Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Armed Forces Iraq
IN THE NEWS

United States Armed Forces Iraq

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | MARY JORDAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Minutes after an Iraqi missile hit his F-16 jet over Baghdad, Air Force Maj. Jeffrey S. Tice was out of his plane, alone in the vast sky, hurling toward Earth at 125 miles per hour, face first. "The clouds were coming up fast; I was dropping real fast," Tice said Friday, recounting the 15 long seconds when he dropped 10,000 feet before his parachute opened. "Over and over, I kept saying, 'The parachute has got to work.' " It did, and his 46 days of captivity in Iraq began.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past 10 weeks, U.S. fighter pilots have been taking off from this floating air base into a zone of heightened danger in the skies over Iraq. Ever since Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's military directive in December calling on his troops to resist allied aircraft at all costs, the rules of the game have changed. Almost daily now, U.S. and British pilots find themselves being targeted by radar, missiles or conventional antiaircraft artillery.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By throwing the heaviest concentration of armor since World War II against Saddam Hussein's vaunted Republican Guard, trapping it between a lethal "hammer and anvil," allied forces have launched the climactic battle of the Persian Gulf War. The engagement is the centerpiece of Operation Desert Storm, the objective of a seven-month political and military campaign that began Aug. 6 when the United States dispatched the first squadron of fighter planes to Saudi Arabia, U.S. officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A squadron of El Toro Marines could be sent to the Persian Gulf as early as next week, a base spokeswoman said Thursday. About 292 members of Marine Refueler Transport Squadron 352, based at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station in Orange County, were put on standby and told they could be flown to the gulf in five to 10 days, spokeswoman Shannon Olsen said. "That means that they are getting ready and probably will go," she said. "But until we get the execute order, we won't know for sure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995 | KEVIN UHRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Air Force Capt. James Wang isn't comfortable with his newly acquired celebrity status. Dressed in blue jeans and a blue-striped shirt, Wang stood before a crowd of reporters Wednesday at Los Angeles International Airport and fielded questions about his role in one of the most tragic "friendly fire" incidents in U.S. history. Wang, 29, faces court-martial proceedings over the April 14, 1994, downing of two American helicopters over a no-fly zone in northern Iraq.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Saddam Hussein's chalets command breathtaking views of this turquoise-green valley. Now, thanks to an allied agreement, the Iraqi leader can get bird's-eye reports on allied maneuvers from Republican Guards inside the resort hideaways. On Thursday, 2,500 American, British, French and Dutch marines and soldiers rolled into Hussein's chalet country, taking up positions near four of his summer palaces.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | PATRICK J. SLOYAN, NEWSDAY
Using plows mounted on tanks and combat earthmovers, the U.S. Army division that broke through Saddam Hussein's defensive front line buried thousands of Iraqi soldiers--some still alive and firing their weapons--in more than 70 miles of trenches, according to U.S. Army officials.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are, in a world where misery keeps banging on the front gate with clenched brown fists, two U.S. Army medics armed with stethoscopes, antibiotics and the will to comfort a nation past solace. The clinic in Safwan consists of a few examining tables, tall stacks of medication boxes, buckets of water mixed with antiseptic--and, everywhere, the hot, dry wind of an uneasy early summer, pushing through shattered windowpanes and rustling the robes of the waiting patients.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | WILLIAM BRANIGIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Kurdish elders Sunday rejected an Iraqi proposal for the return of as many as 200,000 Kurds to their homes in the northern Iraqi city of Dahuk, dealing a setback to U.S. efforts to broker a solution to a massive refugee problem. For an unusual meeting in the refugee "way station" of Kani Masi, Kurdish guerrilla representatives, Iraqi generals and U.S. Army officers were flown in by U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mud-brick ruins of this 6,000-year-old city, cited in the Old Testament and known as one of the oldest settlements in history, are surrounded by the misery and death of modern war. Beside the road that leads to the ancient home of Abraham, father of the Hebrew nation, are the blasted carcasses of at least 28 top-of-the-line, Soviet-built Iraqi jet fighters. Black smoke pours from the embattled city of Nasiriyah nearby.