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United States Armed Forces Kosovo Yugoslavia

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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Reuters
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld praised U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo on Tuesday for helping secure peace there and made no mention of sentiment in Washington for reducing overseas troop deployments. On the first visit to Kosovo by a senior figure in the Bush administration, he spoke to a gathering of several hundred cheering army soldiers in a tent at the main U.S. base in the Yugoslav province, saying their job was "truly a noble calling."
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Reuters
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld praised U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo on Tuesday for helping secure peace there and made no mention of sentiment in Washington for reducing overseas troop deployments. On the first visit to Kosovo by a senior figure in the Bush administration, he spoke to a gathering of several hundred cheering army soldiers in a tent at the main U.S. base in the Yugoslav province, saying their job was "truly a noble calling."
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NEWS
September 19, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were sent to Kosovo to keep the peace. But sometimes, these U.S. soldiers also kidnapped people, threatened them with knives and guns, beat them and spat on them. Sometimes, they made them lie on the icy ground and stepped on them if they complained. And once, they dug a hole in front of a man and told him it would be his grave--unless he did as they said.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were sent to Kosovo to keep the peace. But sometimes, these U.S. soldiers also kidnapped people, threatened them with knives and guns, beat them and spat on them. Sometimes, they made them lie on the icy ground and stepped on them if they complained. And once, they dug a hole in front of a man and told him it would be his grave--unless he did as they said.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taking less than an hour to deliberate, a military court here sentenced a U.S. soldier Tuesday to life in prison without parole for killing an 11-year-old ethnic Albanian girl while on peacekeeping duty in Kosovo. "I don't know what went wrong that day," Army Staff Sgt. Frank J. Ronghi, 36, of Niles, Ohio, said in an apology to the family of Merita Shabiu.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taking less than an hour to deliberate, a military court here sentenced a U.S. soldier Tuesday to life in prison without parole for killing an 11-year-old ethnic Albanian girl while on peacekeeping duty in Kosovo. "I don't know what went wrong that day," Army Staff Sgt. Frank J. Ronghi, 36, of Niles, Ohio, said in an apology to the family of Merita Shabiu.
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