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January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
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NEWS
January 12, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The United States, joined in a rare triple veto by Britain and France, on Wednesday blocked a Security Council resolution deploring the U.S. downing on Jan. 4 of two Libyan warplanes and calling on the United States to suspend its maneuvers off the coast of Libya.
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NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
"Good kill. Good kill. Good kill. Pilot ejected." With those words, two Navy F-14 pilots ended a tense, eight-minute encounter that sent two Libyan MIG-23 fighters into the Mediterranean. The Pentagon on Thursday released cockpit tapes of the downing of the Libyan jets that reveal in gripping detail the two American pilots' efforts to evade the MIGs and their frustration at balky gear and missiles that went astray.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci denied Friday that the American pilots who downed two Libyan fighters last week acted without proper authority. "In my opinion, those pilots . . . acted prudently," Carlucci said. "There's no question that they were in jeopardy." The defense secretary was responding to an article in Tuesday's Washington Post that questioned whether the U.S. F-14 pilots had clearance from their superiors to fire the missiles that knocked down the two Libyan MIG-23s.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci denied Friday that the American pilots who downed two Libyan fighters last week acted without proper authority. "In my opinion, those pilots . . . acted prudently," Carlucci said. "There's no question that they were in jeopardy." The defense secretary was responding to an article in Tuesday's Washington Post that questioned whether the U.S. F-14 pilots had clearance from their superiors to fire the missiles that knocked down the two Libyan MIG-23s.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Libyan jet fighters, in the first such overt military move since the U.S. bombing raids last year, twice last week flew so near a Navy cruiser in the Mediterranean Sea that the ship's crew was forced to man battle stations, Pentagon sources said Thursday. The Pentagon, in a statement in response to a reporter's query, confirmed that the Soviet-built MIG-23 "Flogger" fighter jets approached the nuclear-powered South Carolina twice on June 17.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Libya, in the days before Wednesday's fatal clash with U.S. Navy jets, had taken a series of military steps that suggest it was expecting an American military strike, Administration sources said Thursday. The Libyan air force had stepped up flights by its fighter planes, the sources said, and Libyan jets made several close passes at U.S. reconnaissance aircraft patrolling with the Mediterranean 6th Fleet.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Navy's 6th Fleet will conduct maneuvers off the Libyan coast next week, less than two weeks after two U.S. fighter jets downed a pair of Libyan warplanes over the Mediterranean, the Libyan ambassador to the United Nations said Tuesday. The Navy notified civilian aviation authorities in Libya that the naval exercises will take place Jan. 16 and 17 and warned civilian air traffic to steer clear of the area, Libyan Ambassador Ali Treiki told U.N. Security Council members.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Libya charged Friday that the United States fabricated videotaped evidence of the final moments of an aerial encounter over the Mediterranean to falsely indicate that two Libyan jets shot down by Navy warplanes were heavily armed and had hostile intent. "These pictures, these tapes, they are fake, fake, fake!" declared Ali Muntasser, Libya's deputy representative to the United Nations. The videotapes, taken by a camera in one of the U.S. aircraft, were products of "the world of Hollywood.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
Here is a partial transcript of the Pentagon briefing Wednesday by Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci and Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on the incident in which two U.S. Navy planes shot down two Libyan jet fighters over the Mediterranean Sea. Carlucci: Good morning. The chairman and I are here to present the facts of the Libyan incident, as we understand them at this point. And let me emphasize that.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Navy's 6th Fleet will conduct maneuvers off the Libyan coast next week, less than two weeks after two U.S. fighter jets downed a pair of Libyan warplanes over the Mediterranean, the Libyan ambassador to the United Nations said Tuesday. The Navy notified civilian aviation authorities in Libya that the naval exercises will take place Jan. 16 and 17 and warned civilian air traffic to steer clear of the area, Libyan Ambassador Ali Treiki told U.N. Security Council members.
NEWS
January 10, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
Several members of the U.N. Security Council, hoping to isolate the United States in the international forum, on Monday delayed a vote condemning the American downing of two Libyan warplanes and worked to soften the rebuke in an effort to win broader support.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Libya charged Friday that the United States fabricated videotaped evidence of the final moments of an aerial encounter over the Mediterranean to falsely indicate that two Libyan jets shot down by Navy warplanes were heavily armed and had hostile intent. "These pictures, these tapes, they are fake, fake, fake!" declared Ali Muntasser, Libya's deputy representative to the United Nations. The videotapes, taken by a camera in one of the U.S. aircraft, were products of "the world of Hollywood.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Libya, in the days before Wednesday's fatal clash with U.S. Navy jets, had taken a series of military steps that suggest it was expecting an American military strike, Administration sources said Thursday. The Libyan air force had stepped up flights by its fighter planes, the sources said, and Libyan jets made several close passes at U.S. reconnaissance aircraft patrolling with the Mediterranean 6th Fleet.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
In Wednesday's high-speed aerial combat, played out at 7,000 feet above the Mediterranean, American naval aviators used textbook fighter-jock maneuvers against less experienced Libyan fliers. And the outcome, destruction of the two Libyan jets without U.S. losses, points up the importance of intensive pilot training and the highly flexible tactics that American pilots are allowed to use, experts said Thursday.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
In one of the harshest criticisms of U.S. policy in recent months, the Soviet Union on Thursday accused the Reagan Administration of "political adventurism and state terrorism" for having shot down two Libyan warplanes. Official statements also warned the United States against escalating the conflict with Libya, especially by making any attack on a purported chemical weapons factory at Rabta, 40 miles southwest of the Libyan capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
In Wednesday's high-speed aerial combat, played out at 7,000 feet above the Mediterranean, American naval aviators used textbook fighter-jock maneuvers against less experienced Libyan fliers. And the outcome, destruction of the two Libyan jets without U.S. losses, points up the importance of intensive pilot training and the highly flexible tactics that American pilots are allowed to use, experts said Thursday.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
In one of the harshest criticisms of U.S. policy in recent months, the Soviet Union on Thursday accused the Reagan Administration of "political adventurism and state terrorism" for having shot down two Libyan warplanes. Official statements also warned the United States against escalating the conflict with Libya, especially by making any attack on a purported chemical weapons factory at Rabta, 40 miles southwest of the Libyan capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
"Good kill. Good kill. Good kill. Pilot ejected." With those words, two Navy F-14 pilots ended a tense, eight-minute encounter that sent two Libyan MIG-23 fighters into the Mediterranean. The Pentagon on Thursday released cockpit tapes of the downing of the Libyan jets that reveal in gripping detail the two American pilots' efforts to evade the MIGs and their frustration at balky gear and missiles that went astray.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
Here is a partial transcript of the Pentagon briefing Wednesday by Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci and Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on the incident in which two U.S. Navy planes shot down two Libyan jet fighters over the Mediterranean Sea. Carlucci: Good morning. The chairman and I are here to present the facts of the Libyan incident, as we understand them at this point. And let me emphasize that.
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