S.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration won rhetorical backing from Caribbean republics Tuesday for an invasion of Haiti but came away virtually empty-handed in its attempt to sign up allies for military action to restore ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power. "Our governments are equally united in their determination to take all necessary means to carry out the (U.N.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military authorities of Haiti, defying the international community once again, Monday ordered the expulsion within 48 hours of all human rights observers of the United Nations and the Organization of American States. "The reasons are quite obvious," Dante Caputo, the chief U.N. official for Haiti, said at U.N. headquarters in New York. "They kill people. They torture people. They rape people. And they don't want any witnesses in their country."
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groping for a message that would impress Haiti's military leaders without frightening Congress and the American public, the Clinton Administration warned Wednesday that unless the Caribbean nation's rulers step aside before the year's end, the United States will force them out, possibly by an invasion. "We don't expect the military regime to be there six months from now," said William H. Gray III, President Clinton's special envoy to Haiti.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration slammed the door on Haitian refugees Tuesday, announcing that those picked up at sea no longer will be allowed into the United States under any circumstances but will be sent instead to camps in Panama and elsewhere in the Caribbean.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed deployment of Navy warships off Colombia has further strained inter-American relations and complicated the drug war, the Bush Administration acknowledged Tuesday. At the same time, U.S. relations with Peru suffered a strain after U.S. troops surrounded a Peruvian diplomat's residence in Panama City. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said U.S. officials are providing assurances to Latin American leaders that the two incidents do not signal an increased U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furor mounted in Colombia on Monday over the prospect of increased U.S. naval activity in the Caribbean, the Bush Administration backed away from a plan to send two warships to intercept drug traffic off the Colombian coast. U.S. officials denied that the Bush Administration was planning a naval and air blockade of Colombia, as some Colombians charged. "We are not considering a blockade, only the interdiction of drug traffickers," State Department spokesman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian officials Sunday accused the Bush Administration of initiating a naval and air blockade of Colombia and refused to take part in American drug-interdiction patrols off the Colombian coast. Angered by Washington's unilateral decision to dispatch a flotilla of warships for anti-drug patrols off the Colombian coast, the officials complained that they had not been consulted.
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