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NEWS
May 3, 1992
In the past, federal troop deployments have included: * 1968: President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered 26,500 federal troops sent to Baltimore, Chicago and Washington when disorder erupted across the country after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. * 1967: President Johnson ordered federal troops sent to Detroit after two days of rioting in July. * 1960s: Federal troops were used during anti-war demonstrations in the 1960s and 1970s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
The bride wore white. The groom wore camouflage fatigues. Wedding guests carried M-16 rifles and arrived in armored Humvees. Such were Cupid's compromises when Spec. Matt Coy, 30, and Lisse Mallory, 28, both of Rancho Cucamonga, revived plans canceled by his call to riot duty and married Wednesday in the rose garden at Exposition Park. The preacher was a chaplain from the 18th Cavalry.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
The bride wore white. The groom wore camouflage fatigues. Wedding guests carried M-16 rifles and arrived in armored Humvees. Such were Cupid's compromises when Spec. Matt Coy, 30, and Lisse Mallory, 28, both of Rancho Cucamonga, revived plans canceled by his call to riot duty and married Wednesday in the rose garden at Exposition Park. The preacher was a chaplain from the 18th Cavalry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 10,000 U.S. troops being withdrawn from the streets of Los Angeles, the Marine Corps is forming a "rapid-reaction" force that could be redeployed in three hours if violence reignites, Pentagon officials said Tuesday. Active-duty Army troops have returned to Ft. Ord, but 1,500 Marines will remain on alert at their base at Camp Pendleton near Oceanside, with orders to be ready to move into Los Angeles, said Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | From The Times's Washington staff
MISSION L.A.: Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other Pentagon brass had mixed feelings about sending troops to help keep a lid on L.A. after the riots. "Nobody likes the idea of using U.S. troops for this purpose," one official said. It's like involving troops in the drug war: The operations are expensive, are aimed at symptoms instead of causes and distract soldiers from training to fight real wars. . . .
NEWS
May 19, 1991
The Orange County Victory Parade may have been just a warm-up for Southern California's main military event. This afternoon, a parade to honor the returning troops of the Gulf War will wind down the streets of Hollywood, featuring such big-name stars as Bob Hope and Roseanne Barr. Army Lt. Gen. Calvin A. H. Waller, deputy commander of Operation Desert Storm, is the parade grand marshal. Retired Gen. William C. Westmoreland, commander of U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1992
Maj. Gen. Marvin L. Covault, 51, took command of all the military forces in Los Angeles Friday night on orders from President Bush. Covault's assignment as chief of the Joint Task Force Los Angeles puts 4,500 active duty Marines and Army soldiers at his command. He also has assumed authority over more than 6,000 National Guard troops called to Southern California to help quell the rioting. "The biggest concern we all have is loss of life," Covault said in an interview Saturday.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Here is a look at some of the law enforcement personnel and troops who have been deployed or await deployment as of 5 p.m. Sunday: * LAPD (about 2,500 each shift, 1,800 deployed at any one time): 5,000 * California Highway Patrol (700 deployed at any one time. Officers are from all over the state.): 2,370 * Outside agencies (Includes L.A. County sheriff's deputies): 1,277 * California National Guard: 7,000 5,000 deployed on the street. 2,000 waiting for missions to be assigned.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 1,300 Marines arrived at the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station on Friday with decidedly mixed feelings about the prospect of fighting fellow Americans in the streets of Los Angeles. "It's not really appetizing," said Lance Cpl. James Dodd, 20, from Alabama. "This is in our own country, fighting our own people. We all feel some natural apprehension."
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After spending two days in Los Angeles surveying the fire-gutted buildings and looted stores that are the legacy of the nation's worst riots this century, President Bush flew back to Washington on Friday as the military scaled back its presence to just 176 troops patrolling city streets.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | From The Times's Washington staff
MISSION L.A.: Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other Pentagon brass had mixed feelings about sending troops to help keep a lid on L.A. after the riots. "Nobody likes the idea of using U.S. troops for this purpose," one official said. It's like involving troops in the drug war: The operations are expensive, are aimed at symptoms instead of causes and distract soldiers from training to fight real wars. . . .
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After spending two days in Los Angeles surveying the fire-gutted buildings and looted stores that are the legacy of the nation's worst riots this century, President Bush flew back to Washington on Friday as the military scaled back its presence to just 176 troops patrolling city streets.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush arrived in riot-scarred Los Angeles late Wednesday, carrying words of reconciliation but little in the way of additional dollars from Washington. Calling repeatedly for a period of healing, Bush retreated from his Administration's efforts to blame last week's riots on what presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater termed the "liberal programs of the '60s and '70s."
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | JIM NEWTON and BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of National Guard and U.S. military troops now stationed in Los Angeles arrived as strangers charged with quelling the worst rioting in the city's history. But after a string of long days and nights on the job, the troops find themselves swept up in the everyday life and violence of the communities they guard. They've been fed food and candy, and even had hymns sung to them.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Here is a look at some of the law enforcement personnel and troops who have been deployed or await deployment as of 5 p.m. Sunday: * LAPD (about 2,500 each shift, 1,800 deployed at any one time): 5,000 * California Highway Patrol (700 deployed at any one time. Officers are from all over the state.): 2,370 * Outside agencies (Includes L.A. County sheriff's deputies): 1,277 * California National Guard: 7,000 5,000 deployed on the street. 2,000 waiting for missions to be assigned.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Raising the curtain on post-riot Los Angeles, Mayor Tom Bradley on Sunday announced that he is lifting the dusk-to-dawn curfew as of tonight and declared optimistically that the looting, arson and violence of last week now "appears to be under control." Under control, perhaps, but life was far from normal: National Guard members Sunday night shot and killed a motorist they said drove toward them after running a barricade at the corner of Pico Boulevard and Vermont Avenue.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles awoke Saturday from a horrific three-day nightmare with sunny skies replacing plumes of smoke and expressions of hope--even optimism--finally surfacing in its riot-torn streets. Like a child interrupted in its sleep, the city stumbled gingerly into the daylight, uncertain whether to celebrate or distrust the jittery calm, confused about what had transpired over the previous 60 hours and searching anywhere for a comforting embrace.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the military's grease pencil diagrams they are part of the 3rd Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion of the 160th Infantry, California Army National Guard. Less formally, they are a squad of grunts from Visalia who are as much family as combat team. Staff Sgt. Jim Lysiak, 34, is the boss. He's an engineering technician who joined the weekend military to extend 11 years spent in Germany and Korea with the active Army.
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