Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Armed Forces Macedonia
IN THE NEWS

United States Armed Forces Macedonia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step he called "both symbolic and tangible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced Thursday that the United States will send a reinforced infantry company of 300 troops to Macedonia to join a U.N. observer force intended to prevent the Balkan war from spilling over into another former Yugoslav republic. Although Macedonia is relatively peaceful and is well away from the Bosnia-Herzegovina war zone, the infantrymen will be the first U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid continuing skirmishes in northern Macedonia, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on Wednesday said the United States has "no plans" to send ground troops to the Balkan nation or increase the number of American peacekeepers in neighboring Kosovo. But Rumsfeld, appearing at the Pentagon with British Defense Secretary Geoff Hoon, said the U.S. has been shifting troops in Kosovo to the border, which ethnic Albanian fighters have been crossing en route to Macedonia. Other U.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh from their victory in the 40-year-old standoff between East and West, 300 soldiers from the U.S. Army's Berlin Brigade are coming here on a mission to stare down one of the greatest threats of the post-Cold War era. While the watchful presence of U.S. troops and their impressive array of military hardware caused communism to blink first in the protracted face-off with Western democracy, it is an open question whether the mere reputation of the U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Macedonia wants criminal charges pressed against U.S. soldiers detained after a clash with residents that left a policeman seriously injured, a police spokesman said Thursday. Stevo Pendarovski said Macedonian authorities will seek assault charges against American soldiers allegedly responsible for injuring a Macedonian policeman and brawling with residents Wednesday. The policeman was injured when he tried to intervene in a clash between the soldiers and civilians in Skopje, the capital.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid continuing skirmishes in northern Macedonia, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on Wednesday said the United States has "no plans" to send ground troops to the Balkan nation or increase the number of American peacekeepers in neighboring Kosovo. But Rumsfeld, appearing at the Pentagon with British Defense Secretary Geoff Hoon, said the U.S. has been shifting troops in Kosovo to the border, which ethnic Albanian fighters have been crossing en route to Macedonia. Other U.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
The first American GIs sent to keep peace in the former Yugoslav federation arrived Monday with orders to keep Bosnia's war from spreading into a land that has often been a flash point for Balkan bloodletting. Two C-141s landed in Macedonia's capital with 20 soldiers from the U.S. Army's Berlin Brigade, wearing the powder-blue berets of the United Nations. The planes also carried vehicles and supplies.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Macedonia wants criminal charges pressed against U.S. soldiers detained after a clash with residents that left a policeman seriously injured, a police spokesman said Thursday. Stevo Pendarovski said Macedonian authorities will seek assault charges against American soldiers allegedly responsible for injuring a Macedonian policeman and brawling with residents Wednesday. The policeman was injured when he tried to intervene in a clash between the soldiers and civilians in Skopje, the capital.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Tuesday he is considering sending U.S. ground troops to join U.N. peacekeeping forces in Macedonia in hopes of stopping the Bosnian conflict from spreading to other parts of the Balkans. In an exchange with reporters, Clinton said the possibility of an American presence in the former Yugoslav republic was "one of the many things being discussed," and he cautioned that "no final decisions have been made." He gave no indication when, if at all, he might announce such a move.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by his allies' objections to military action in Bosnia-Herzegovina, President Clinton is wrestling again with the issue of how to stop the war in Bosnia. But this time, in an unusual move for a chief executive, he is doing much of his deliberating in public. Clinton still hopes to persuade Britain, France and other nations to support his proposal to lift the international arms embargo on Bosnia and launch air strikes against Serbian military positions there, aides said.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
The first American GIs sent to keep peace in the former Yugoslav federation arrived Monday with orders to keep Bosnia's war from spreading into a land that has often been a flash point for Balkan bloodletting. Two C-141s landed in Macedonia's capital with 20 soldiers from the U.S. Army's Berlin Brigade, wearing the powder-blue berets of the United Nations. The planes also carried vehicles and supplies.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh from their victory in the 40-year-old standoff between East and West, 300 soldiers from the U.S. Army's Berlin Brigade are coming here on a mission to stare down one of the greatest threats of the post-Cold War era. While the watchful presence of U.S. troops and their impressive array of military hardware caused communism to blink first in the protracted face-off with Western democracy, it is an open question whether the mere reputation of the U.S.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step he called "both symbolic and tangible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced Thursday that the United States will send a reinforced infantry company of 300 troops to Macedonia to join a U.N. observer force intended to prevent the Balkan war from spilling over into another former Yugoslav republic. Although Macedonia is relatively peaceful and is well away from the Bosnia-Herzegovina war zone, the infantrymen will be the first U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by his allies' objections to military action in Bosnia-Herzegovina, President Clinton is wrestling again with the issue of how to stop the war in Bosnia. But this time, in an unusual move for a chief executive, he is doing much of his deliberating in public. Clinton still hopes to persuade Britain, France and other nations to support his proposal to lift the international arms embargo on Bosnia and launch air strikes against Serbian military positions there, aides said.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Tuesday he is considering sending U.S. ground troops to join U.N. peacekeeping forces in Macedonia in hopes of stopping the Bosnian conflict from spreading to other parts of the Balkans. In an exchange with reporters, Clinton said the possibility of an American presence in the former Yugoslav republic was "one of the many things being discussed," and he cautioned that "no final decisions have been made." He gave no indication when, if at all, he might announce such a move.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|