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NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military's main Hurricane Andrew relief operations are done and nearly all remaining troops will be pulled out of South Florida this week, their commander said. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will handle remaining duties. Nearly 2,000 people are still in the three remaining tent cities. But officials say 200 to 300 may not qualify for continued temporary housing since many were already homeless before the storm.
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NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military's main Hurricane Andrew relief operations are done and nearly all remaining troops will be pulled out of South Florida this week, their commander said. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will handle remaining duties. Nearly 2,000 people are still in the three remaining tent cities. But officials say 200 to 300 may not qualify for continued temporary housing since many were already homeless before the storm.
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NEWS
September 11, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY and SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Florida's dominant color is now drab olive green. Every neighborhood crawls with soldiers dressed in camouflage. Almost every intersection is staffed by a military police officer directing traffic. The rumble of military trucks goes on around the clock. There was no thunder of advancing armament, no heroic charge.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY and SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Florida's dominant color is now drab olive green. Every neighborhood crawls with soldiers dressed in camouflage. Almost every intersection is staffed by a military police officer directing traffic. The rumble of military trucks goes on around the clock. There was no thunder of advancing armament, no heroic charge.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Federal officials pledged Friday to send soldiers door-to-door in a renewed effort to get victims of Hurricane Andrew out of their severely damaged homes and into tent cities. Dade County officials, meanwhile, gradually lifted nightly curfews ahead of the Labor Day weekend, and residents braced for more rain, which had already caved in roofs and ceilings damaged by the hurricane. "We're trying to convince the people to get out of homes that are dangerous," said Transportation Secretary Andrew H.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good-natured general is once again cracking jokes, relieving the tension in a place that is in dire need of relief. It's Labor Day weekend, well after Hurricane Andrew practically wiped this South Florida city off the map. Maj. Gen. Steven Arnold is worried about coordinating the efforts of thousands of volunteers expected to flock to the area. The mayor, meanwhile, wants to go for a ride in a military helicopter to check the wreckage from above.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered an additional 5,000 troops into Florida on Saturday, and made nearly $300 million available to the two principal federal agencies involved in the relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Andrew. Those troops will bring the total on active duty in southern Florida to 19,400 by the middle of the week, the White House said Saturday night.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American combat and support troops on Tuesday stormed Florida neighborhoods ravaged by Hurricane Andrew, beginning the installation of a structure for the delivery of disaster relief that one senior military officer predicted could become "truly a long-term operation" of recovery. "The object of the exercise is to put a military structure right down into the neighborhoods," said Gen. Gordon Sullivan, the Army chief of staff who is overseeing the effort.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good-natured general is once again cracking jokes, relieving the tension in a place that is in dire need of relief. It's Labor Day weekend, well after Hurricane Andrew practically wiped this South Florida city off the map. Maj. Gen. Steven Arnold is worried about coordinating the efforts of thousands of volunteers expected to flock to the area. The mayor, meanwhile, wants to go for a ride in a military helicopter to check the wreckage from above.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Federal officials pledged Friday to send soldiers door-to-door in a renewed effort to get victims of Hurricane Andrew out of their severely damaged homes and into tent cities. Dade County officials, meanwhile, gradually lifted nightly curfews ahead of the Labor Day weekend, and residents braced for more rain, which had already caved in roofs and ceilings damaged by the hurricane. "We're trying to convince the people to get out of homes that are dangerous," said Transportation Secretary Andrew H.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American combat and support troops on Tuesday stormed Florida neighborhoods ravaged by Hurricane Andrew, beginning the installation of a structure for the delivery of disaster relief that one senior military officer predicted could become "truly a long-term operation" of recovery. "The object of the exercise is to put a military structure right down into the neighborhoods," said Gen. Gordon Sullivan, the Army chief of staff who is overseeing the effort.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered an additional 5,000 troops into Florida on Saturday, and made nearly $300 million available to the two principal federal agencies involved in the relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Andrew. Those troops will bring the total on active duty in southern Florida to 19,400 by the middle of the week, the White House said Saturday night.
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