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United States Armed Forces North Korea

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NEWS
June 20, 1994 | Associated Press
North Korean leader Kim Il Sung at first rejected former President Jimmy Carter's proposal to turn over remains of U.S. servicemen from the Korean War. Then came the nod from Kim's wife, Kim Jong Ae. "OK," the Great Leader told Carter. "It's done. It's done." Carter relayed the deal-making moment to reporters with a chuckle, part of a 90-minute interview full of wide-eyed optimism. "He said we can include that in future negotiations.
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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials probing the alleged massacre of civilians during the Korean War are considering granting an unprecedented blanket immunity for all Americans connected to an incident that witnesses say left hundreds of Koreans dead. By encouraging witness cooperation, an immunity grant would presumably help the government assemble the fullest record of what happened in the South Korean hamlet of No Gun Ri.
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NEWS
June 20, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wherever Marines gather, from the tattoo parlors and pool halls outside Camp Pendleton to the quietude of their homes near El Toro, the talk has been the same. And it points increasingly to one thing. "Korea, man. Korea . . . " Lance Cpl. Thomas Babbitt, 26, stationed at Camp Pendleton, said last week. "That's all anyone is talking about."
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | Associated Press
North Korean leader Kim Il Sung at first rejected former President Jimmy Carter's proposal to turn over remains of U.S. servicemen from the Korean War. Then came the nod from Kim's wife, Kim Jong Ae. "OK," the Great Leader told Carter. "It's done. It's done." Carter relayed the deal-making moment to reporters with a chuckle, part of a 90-minute interview full of wide-eyed optimism. "He said we can include that in future negotiations.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials probing the alleged massacre of civilians during the Korean War are considering granting an unprecedented blanket immunity for all Americans connected to an incident that witnesses say left hundreds of Koreans dead. By encouraging witness cooperation, an immunity grant would presumably help the government assemble the fullest record of what happened in the South Korean hamlet of No Gun Ri.
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wherever Marines gather, from the tattoo parlors and pool halls outside Camp Pendleton to the quietude of their homes near El Toro, the talk has been the same. And it points increasingly to one thing. "Korea, man. Korea . . . " Lance Cpl. Thomas Babbitt, 26, stationed at Camp Pendleton, said last week. "That's all anyone is talking about."
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