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NEWS
October 29, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Patrick Howard Roy and Lakeina Monique Francis, two of the 17 sailors killed in the Oct. 12 bomb attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole in Yemen, were buried Saturday. Roy's burial at Antietam National Cemetery in Sharpsburg, Md., was the first in 22 years at the cemetery, where most of the graves are those of Civil War soldiers.
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NEWS
January 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A top Navy officer has determined that the warship Cole's captain should not face disciplinary action, although the captain and crew were faulted by an investigating officer for not completely following security procedures before a terrorist attack in October, said sources close to the investigation. Adm. Robert J. Natter, commander of the Atlantic Fleet, reached the conclusion after reviewing the Navy's investigative report on how the Cole's skipper, Cmdr.
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NEWS
September 10, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intelligence community warned Thursday that proliferation of medium-range ballistic missiles, driven primarily by sales from North Korea, presents an "immediate, serious and growing threat" to U.S. forces and allies in the Middle East and Asia and has "significantly altered" the strategic balances there.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | Reuters
Officials have proof that six people in custody in Yemen were involved in the apparent suicide attack on the U.S. warship Cole in Aden in October and are questioning more suspects, the interior minister said in remarks published Thursday. Minister Hussein Mohammed Arab told a government newspaper that the investigation of the six suspects was complete and had proved their involvement in the Oct. 12 attack on the guided-missile destroyer.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | Reuters
Officials have proof that six people in custody in Yemen were involved in the apparent suicide attack on the U.S. warship Cole in Aden in October and are questioning more suspects, the interior minister said in remarks published Thursday. Minister Hussein Mohammed Arab told a government newspaper that the investigation of the six suspects was complete and had proved their involvement in the Oct. 12 attack on the guided-missile destroyer.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a bomb blasted a hole in the U.S. destroyer Cole last month, U.S. officials first portrayed the incident as a case of a well-guarded warship falling victim to the kind of calamities that are bound to occur when American forces patrol the dangerous Middle East. In the weeks since, however, additional information has come to light on how well-protected the warship really was.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was still early, but rumors were spreading quickly through the frantic khat market. A lean man with teeth stained brown from chewing the narcotic leaf said it was the Israelis who attacked the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole, which is still sitting in the deep green waters of the harbor just a few miles from the souk. Another Yemeni blamed Thursday's bombing on the Afghans, and yet another said that Americans themselves were to blame, for supporting Israel and keeping U.S.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Local investigators in Yemen have seized bomb-making equipment in an abandoned dwelling near the Port of Aden, and several men who stayed there may be linked to the suicide bombing of a U.S. warship here, an American official said Tuesday. The FBI official in Washington said the discovery appeared "significant" but warned that it was too early to know if the raid by Yemeni authorities would help identify the people behind Thursday's deadly attack on the guided missile destroyer Cole.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Security was beefed up around a hotel in Aden on Thursday after a bomb threat targeted Americans staying there who are investigating the attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole. Yemeni security officials said the bomb threat by an unknown caller came about midnight. Yemeni and U.S. security officials held an emergency meeting before dawn. They surrounded the hotel with military vehicles mounted with machine guns and prevented civilian traffic from getting within 500 yards of the site.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that President Bush may begin to call up the military reserves as a result of the Middle East crisis has caught most Southland companies flat-footed, without even a ballpark figure on how many of their employees serve in the reserves. Although many have personnel policies covering military leave, few firms have developed contingency plans to deal with prolonged employee absences that could result from a broad-based call-up of the reserves.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Navy investigation has found that the crew of the destroyer Cole failed to follow several security procedures on the day the warship was bombed by terrorists in Aden, Yemen, defense officials said Friday. Officials declined to provide details of the lapses. But the acknowledgment raises the possibility that the ship's skipper, Cmdr.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a bomb blasted a hole in the U.S. destroyer Cole last month, U.S. officials first portrayed the incident as a case of a well-guarded warship falling victim to the kind of calamities that are bound to occur when American forces patrol the dangerous Middle East. In the weeks since, however, additional information has come to light on how well-protected the warship really was.
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Patrick Howard Roy and Lakeina Monique Francis, two of the 17 sailors killed in the Oct. 12 bomb attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole in Yemen, were buried Saturday. Roy's burial at Antietam National Cemetery in Sharpsburg, Md., was the first in 22 years at the cemetery, where most of the graves are those of Civil War soldiers.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lunchtime scene here Friday at the Sailor's Club reflected the fear, hope and sorrow that the Cole will leave behind this weekend when a U.S. heavy tug is scheduled to maneuver the crippled U.S. warship to a Norwegian salvage vessel. Business has been brisk at the restaurant, a half-century-old British colonial relic whose view of the damaged Cole has drawn crowds.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Security was beefed up around a hotel in Aden on Thursday after a bomb threat targeted Americans staying there who are investigating the attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole. Yemeni security officials said the bomb threat by an unknown caller came about midnight. Yemeni and U.S. security officials held an emergency meeting before dawn. They surrounded the hotel with military vehicles mounted with machine guns and prevented civilian traffic from getting within 500 yards of the site.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. intelligence agencies have detected a specific threat that a suicide bomber might try to drive a vehicle loaded with explosives onto a runway under a U.S. aircraft in Bahrain, as well as terrorist threats to American embassies there and in nearby Qatar, a U.S. intelligence official said Wednesday. The threats were deemed credible enough that the Pentagon on Monday ordered U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Finding something positive in the Persian Gulf crisis is as easy as finding a needle in a sand dune. But try this. Education. There was a time when the only knowledge most of us had about the port of Aqaba was that Peter O'Toole led an Arab army that took it from the Turks in "Lawrence of Arabia." Big movie, bigger information gap.
NEWS
August 11, 1990
1942-45--Persian Gulf Mission: In the largest Mideast mission until the current deployment to Saudi Arabia, the U.S. Persian Gulf Command during World War II facilitated transportation of munitions and supplies through Iran to the Soviet Union. It was dubbed "bridge to victory" by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. No fighting occurred. Force strength: 40,000. Fatalities: None from fighting.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was still early, but rumors were spreading quickly through the frantic khat market. A lean man with teeth stained brown from chewing the narcotic leaf said it was the Israelis who attacked the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole, which is still sitting in the deep green waters of the harbor just a few miles from the souk. Another Yemeni blamed Thursday's bombing on the Afghans, and yet another said that Americans themselves were to blame, for supporting Israel and keeping U.S.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Local investigators in Yemen have seized bomb-making equipment in an abandoned dwelling near the Port of Aden, and several men who stayed there may be linked to the suicide bombing of a U.S. warship here, an American official said Tuesday. The FBI official in Washington said the discovery appeared "significant" but warned that it was too early to know if the raid by Yemeni authorities would help identify the people behind Thursday's deadly attack on the guided missile destroyer Cole.
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