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United States Armed Forces Iraq

NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Coalition forces in northern Iraq will not be drawn deeper into providing security in the region despite recurring attacks by Kurds on Iraqi police, a U.S. spokesman said Sunday. "We don't think the incidents have any dimensions that would necessitate any revision in our plans," said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Philip Crowley, a spokesman for the allied command at Incirlik, Turkey. "It is really something the Iraqis and Kurds themselves should work out."
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NEWS
May 26, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Ragtag refugees returned in the thousands to the northern Iraqi city of Dahuk on Saturday, after U.S.-led forces moved in to reassure the Kurds that it is safe to go back to the homes they fled in panic two months ago. Refugees rode in dozens of hired Iraqi trucks in a ragged procession along the main highway into Dahuk from the mountainous Turkish border 47 miles to the north. "This is a real breakthrough. It's a great day," said Staffan de Mistura, head of the U.N.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdel Wahed Atroushy, Baghdad's newly appointed governor for Dahuk province, arrived three days ago at the crumbling edge of Iraqi authority in the Kurdish north. His caravan of Mercedes-Benz sedans squealed to a stop in front of the bullet-pocked capitol building, disgorging the governor and his uniformed bodyguards, submachine guns at the ready. A squad of Iraqi soldiers armed with rifles and grenade launchers rimmed a raised garden overlooking the street below.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
A detachment of American soldiers will enter the strategic city of Dahuk in northern Iraq on Friday under an agreement between allied and Iraqi forces aimed at coaxing more Kurds home, the allied commander said. However, Kurdish guerrilla leaders rejected the plan and demanded a full-scale American occupation of the provincial capital, south of the allied security zone. "If we don't have the Americans, no one will go home," guerrilla leader Hussain Sinjari said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations Security Council tightened its punitive controls on Iraq Monday by setting up a reparations fund that will divert a percentage of Iraqi oil revenue to compensate Saddam Hussein's victims for damages suffered in the Persian Gulf crisis and war. But the council, while passing the reparations resolution by a vote of 14 to 0 with only Cuba abstaining, did not spell out just how much of a bite will be taken out of Iraq's oil revenues.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
The U.S. commander of the coalition forces repatriating Iraq's Kurdish refugees asked Baghdad on Wednesday to reduce its military presence in northern Iraq so that more Kurds will go home. Army Lt. Gen. John M. Shalikashvili also complained to the Iraqis about a shooting incident late Tuesday, in which Iraqi troops opened fire as a U.S. Army helicopter flew past them just outside the allied "security zone" in northern Iraq.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | WILLIAM BRANIGIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Kurdish elders Sunday rejected an Iraqi proposal for the return of as many as 200,000 Kurds to their homes in the northern Iraqi city of Dahuk, dealing a setback to U.S. efforts to broker a solution to a massive refugee problem. For an unusual meeting in the refugee "way station" of Kani Masi, Kurdish guerrilla representatives, Iraqi generals and U.S. Army officers were flown in by U.S.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Efforts to build a new postwar security alliance in the Persian Gulf have been dealt a series of setbacks in recent weeks, dividing the moderate Arab coalition forged during the Gulf crisis and threatening to drag the United States even deeper into volatile Middle East politics. The Bush Administration, already hip-deep in flagging efforts to broker a settlement to the long-running Arab-Israeli conflict, now finds itself with an indefinite commitment of U.S.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A freshly hung portrait of Saddam Hussein smiled down from a battle-scarred wall in this tense and desolate border town Friday as international observers pronounced the region free of military armed forces for the first time since the Persian Gulf War. Scarcely 48 hours after U.S. troops withdrew from southern Iraq, Safwan is being pulled back under the control of Iraqi authorities. The transition is not smooth.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the crushed Arab tribespeople of the villages near Sumail, the allied security zone in northern Iraq has already turned into what the Western coalition vowed it would never be: a Kurdish enclave that is a virtual mini-state in all but name. "The Kurds came here and told us, 'We'll massacre you if you don't get out,' " said Jamila Shaaba, an Arab mother loading a truck with bedsteads and hardware, adding her voice to the cries for justice that have become familiar in this troubled land.
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