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United States Armed Forces Colombia

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August 21, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh on Sunday praised Colombia's new willingness to extradite drug criminals to the United States and said that the Bush Administration has not ruled out sending U.S. troops to that country to assist in its war on narcotics traffickers, if such help is requested. "I think we have to look at any request that we get for either law enforcement or military assistance seriously," he said, adding that recent acts of terrorism in Colombia, including Friday's assassination of Sen.
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NEWS
July 25, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING and RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An armada of U.S. and Colombian aircraft searched Saturday for five American servicemen and two Colombians missing on an anti-narcotics flight over guerrilla territory, giving immediacy to concerns about the growing U.S. military role in the world's leading cocaine-producing nation.
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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG and DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writers
Red tape in the United States may delay U.S. extradition proceedings against a millionaire drug money launderer arrested in Colombia, allowing him to go free without charges, American officials said here Tuesday. Meanwhile, Colombian police said late Tuesday that they had arrested five suspects in the Friday assassination of presidential candidate Sen. Luis Carlos Galan, whose death had been blamed on cocaine traffickers. Galan had been an outspoken opponent of the drug-trafficking cartels.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. Army reconnaissance plane on an anti-drug mission in Colombia was missing Friday with five American soldiers and two Colombians aboard, the U.S. military said. The four-engine Dehaviland RC-7 was missing most of Friday. It took off at 1:30 a.m. and was expected to return 7 1/2 hours later, said Army Capt. Chris Yates, a spokesman for the U.S. military's Southern Command in Miami. The U.S.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soldiers and police raided the estates of cocaine barons Monday, seizing aircraft, cars and cattle and bringing the number of people arrested in three days to more than 11,000, authorities reported. One of those arrested Monday was identified as a finance chief of the Medellin drug cartel. The cartel bosses have so far eluded the emergency-rule crackdown, but new raids were being reported hourly across the nation.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Virgilio Barco of Colombia told President Bush by telephone Monday night that U.S. troops are not needed to help him fight drug trafficking in his violence-wracked country, the White House said. Barco indicated that he had read "press speculation about the use of U.S. troops in Colombia," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said in a written statement. He was referring to suggestions by Atty. Gen.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Moving to dispatch newly promised military equipment to Colombia, the Pentagon said Friday that it will deliver two cargo planes, eight attack jets and five helicopters to the beleaguered nation by early next week to use in its war against drug cartels.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
A secret portion of President Bush's anti-drug program authorizes an expanded role for the U.S. military in the drug war in Latin America, the Washington Post reported. A classified national security directive signed by the President includes new rules of engagement that would authorize U.S. Special Forces to accompany local forces on some narcotics patrols, the report said. However, Latin American specialists noted that regional governments are extremely reluctant to request any U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Six U.S. military planes joined the hunt for escaped drug lord Pablo Escobar in the biggest American anti-drug military operation mounted in Colombia, Colombian military sources said. The U.S. aircraft, with sophisticated surveillance equipment, began flying low over the northwestern city of Medellin. Escobar, feared boss of the Medellin cocaine cartel, escaped from a prison near Medellin with nine of his lieutenants last week.
NEWS
September 5, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The terrorism afflicting Colombia intensified again Monday when a man disguised as a soldier fired an automatic rifle indiscriminately at the crowded airport in Medellin, the center of the country's massive drug-production region. Two people died and at least 12 were wounded.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Six U.S. military planes joined the hunt for escaped drug lord Pablo Escobar in the biggest American anti-drug military operation mounted in Colombia, Colombian military sources said. The U.S. aircraft, with sophisticated surveillance equipment, began flying low over the northwestern city of Medellin. Escobar, feared boss of the Medellin cocaine cartel, escaped from a prison near Medellin with nine of his lieutenants last week.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed deployment of Navy warships off Colombia has further strained inter-American relations and complicated the drug war, the Bush Administration acknowledged Tuesday. At the same time, U.S. relations with Peru suffered a strain after U.S. troops surrounded a Peruvian diplomat's residence in Panama City. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said U.S. officials are providing assurances to Latin American leaders that the two incidents do not signal an increased U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furor mounted in Colombia on Monday over the prospect of increased U.S. naval activity in the Caribbean, the Bush Administration backed away from a plan to send two warships to intercept drug traffic off the Colombian coast. U.S. officials denied that the Bush Administration was planning a naval and air blockade of Colombia, as some Colombians charged. "We are not considering a blockade, only the interdiction of drug traffickers," State Department spokesman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian officials Sunday accused the Bush Administration of initiating a naval and air blockade of Colombia and refused to take part in American drug-interdiction patrols off the Colombian coast. Angered by Washington's unilateral decision to dispatch a flotilla of warships for anti-drug patrols off the Colombian coast, the officials complained that they had not been consulted.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The White House asserted Monday that the deployment of U.S. military advisers to Colombia will not become "another Vietnam situation" or lead to a "massive troop buildup" that draws the United States into a shooting war overseas. Acknowledging critics' concerns that American military personnel could become involved in Colombian drug raids, White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said that the 30 advisers are there only to provide training and will let the Colombians do the fighting.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
A secret portion of President Bush's anti-drug program authorizes an expanded role for the U.S. military in the drug war in Latin America, the Washington Post reported. A classified national security directive signed by the President includes new rules of engagement that would authorize U.S. Special Forces to accompany local forces on some narcotics patrols, the report said. However, Latin American specialists noted that regional governments are extremely reluctant to request any U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu suggested Sunday that President Bush would be willing to send U.S. combat troops to Colombia to fight that nation's drug cartels if they are requested by Colombia's president. So far, the United States has agreed to ship $65 million in military hardware and send about 100 American trainers and advisers to the drug-plagued Latin American nation. However, Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas has told Administration officials he does not want U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. Army reconnaissance plane on an anti-drug mission in Colombia was missing Friday with five American soldiers and two Colombians aboard, the U.S. military said. The four-engine Dehaviland RC-7 was missing most of Friday. It took off at 1:30 a.m. and was expected to return 7 1/2 hours later, said Army Capt. Chris Yates, a spokesman for the U.S. military's Southern Command in Miami. The U.S.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
William J. Bennett, the nation's top drug control official, bristled Friday at Democratic charges that President Bush's drug control plan does too little and threatened to resign if Congress makes major changes. "I don't have to have this job," Bennett declared at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing.
NEWS
September 5, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The terrorism afflicting Colombia intensified again Monday when a man disguised as a soldier fired an automatic rifle indiscriminately at the crowded airport in Medellin, the center of the country's massive drug-production region. Two people died and at least 12 were wounded.
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