Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Armed Forces Health
IN THE NEWS

United States Armed Forces Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Don Beaulieu's homecoming fell a little short of a ticker-tape parade. He returned from the Persian Gulf War on a stretcher, his body in tatters. It took the U.S. military 12 days to get him to the right hospital. Then he learned that his left foot would have to be amputated. In late March, two days before the operation in an Augusta, Ga., medical center, the 26-year-old U.S. Army sergeant from rural Maine turned to his fiancee, Sandra Sapp. "Are you still going to marry me?" he asked her sadly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon on Wednesday submitted to Congress a detailed rebuttal of a House panel report that accused the Pentagon of basing its anthrax vaccination program on "a paucity of science" and urged that it be suspended. The 76-page document disputed the House panel's assertion that the inoculation program is an exaggerated response to the threat that American troops could face a biological warfare attack. "Anthrax kills and kills quickly," the Pentagon response said.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 2, 1991
The Red Cross is asking Americans to consider donating tissue after their death for use as SKIN GRAFTS on soldiers wounded in the gulf. After blood, skin is the medical supply in greatest demand to help care for soldiers needing reconstructive surgery for burns and other injuries, according to the Red Cross. During the Vietnam War, 10% of soldiers wounded in battle received burns and 10% of those needed skin grafts.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee Tuesday declared the Pentagon's anthrax vaccination program an "overwrought" and risky response that may not shield American troops from deadly airborne spores, as intended. The 80-page report by the national security subcommittee of the Government Reform Committee said that the 2-year-old program should be made voluntary for GIs until a newer and better vaccine can be designed to shield them from germ weapons of potential adversaries, such as Iraq and North Korea.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war didn't kill Sherri Moyer's husband--a Marine reserve captain--but she is afraid that smog in the Persian Gulf will. Moyer and an increasing number of other families worry about the health effects on 380,000 U.S. servicemen who are inhaling the billowing dense, black smoke spewing from 600 burning Kuwaiti oil wells, set afire by retreating Iraqi troops. "I'm afraid he's going to come home a hero and die five or 10 years from now of a lung disease," said Moyer, a Carlsbad resident.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee Tuesday declared the Pentagon's anthrax vaccination program an "overwrought" and risky response that may not shield American troops from deadly airborne spores, as intended. The 80-page report by the national security subcommittee of the Government Reform Committee said that the 2-year-old program should be made voluntary for GIs until a newer and better vaccine can be designed to shield them from germ weapons of potential adversaries, such as Iraq and North Korea.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The Senate on Friday approved a $265-billion defense bill that includes a controversial requirement for service personnel carrying the AIDS virus to be discharged. The vote was 56 to 34 with Democrats casting most of the votes against it. Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, the top Democrat on the Armed Services Committee, said discharging people with HIV would create a human tragedy for no justifiable cause. Nunn told the Senate there were 1,150 service members with the human immunodeficiency virus among 1.
NEWS
July 27, 1988
Drug and alcohol abuse in the armed forces is steadily declining from the alarming levels of 1980, Pentagon officials said. The percentage of military personnel acknowledging use of illicit drugs in the 30 days before being surveyed dropped from 27% in 1980, to 19% in 1982, 9% in 1985 and 5.5% in 1988. In the latest survey, the 17,213 men and women taking part did not put their names on the forms, and the exercise was not intended to root out abusers.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon on Wednesday submitted to Congress a detailed rebuttal of a House panel report that accused the Pentagon of basing its anthrax vaccination program on "a paucity of science" and urged that it be suspended. The 76-page document disputed the House panel's assertion that the inoculation program is an exaggerated response to the threat that American troops could face a biological warfare attack. "Anthrax kills and kills quickly," the Pentagon response said.
