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June 25, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bitter cold of December 1950, a convoy of 3,200 U.S. Army troops came under withering fire from tens of thousands of Chinese infantrymen massed in the hills east of Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. Twelve hours later, about 1,500 Americans from the 7th Infantry Division were dead, more than 1,000 were wounded and most of the convoy's 40 vehicles were charred hulks or in flames.
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NEWS
June 25, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bitter cold of December 1950, a convoy of 3,200 U.S. Army troops came under withering fire from tens of thousands of Chinese infantrymen massed in the hills east of Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. Twelve hours later, about 1,500 Americans from the 7th Infantry Division were dead, more than 1,000 were wounded and most of the convoy's 40 vehicles were charred hulks or in flames.
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NEWS
October 3, 1999 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In late July 1950, during the disastrous early weeks of the Korean War, the runner for H Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, was a little fellow with blond hair named Skaggs. When radio contact broke down, he was the one who delivered the orders. Artillery and mortar fire were dropping so close that Cpl. Edward Daily thought the North Koreans had to have a spotter nearby. Even so, when Skaggs skittered in beside him, Daily questioned the orders. "Skaggs told me to shoot," Daily remembered.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I remember you. You were the big guy with "Cornhusker" scrawled on the back of your dungaree jacket, ahead of me in the long, thin line of Marines that trudged up the mountainside. You grumbled as we bent into the effort, 40 pounds of gear on our backs, as darkness deepened and our anxiety grew. We could hear the unfamiliar boom of artillery from far off and the odd, muted drift of voices from the high ground. It was a strange and scary time.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The U.S. is sending naval ships and planes to the waters off Korea to monitor events following a deadly exchange between the North and South, the Pentagon said Wednesday. Pentagon spokesman Capt. Mike Doubleday said that the cruiser Vincennes, now in waters off Japan, will be deployed with another ship, which he did not name.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Army is extending its sensitive investigation into the alleged massacre of civilians by American soldiers during the Korean War amid indications that some of the most visible witnesses to the atrocity may be unreliable, U.S. officials say. After interviews with dozens of witnesses, Army investigators have turned up contradictory accounts of what happened in the hamlet of No Gun Ri in July 1950 during the panicked opening weeks of the war.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I remember you. You were the big guy with "Cornhusker" scrawled on the back of your dungaree jacket, ahead of me in the long, thin line of Marines that trudged up the mountainside. You grumbled as we bent into the effort, 40 pounds of gear on our backs, as darkness deepened and our anxiety grew. We could hear the unfamiliar boom of artillery from far off and the odd, muted drift of voices from the high ground. It was a strange and scary time.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Army is extending its sensitive investigation into the alleged massacre of civilians by American soldiers during the Korean War amid indications that some of the most visible witnesses to the atrocity may be unreliable, U.S. officials say. After interviews with dozens of witnesses, Army investigators have turned up contradictory accounts of what happened in the hamlet of No Gun Ri in July 1950 during the panicked opening weeks of the war.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In late July 1950, during the disastrous early weeks of the Korean War, the runner for H Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, was a little fellow with blond hair named Skaggs. When radio contact broke down, he was the one who delivered the orders. Artillery and mortar fire were dropping so close that Cpl. Edward Daily thought the North Koreans had to have a spotter nearby. Even so, when Skaggs skittered in beside him, Daily questioned the orders. "Skaggs told me to shoot," Daily remembered.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The U.S. is sending naval ships and planes to the waters off Korea to monitor events following a deadly exchange between the North and South, the Pentagon said Wednesday. Pentagon spokesman Capt. Mike Doubleday said that the cruiser Vincennes, now in waters off Japan, will be deployed with another ship, which he did not name.
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