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NEWS
August 12, 1987
A left-wing Greek terrorist group claimed responsibility for the car-bomb attack that wounded 10 U.S. military personnel and a Greek bus driver Monday near Athens. The urban guerrilla group November 17 said in a statement that the attack was aimed at the U.S military presence in Greece and said it will continue its "revolutionary actions" until U.S. bases in Greece are closed. The November 17 group has claimed responsibility for 11 assassinations in the last 12 years.
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NEWS
March 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful bomb blast killed an American Air Force sergeant in an Athens suburb. Police said the attack bore the hallmarks of the left-wing November 17 guerrilla group. Police identified the dead man as Sgt. Ronald Stewart, 35, who had worked at the U.S. Hellenikon Air Base for five years. The remote-controlled bomb exploded as Stewart walked to his home in the seaside suburb of Glyfada.
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NEWS
March 20, 1988
Four American servicemen were among at least 11 people injured when a bomb exploded in a bar in an Athens suburb. A police spokesman said the bomb destroyed Oscar's, a popular hangout for off-duty American servicemen near the U.S. base at Hellenikon Airport in suburban Glyfada, a seaside suburb 11 miles south of Athens. No individual or group claimed responsibility. The four Americans, as well as five Greeks and two Britons, were treated for cuts and puncture wounds.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | From Reuters
After years of bitter disputes and tough negotiations, the United States and Greece signed a new defense agreement Wednesday allowing American bases to stay in the eastern Mediterranean country. The major installations covered by the agreement are a U.S. Air Force base and a Navy base on the island of Crete and about 20 smaller installations spread across the country.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A left-wing Greek terrorist group Saturday claimed responsibility for a military bus bombing on Friday that injured 16 Americans and two Greeks, and it threatened to strike again. The November 17 organization, blamed for 11 political killings since 1975, issued a rambling, four-page proclamation that was published in the left-wing Athens daily Eleftherotypia. "We hit the Americans because their bases constitute an occupation force in our country. . . .
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful bomb blast killed an American Air Force sergeant in an Athens suburb. Police said the attack bore the hallmarks of the left-wing November 17 guerrilla group. Police identified the dead man as Sgt. Ronald Stewart, 35, who had worked at the U.S. Hellenikon Air Base for five years. The remote-controlled bomb exploded as Stewart walked to his home in the seaside suburb of Glyfada.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | From Reuters
After years of bitter disputes and tough negotiations, the United States and Greece signed a new defense agreement Wednesday allowing American bases to stay in the eastern Mediterranean country. The major installations covered by the agreement are a U.S. Air Force base and a Navy base on the island of Crete and about 20 smaller installations spread across the country.
NEWS
April 25, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
At least sixteen Americans and two Greeks were wounded when a roadside bomb exploded Friday, spraying a military bus carrying U.S. soldiers with shrapnel and debris, police and the U.S. Embassy said. An embassy statement said that 12 of the Americans were military personnel and that the four others were civilians. It said that two of the Americans remained hospitalized while the others were treated for minor injuries and released.
NEWS
March 22, 1988
A previously unknown group has claimed responsibility for a bombing in Athens that wounded 13 people, including four U.S. servicemen, according to Greek police. They said a woman telephoned a left-wing Athens newspaper to claim that Saturday's attack at Oscar's bar was the work of the Revolutionary Popular Solidarity organization and was aimed at Americans "to show solidarity with the people of Palestine and Nicaragua."
NEWS
March 20, 1988
Four American servicemen were among at least 11 people injured when a bomb exploded in a bar in an Athens suburb. A police spokesman said the bomb destroyed Oscar's, a popular hangout for off-duty American servicemen near the U.S. base at Hellenikon Airport in suburban Glyfada, a seaside suburb 11 miles south of Athens. No individual or group claimed responsibility. The four Americans, as well as five Greeks and two Britons, were treated for cuts and puncture wounds.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A left-wing Greek terrorist group Saturday claimed responsibility for a military bus bombing on Friday that injured 16 Americans and two Greeks, and it threatened to strike again. The November 17 organization, blamed for 11 political killings since 1975, issued a rambling, four-page proclamation that was published in the left-wing Athens daily Eleftherotypia. "We hit the Americans because their bases constitute an occupation force in our country. . . .
NEWS
April 25, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
At least sixteen Americans and two Greeks were wounded when a roadside bomb exploded Friday, spraying a military bus carrying U.S. soldiers with shrapnel and debris, police and the U.S. Embassy said. An embassy statement said that 12 of the Americans were military personnel and that the four others were civilians. It said that two of the Americans remained hospitalized while the others were treated for minor injuries and released.
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