NEWS
May 28, 1998 | Associated Press
A study shows for the first time how prolonged stress and a drug given to protect Persian Gulf War soldiers against chemical warfare each may cause long-term disruptions of memory and learning. Each creates a long-lasting decrease in mice of acetylcholine, a chemical messenger between brain cells that is important to thinking, the study said. The discovery could provide two ways to explain the thinking problems reported by some veterans who complain of Gulf War Syndrome.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pentagon-sponsored study has found grounds to suspect that an experimental nerve gas antidote given to as many as 300,000 U.S. troops during the Persian Gulf War may be a cause of the mysterious "Gulf War syndrome." Contradicting earlier official studies, the two-year analysis by the Rand Corp.--which will be released today--has concluded that the drug pyridostigmine bromide "cannot be excluded as a contributor" to a malady blamed for symptoms afflicting tens of thousands of veterans.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-nine sailors aboard the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt have been punished for refusing to accept anthrax vaccine shots, the Navy announced Thursday, in the latest sign of resistance in the ranks to what Pentagon officials believe is a low-risk preventive measure.
NEWS
May 28, 1998 | Associated Press
A study shows for the first time how prolonged stress and a drug given to protect Persian Gulf War soldiers against chemical warfare each may cause long-term disruptions of memory and learning. Each creates a long-lasting decrease in mice of acetylcholine, a chemical messenger between brain cells that is important to thinking, the study said. The discovery could provide two ways to explain the thinking problems reported by some veterans who complain of Gulf War Syndrome.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | TOM BOWMAN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
A growing number of U.S. sailors in the Persian Gulf are refusing to be vaccinated against the deadly biological agent anthrax out of concern about possible side effects and long-term health risks, according to family members and their advocates. The Pentagon last year announced that it would require, over a six-year period, that every member of the armed forces--1.4 million active-duty personnel and 1 million reservists--be vaccinated against anthrax.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The Senate on Friday approved a $265-billion defense bill that includes a controversial requirement for service personnel carrying the AIDS virus to be discharged. The vote was 56 to 34 with Democrats casting most of the votes against it. Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, the top Democrat on the Armed Services Committee, said discharging people with HIV would create a human tragedy for no justifiable cause. Nunn told the Senate there were 1,150 service members with the human immunodeficiency virus among 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tough lesson learned in the early days of the Persian Gulf War--not about tactics or weapons but about lettuce and other vegetables--may save the troops in Somalia considerable misery. The lesson occurred when some field commanders, taking pity on troops eating bland, prepackaged rations, accepted fresh vegetables bought in Egypt and other nearby countries. The result: Each week thousands of troops reported to sick call with diarrhea. This time, Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tough lesson learned in the early days of the Persian Gulf War--not about tactics or weapons but about lettuce and other vegetables--may save the troops in Somalia considerable misery. The lesson occurred when some field commanders, taking pity on troops eating bland, prepackaged rations, accepted fresh vegetables bought in Egypt and other nearby countries. The result: Each week thousands of troops reported to sick call with diarrhea. This time, Lt.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | TOM BOWMAN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
A growing number of U.S. sailors in the Persian Gulf are refusing to be vaccinated against the deadly biological agent anthrax out of concern about possible side effects and long-term health risks, according to family members and their advocates. The Pentagon last year announced that it would require, over a six-year period, that every member of the armed forces--1.4 million active-duty personnel and 1 million reservists--be vaccinated against anthrax.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Veterans Affairs Department is launching a program to look for unusual patterns of illness among veterans of the Gulf War amid mounting indications of a new affliction related to exposure to Kuwait's oil fires. A spokesman for the Veterans Administration, Terry Jemison, on Friday acknowledged that doctors are seeing "more and more anecdotal reports" that may point to the health effects of exposure to petroleum fires.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Don Beaulieu's homecoming fell a little short of a ticker-tape parade. He returned from the Persian Gulf War on a stretcher, his body in tatters. It took the U.S. military 12 days to get him to the right hospital. Then he learned that his left foot would have to be amputated. In late March, two days before the operation in an Augusta, Ga., medical center, the 26-year-old U.S. Army sergeant from rural Maine turned to his fiancee, Sandra Sapp. "Are you still going to marry me?" he asked her sadly.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|