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United States Armed Forces Central America

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January 9, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, entering the affirmative action fray again, said Monday it would decide whether the federal government may give blacks, Latinos or women special preferences in the awarding of licenses or contracts. Last year, the court's conservative majority put strict new limits on the use of affirmative action in the awarding of city and state contracts.
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NEWS
July 9, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1990s, the U.S. presence in Central America faded like the paint that demonstrators had sprayed on walls during the previous decade: "Yankee Go Home." The Cold War ended; the leftist guerrillas that Americans had helped fight signed peace agreements and turned themselves into political parties. The isthmus was no longer of much military interest. Now the Yankees are back. In what critics call a militarization of the drug war, U.S.
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NEWS
October 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis, who attempted to use his power as governor of Massachusetts to block a National Guard training mission in Central America, lost an appeal Tuesday challenging federal authority over the Guard. The U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals issued a one-sentence order affirming a decision by U.S. District Judge Robert Keeton on May 6 that upheld federal supremacy over the Guard.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, entering the affirmative action fray again, said Monday it would decide whether the federal government may give blacks, Latinos or women special preferences in the awarding of licenses or contracts. Last year, the court's conservative majority put strict new limits on the use of affirmative action in the awarding of city and state contracts.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1990s, the U.S. presence in Central America faded like the paint that demonstrators had sprayed on walls during the previous decade: "Yankee Go Home." The Cold War ended; the leftist guerrillas that Americans had helped fight signed peace agreements and turned themselves into political parties. The isthmus was no longer of much military interest. Now the Yankees are back. In what critics call a militarization of the drug war, U.S.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis, who attempted to use his power as governor of Massachusetts to block a National Guard training mission in Central America, lost an appeal Tuesday challenging federal authority over the Guard. The U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals issued a one-sentence order affirming a decision by U.S. District Judge Robert Keeton on May 6 that upheld federal supremacy over the Guard.
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