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration vowed Tuesday to continue enforcing its ban on flights by Iraqi military aircraft, although it acknowledged that Saddam Hussein's government got away with a "high wire act of political provocation" by sending helicopters to transport Muslim pilgrims across the southern "no-fly" zone.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Saddam Hussein ordered his helicopters into the U.S.-patrolled "no-fly" zone in southern Iraq, saying he intended to fly home Iraqi pilgrims returning from Saudi Arabia. Any U.S. action threatening the aircraft or pilgrims "will be met with the suitable response to deter aggression," the state-run Iraqi News Agency warned. The White House urged Iraq to not use aircraft in the zone without first applying for permission.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
U.S. warplanes arrived in Jordan on Friday and prepared to patrol Iraq's southern skies to enforce a "no fly" zone. They are the first U.S. combat jets to be based in the Hashemite kingdom for missions over Iraq. Their deployment underlined Jordan's increasing military links with the Clinton administration and its new role in the international campaign against Baghdad, its onetime ally.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after he beat court-martial charges this summer in the worst friendly-fire accident in recent history, Air Force Capt. Jim Wang was called into his general's office on the sprawling air base here. The general shook his hand, congratulated him on his acquittal and told him that the Air Force would now do everything it could to help him put his career back together. This week he was summoned back to the general's office. He was told his career is over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995 | KEVIN UHRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Air Force Capt. James Wang isn't comfortable with his newly acquired celebrity status. Dressed in blue jeans and a blue-striped shirt, Wang stood before a crowd of reporters Wednesday at Los Angeles International Airport and fielded questions about his role in one of the most tragic "friendly fire" incidents in U.S. history. Wang, 29, faces court-martial proceedings over the April 14, 1994, downing of two American helicopters over a no-fly zone in northern Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1995
An Army pilot from Culver City was among 14 U.S. servicemen awarded Purple Heart medals posthumously nearly a year after they were killed in a widely reported friendly-fire incident over northern Iraq. Erik Scott Mounsey, 28, was flying one of two U-60 Blackhawk helicopters shot down by U.S. Air Force jets in the April 14, 1994, incident that killed 26 people, 15 of them Americans. Mounsey, a native of Westchester, was married to his high school sweetheart, Kaye.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a drizzly mountain morning, Majid Suleyman's family climbed up from a sea of makeshift plastic tents and garbage and out of the smoky haze of breakfast campfires around their mile-high camp. They were anxious but excited, going home. After a month in refugee squalor on the Iraqi-Turkish border--tantalizingly close to the nine-room house they had left behind in the Iraqi town of Zakhu--the Suleymans joined the growing procession of Kurds returning to the allied haven in northern Iraq.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after he beat court-martial charges this summer in the worst friendly-fire accident in recent history, Air Force Capt. Jim Wang was called into his general's office on the sprawling air base here. The general shook his hand, congratulated him on his acquittal and told him that the Air Force would now do everything it could to help him put his career back together. This week he was summoned back to the general's office. He was told his career is over.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Reversing an earlier decision, the Pentagon will award Purple Hearts to 14 Americans killed when their helicopters were mistaken for hostile craft and shot down over Iraq. "The incident took place in a geographic area where the presence of hostile forces was anticipated," said a brief statement Tuesday from Air Force Secretary Sheila E. Widnall and Army Secretary Togo D. West Jr.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extremely rare reaction to a friendly fire accident, the Air Force announced Thursday that it has charged an F-15 fighter pilot with 26 separate counts of negligent homicide in the mistaken shooting earlier this year of two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters over Iraq. Five other Air Force crew members were charged with various counts of dereliction of duty in the April 14 catastrophe in the "no-fly" zone over northern Iraq.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|