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January 31, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a move that Western analysts here said has more political than practical importance, the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact nations published Monday for the first time detailed data on their military forces in Europe and their estimates of NATO forces. East Bloc defense ministers said in an accompanying statement that the data shows "rough parity" between the two sides.
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NEWS
January 9, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush, who questioned the extent of the U.S. commitment in Europe during the campaign, sounded more cautious Monday about reducing the American military role there, according to a senior senator. The report by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.
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NEWS
February 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking further savings from the declining Soviet threat, Democratic House and Senate leaders said Sunday that U.S. troop levels in Central Europe should be cut to about 100,000 within a few years, or roughly half the level proposed last week by President Bush. But the suggestion by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) drew immediate fire from President Bush's chief of staff, John H.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | ART PINE and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Mayor Wolfgang Hamberger thinks about the state of relations between Western Europe and the United States, what worries him is not friction over the value of the dollar, trade barriers or who's to blame for not doing what in Bosnia. Nor is it the way American soldiers behaved year after year in this town of baroque churches and gingerbread houses in the countryside 20 miles west of the old Iron Curtain; he insists they handled themselves remarkably well.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Five retired American soldiers are under investigation in an expanding European espionage case involving Clyde Lee Conrad, a former U.S. Army sergeant with access to North Atlantic Treaty Organization secrets, officials confirmed Friday. The other soldiers' names could not be learned immediately.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev is rated more favorably than President Bush in largely Republican Orange County, which handed Bush and Ronald Reagan their greatest margins of victory of any county in the nation in the last three presidential elections. In this bellwether conservative region, The Los Angeles Times Orange County Poll has found signs of new thinking on both foreign and domestic issues.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush, who questioned the extent of the U.S. commitment in Europe during the campaign, sounded more cautious Monday about reducing the American military role there, according to a senior senator. The report by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | ART PINE and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Mayor Wolfgang Hamberger thinks about the state of relations between Western Europe and the United States, what worries him is not friction over the value of the dollar, trade barriers or who's to blame for not doing what in Bosnia. Nor is it the way American soldiers behaved year after year in this town of baroque churches and gingerbread houses in the countryside 20 miles west of the old Iron Curtain; he insists they handled themselves remarkably well.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Over the next few years, U.S. forces in Europe will be trimmed by 64%. May 1945 (European Theater): 3,065,505 1954 (postwar peak): 360,000 September 1989: 340,000 January 1991: 246,000 Projected '95: 150,000 Source: U.S. military
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle called Tuesday for an agreement to end a tariff dispute between Americans and Europeans but declared that it would be "disastrous" to replace the successfully ended Cold War with trade battles between the United States and Europe.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin outlined the new American "two-conflict" strategy to a wide audience of diplomats, political leaders and security specialists here Sunday. After a six-month "start-from-scratch" study, "we concluded that the United States must field military forces that can fight and win two major regional conflicts, and nearly simultaneously," Aspin told the annual meeting of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Military doctors and other medical personnel at American facilities in Europe are refusing en masse to perform abortions, hamstringing efforts to implement a new Clinton Administration policy intended to broaden the military community's access to the controversial procedure. Two days after taking office, President Clinton reversed a ban that, since 1988, has prohibited American military hospitals abroad from providing abortion services to military personnel and their dependents.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl warned Tuesday that the potential instability of Eastern Europe and the republics of the former Soviet Union make it vital to keep American troops in Europe. In a few stark and clear sentences, the German leader offered his explanation to a puzzle troubling many Americans: What is the point of deploying American troops in Europe after the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War?
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Munich and Brussels to Washington, diplomats and politicians are grappling with a nagging question: Now that the Cold War is over, is the long U.S. friendship with Western Europe heading off the track into a future of increasing conflict? Two long-running U.S.-European arguments--one over a worldwide trade pact, the other over the U.S. role in Europe's defense--suddenly combined in recent weeks to create an unexpected case of transatlantic jitters.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle called Tuesday for an agreement to end a tariff dispute between Americans and Europeans but declared that it would be "disastrous" to replace the successfully ended Cold War with trade battles between the United States and Europe.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle arrived here Monday, refusing to comment on the alarm he and a contingent of American politicians created with weekend remarks in Germany that seemingly linked a continued U.S. presence in NATO with Washington's trade dispute with Europe over agriculture subsidies. While Quayle appeared to play down the remarks during a stop in Geneva, "tomorrow" was all he would say as he and his wife Marilyn began a two-day visit here as part of his European tour.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle arrived here Monday, refusing to comment on the alarm he and a contingent of American politicians created with weekend remarks in Germany that seemingly linked a continued U.S. presence in NATO with Washington's trade dispute with Europe over agriculture subsidies. While Quayle appeared to play down the remarks during a stop in Geneva, "tomorrow" was all he would say as he and his wife Marilyn began a two-day visit here as part of his European tour.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Over the next few years, U.S. forces in Europe will be trimmed by 64%. May 1945 (European Theater): 3,065,505 1954 (postwar peak): 360,000 September 1989: 340,000 January 1991: 246,000 Projected '95: 150,000 Source: U.S. military
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Cold War dawned in 1949, Army Gen. John R. Galvin was starting his military career as a private in the Massachusetts National Guard, wielding pick and shovel to help fight a series of forest fires then raging throughout New England. Today, the Cold War is over, and Galvin, who has risen to command all U.S. troops in Europe, says he could be back in the firefighting business--figuratively, at least.
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