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NEWS
August 11, 1990
1942-45--Persian Gulf Mission: In the largest Mideast mission until the current deployment to Saudi Arabia, the U.S. Persian Gulf Command during World War II facilitated transportation of munitions and supplies through Iran to the Soviet Union. It was dubbed "bridge to victory" by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. No fighting occurred. Force strength: 40,000. Fatalities: None from fighting.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
It was the deaths of 241 U.S. Marines in Lebanon that prompted two former soldiers to turn their shared home in Arleta into a veterans memorial in 1983. To mark the 11th anniversary of that tragic day, Joe Crowley and William Knuth will keep a 48-hour watch over the memorial this weekend. And they are inviting other patriots to join them. "This is especially for the 241 . . . who died in Beirut" said Joe Crowley.
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NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that it was being muzzled by a foreign government, St. Martin's Press on Thursday won an appeal overturning an injunction that had restrained the company from distributing a book purporting to expose the Mossad, Israel's super-secret intelligence agency. Issuing a brief ruling in the precedent-setting case, the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court dismissed a stay issued by a lower court judge Wednesday.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | from Associated Press
Ten years to the minute after a terrorist bomb killed 241 U.S. servicemen in Beirut, relatives commemorated the deaths by dousing symbolic candle flames. More than 1,500 people gathered Saturday at the Beirut Memorial in woods near Camp Lejeune. A gray marble wall bears the names of all who died in the 1983 blast. "The light of the soldiers who died is still bright and clear and strong," said Marine Commandant Gen. Carl E. Mundy Jr. "We all stand in it today. They gave peace to a tortured land .
NEWS
October 24, 1988
A wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery honored the 241 American servicemen and 56 French paratroopers killed in Beirut on Oct. 23, 1983. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Robert Winglass said the men will be remembered for having turned world opinion against terrorism. After the attack five years ago, in which a truckload of explosives was driven into a U.S. Marine Corps compound at the Beirut airport, 1,800 U.S. troops in Lebanon with an international peacekeeping force were withdrawn.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | from Associated Press
Ten years to the minute after a terrorist bomb killed 241 U.S. servicemen in Beirut, relatives commemorated the deaths by dousing symbolic candle flames. More than 1,500 people gathered Saturday at the Beirut Memorial in woods near Camp Lejeune. A gray marble wall bears the names of all who died in the 1983 blast. "The light of the soldiers who died is still bright and clear and strong," said Marine Commandant Gen. Carl E. Mundy Jr. "We all stand in it today. They gave peace to a tortured land .
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Israel could have prevented the bombing that killed 241 Marines in Lebanon in 1983 but it chose not to give the Americans details of the plot, according to a book about Israel's fabled Mossad intelligence agency. The book, "By Way of Deception: The Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer," was written by Victor Ostrovsky, a Canadian-born artist who grew up in Israel and said he served in the agency for four years starting in 1983.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Syria accused the United States on Wednesday of using the hostage crisis as a pretext for an attack on Lebanon, where a major U.S. naval force was being marshaled off the coast in the eastern Mediterranean. In Washington, the White House urged "a little downgrading of the speculation" concerning U.S. intentions in the area. Another source called the deployment "precautionary." Fears of a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
It was the deaths of 241 U.S. Marines in Lebanon that prompted two former soldiers to turn their shared home in Arleta into a veterans memorial in 1983. To mark the 11th anniversary of that tragic day, Joe Crowley and William Knuth will keep a 48-hour watch over the memorial this weekend. And they are inviting other patriots to join them. "This is especially for the 241 . . . who died in Beirut" said Joe Crowley.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, clarifying a statement by his secretary of defense, said Friday that Americans will continue serving with a U.N. force in Lebanon despite the kidnaping of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins. "We are going to meet our obligations to the United Nations," Reagan declared hours after Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci hedged about the possible withdrawal of U.S. personnel. "No decision has been made," Carlucci said on NBC-TV's "Today" show.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that it was being muzzled by a foreign government, St. Martin's Press on Thursday won an appeal overturning an injunction that had restrained the company from distributing a book purporting to expose the Mossad, Israel's super-secret intelligence agency. Issuing a brief ruling in the precedent-setting case, the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court dismissed a stay issued by a lower court judge Wednesday.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Israel could have prevented the bombing that killed 241 Marines in Lebanon in 1983 but it chose not to give the Americans details of the plot, according to a book about Israel's fabled Mossad intelligence agency. The book, "By Way of Deception: The Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer," was written by Victor Ostrovsky, a Canadian-born artist who grew up in Israel and said he served in the agency for four years starting in 1983.
NEWS
August 11, 1990
1942-45--Persian Gulf Mission: In the largest Mideast mission until the current deployment to Saudi Arabia, the U.S. Persian Gulf Command during World War II facilitated transportation of munitions and supplies through Iran to the Soviet Union. It was dubbed "bridge to victory" by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. No fighting occurred. Force strength: 40,000. Fatalities: None from fighting.
NEWS
December 2, 1988
The Reagan Administration has ordered American military officers assigned to U.N. peacekeeping duties in the Middle East out of the unit that patrols southern Lebanon, senior officials said. The decision comes 9 1/2 months after the abduction of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins, the senior U.S. military officer assigned to Observer Group Lebanon of the U.N. Truce Supervisory Organization. Higgins was kidnaped Feb.
NEWS
October 24, 1988
A wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery honored the 241 American servicemen and 56 French paratroopers killed in Beirut on Oct. 23, 1983. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Robert Winglass said the men will be remembered for having turned world opinion against terrorism. After the attack five years ago, in which a truckload of explosives was driven into a U.S. Marine Corps compound at the Beirut airport, 1,800 U.S. troops in Lebanon with an international peacekeeping force were withdrawn.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Five years ago today, at 6:22 on a balmy Sunday morning, Lt. Joe Golebiowski was making breakfast tea on the perimeter of the Marine position at Beirut's International Airport when a deafening explosion nearly blew him off his feet. Grabbing his binoculars, the young platoon commander searched for the target. Then he realized he was looking at a building he had been unable to see before. The Marine battalion headquarters had always stood in the way.
NEWS
December 2, 1988
The Reagan Administration has ordered American military officers assigned to U.N. peacekeeping duties in the Middle East out of the unit that patrols southern Lebanon, senior officials said. The decision comes 9 1/2 months after the abduction of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins, the senior U.S. military officer assigned to Observer Group Lebanon of the U.N. Truce Supervisory Organization. Higgins was kidnaped Feb.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Five years ago today, at 6:22 on a balmy Sunday morning, Lt. Joe Golebiowski was making breakfast tea on the perimeter of the Marine position at Beirut's International Airport when a deafening explosion nearly blew him off his feet. Grabbing his binoculars, the young platoon commander searched for the target. Then he realized he was looking at a building he had been unable to see before. The Marine battalion headquarters had always stood in the way.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
On the paneled wall of Larry Gerlach's study, a red-matted shadowbox displays the 20 medals, including two Purple Hearts, that he won during 21 years in the Marine Corps. On the floor below was a red wheelchair and crutches that are souvenirs of his last posting in Beirut. Gerlach, nicknamed "Papa Bear" by his troops and peers because of his hulking frame and gentle nature, was the battalion commander in Beirut on Oct. 23, 1983. Today he has only partial use of his arms and legs.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, clarifying a statement by his secretary of defense, said Friday that Americans will continue serving with a U.N. force in Lebanon despite the kidnaping of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins. "We are going to meet our obligations to the United Nations," Reagan declared hours after Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci hedged about the possible withdrawal of U.S. personnel. "No decision has been made," Carlucci said on NBC-TV's "Today" show.
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