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September 27, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Virge. He is 24 and married and will be a father any day now. He loves football and he loves the Marines, and he has a wide smile and eyes as blue-green as the Caribbean. He is also the Marine who fired first--and gave the order for his men to fire too--on a group of Haitian police officers Saturday night in the only violent encounter involving U.S. troops since the military landed a week ago. The clash left 10 Haitian policemen dead. The actions of Lt.
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NEWS
November 15, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than five years and over $2 billion after President Clinton ordered 20,000 U.S. troops to occupy this Caribbean nation--first to "Restore" and then to "Uphold Democracy," as the U.S. operations were named--chaos and violent death remain facts of life in Haiti. Disturbing signs of disintegration abound.
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NEWS
October 8, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Haitian Parliament completed work Friday on a limited bill renewing and slightly expanding the right of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to extend political amnesty to the military forces that overthrew him three years ago. By a 9-1 vote, with one abstention, the Haitian Senate passed a bill already approved Thursday by the Chamber of Deputies. A copy of the provision was sent by fax to Aristide for his signature, and it will become law when it is published here Monday.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A secret deal engineered by President Clinton will send Canadian soldiers to maintain stability in Haiti after U.S. troops withdraw from the nation next month, according to published reports. The arrangement, worked out in the past week by aides to the president and Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien, would commit the U.S. to provide logistic support troops for the Canadians and to dispatch U.S. reinforcements in an emergency, Newsday reported.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | Reuters
U.S. military demolition experts Saturday blew up more than three tons of weapons and ammunition confiscated in Haiti in a disarmament effort, military officials said. Plastic explosives were used to destroy the munitions, including 1,300 mortar rounds, 800 rifle grenades and 1,100 hand grenades, at a remote military target range. Most of the weapons and ammunition were seized at Haitian military weapons depots or during street sweeps and raids, officials said. Some were bought by the U.S.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | Associated Press
The withdrawal of U.S. troops is proceeding ahead of schedule, a military spokeswoman said Saturday as hundreds of soldiers flew home. By next weekend, only 6,000 soldiers will remain in Haiti, Maj. Regina Largent said. The 6,000 will remain through January. After that, an undetermined number of U.S. soldiers will participate in the U.N. force that will take over the mission.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sending a message to Haiti's military leaders that "it's time for them to leave," the U.N. Security Council approved a resolution Sunday permitting the use of force to restore democracy to the Caribbean nation. The 12-0 vote, with China and Brazil abstaining, provides the diplomatic cover for U.S.-led military action long threatened by President Clinton.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. officials have initiated large-scale business negotiations with some of the most powerful and wealthy Haitian supporters of the military overthrow of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, according to Haitian business and political sources. The secret talks came this week at the same time the United States was dismantling the Haitian army and supposedly engineering a new political environment to undermine the power of the same anti-democratic elite. In one case, the sources said, Lt.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a whirlwind two-day tour of Haiti that included an emotional appearance by President Jean-Bertrand Aristide on the streets of the capital, President Clinton's national security adviser said Thursday that there is no specific timetable for withdrawing the U.S. military intervention force from Haiti.
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the border crossing out of isolated, sanctions-bound Haiti opened to Richard Elie this weekend for the first time in months, the well-off Haitian American decided to go shopping. Big time. His list included dozens of high-priced items--from spare parts to high-tech goods--that have been banned from Haiti during its three years under economic sanctions.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The facts in the case of Army Capt. Lawrence Rockwood vs. the United States were never in dispute. Both the defense and prosecution agreed that on Sept. 30, 1994, while serving with U.S. forces in Haiti, Rockwood left his post without authorization, sneaked out of the Army's secured compound and hitched a ride with a Haitian to the national prison in downtown Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | from Associated Press
An Army captain who left his post to investigate reports of human rights abuses at a Haitian prison was found guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer and three other charges Saturday but not guilty of dereliction of duty. Capt. Lawrence Rockwood, a counterintelligence officer with the 10th Mountain Division, was also convicted of failure to report for assigned duty, being disrespectful of a superior officer and disobeying a superior officer.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After six months as guardians of Haitian order, U.S. forces formally turned over peacekeeping duties to the United Nations on Friday, opening a new and risky chapter in the Caribbean nation's fitful experiment with democracy. President Clinton joined Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in hailing the U.S. military's success in displacing a dictatorship and setting a democratically elected government on its course. With the arrival of 20,000 U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will arrive today to mark the end of the major U.S. military presence here and will be greeted by a still-thankful nation, but one increasingly convinced that U.S. policy is to blame for Haiti's growing lawlessness and a brutal economic crisis. Clinton will officially turn over to the United Nations responsibility for following through on policies that began Sept. 19, when 20,000 U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. George A. Fisher, the U.S. military commander here, knew at least 10 days before Mireille Durocher was murdered that the outspoken anti-government figure was the target of a serious assassination plot allegedly involving Haitian Interior Minister Mondesir Beaubrun, American and Haitian sources said Wednesday. These officials said Fisher wrote to President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's government, outlining the plot.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | Reuters
U.S. military demolition experts Saturday blew up more than three tons of weapons and ammunition confiscated in Haiti in a disarmament effort, military officials said. Plastic explosives were used to destroy the munitions, including 1,300 mortar rounds, 800 rifle grenades and 1,100 hand grenades, at a remote military target range. Most of the weapons and ammunition were seized at Haitian military weapons depots or during street sweeps and raids, officials said. Some were bought by the U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conditions in Haiti will be stable and secure enough by the end of March to allow the Pentagon to hand over peacekeeping responsibilities there to the United Nations, Secretary of State Warren Christopher predicted Sunday. Although the U.N. forces will be commanded by a U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite a steady drumbeat of threats aimed at frightening Haitian military leaders out of power, the Clinton Administration has set aside any plan for armed intervention here until September at the earliest, U.S. and foreign officials said Tuesday. The main reason is practical, the officials said: The U.N. force that would be needed to provide order on the island after U.S. troops came ashore will not be ready before the fall.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a major disarmament search, the U.S. military found 180 weapons in Haiti, but almost half were inoperative, an Army official said. The haul at the Haitian military's Admiral Killick Naval Base was the biggest this year by U.S. soldiers looking for illegal arms.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conditions in Haiti will be stable and secure enough by the end of March to allow the Pentagon to hand over peacekeeping responsibilities there to the United Nations, Secretary of State Warren Christopher predicted Sunday. Although the U.N. forces will be commanded by a U.S.
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