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NEWS
January 27, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials assessing last month's Panama invasion believe that an 11th-hour change of orders could have contributed to the high casualty toll suffered by a group of Navy SEALs in an attack on Punta Paitilla airport, The Times has learned. Only hours before the Panama invasion's "H-hour" on Dec. 20, three commando platoons--about 48 men--were moving secretly toward the airport to destroy Panamanian leader Manuel A.
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NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States and Panama announced that they had failed to negotiate an agreement to permit American troops to remain in Panama beyond the end of the century. The Panama Canal treaties require the departure of the soldiers by Dec. 31, 1999, when control over the waterway reverts to Panama. Since 1997, the two countries had sought to agree on establishing a multinational counternarcotics center in which military personnel from the U.S. and other hemispheric countries would take part.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The General Assembly on Friday denounced the U.S. invasion of Panama by a vote of 75 to 20, with 40 abstentions, in what was seen nonetheless as a surprisingly strong measure of support for Washington. The resolution, sponsored by Cuba and Nicaragua, also called for immediate withdrawal of U.S. forces from Panama.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.S. military's Southern Command staff and their families packed their bags for a new home in Miami on Friday, slipping out quietly after an often-controversial 81-year presence in Panama. The last 250 of a 980-strong contingent of the Pentagon's front-line operations in Latin America and the Caribbean boarded two chartered planes at Howard Air Force Base near the Panama Canal and bid a discreet farewell to Panama.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Twenty-five-year-old Navy Lt. (j.g.) John Patrick Connors, a member of the elite SEALS unit, was not only among the first to volunteer to go to Panama this week to help topple the regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. He was also among the first to die there. Alongside him was Chief Petty Officer Donald Lewis McFaul, a Navy SEAL trained in San Diego. Both were among four specially trained SEALS killed in a fire-fight at a Panama City airport.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heaviest concentration of U.S. Army casualties in the Panama invasion was suffered by an 850-man contingent of Army Rangers whose nighttime parachute assault on a military camp at Rio Hato left one in 18 American soldiers killed or wounded, according to officials and records made available to The Times.
NEWS
December 28, 1989
MARINES Cpl. Garreth C. Isaak First American killed in the invasion, age 22, from Greenville, S.C. ARMY Staff Sgt. Larry R. Barnard Ranger, eight-year Army veteran from Hallstead, Pa., age 29; father of three. Pfc. Vance T. Coates Infantryman from Great Falls, Mont., age 18, completed training at Ft. Benning, Ga., last summer. Sgt. Michael Deblois Member of 508th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Divison, age 24, from Dubach, La. 1st Lt.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rumors that thousands of civilians were killed in last December's U.S. invasion of Panama continue to float through the country, phantoms that live on in the face of official denials, lack of evidence and even the independent findings of respected human rights organizations. Some in Panama and the United States insist that as many as 4,000 Panamanians died in the fighting, most of them civilians. There are allegations of mass graves throughout the country where U.S.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lt. Gen. Carl W. Stiner led the U.S. invasion of Panama last week, few among his admirers and critics were surprised. The three-star Army general may be a slow-talking country boy from eastern Tennessee, but he has been in the center of many high-risk military actions in recent years, including the dramatic capture of the hijackers of the cruise ship Achille Lauro in 1985. "They couldn't have found a better guy to do it," said retired Gen. Edward C. Meyer, former Army chief of staff.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A bomb tossed through the window of a downtown discotheque wounded 16 American servicemen, one seriously, military and hospital officials said Saturday. Eleven Panamanians were also hurt. It is believed to be the first such attack on U.S. servicemen since the United States invaded Panama on Dec. 20 and overthrew the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. Two victims of the blast quoted witnesses of the attack late Friday at the My Place nightclub as saying the attacker shouted "Viva Noriega!"
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 U.S. soldiers suffered mostly minor injuries in two days of riots by rock-throwing Cuban refugees who are increasingly frustrated by their detention in Panama camps, Pentagon officials said here Thursday. The soldiers, most of whom suffered cuts and bruises, were hurt Wednesday night and Thursday when more than 1,000 refugees broke out of three chain-link-enclosed campsites and commandeered military vehicles in an attempt to flee the area near the Panama Canal.
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last year in power, Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega repeatedly appeared to accept a hard-fought deal, brokered with U.S. officials and Panamanian politicians. He would step down, civilians would be allowed to return to government, this nation's long military regime would end. But each time his adversaries thought a deal had been struck, Noriega found a way to renege. Three months after the last talks broke down, as Noriega continued to cling to power, U.S.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cry of protest in Latin America has traditionally been, "Yankees, go home!" In Panama these days, it's, "Yankees, please stay!" As the date approaches for the withdrawal of 10,000 American troops and the closing of U.S. military bases as part of the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, Panamanians are getting cold feet. Nationalist fervor that once demanded an end to American dominance is being replaced by economic reality.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
The United States will reduce its military force in Panama to 6,000 men and women by 1995 and remove them all by 1999, the Pentagon announced Thursday. At present, there are some 10,000 members of the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps stationed there, said Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams. The reductions are part of the process of turning the Panama Canal over to the Republic of Panama on Dec. 31, 1999.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | Reuters
The Panama Supreme Court has dismissed a case in which three Panamanian soldiers were charged with murdering an American serviceman days before the 1989 U.S. invasion, a court spokeswoman said Friday. The Panamanian troops, who were guarding a roadblock near the military headquarters of former strongman Manuel A. Noriega, fired at a car carrying four U.S. soldiers, killing one of them. The court ruled that the U.S.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. soldier was killed and another wounded in Panama on Wednesday in violence sparked by anti-American demonstrations demanding that President Bush cancel his visit to that strategically located country. According to the U.S. Department of Defense and news agency reports from Panama, the soldiers were hit as they rode in a military vehicle near the town of Chilibre, about 30 miles north of Panama City.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning at H-hour--1 a.m. Eastern time Wednesday--the U.S. military fanned across the narrow waist of Panama intent on dismembering the Panamanian military organization that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega has headed for more than six years. By morning, the coordinated assault of more than 20,000 troops--including waves of U.S.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON and BRUCE KEPPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
American companies in Panama shut their offices Wednesday and checked on employees' safety, as the U.S. military's attack sent the Central American nation's deeply troubled economy into chaos. With sporadic fighting continuing, Panama's main airport remained shut to commercial traffic, and the Panama Canal was closed for most of the day, its first combat-related closure in 75 years. A spot check of U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Manuel A. Noriega's defense team can have access to some documents captured during the invasion of Panama, including details of his cooperation with U.S. drug-trafficking probes, a judge ruled in Miami. But U.S. Dist. Judge William M. Hoeveler balked at allowing access to other files, such as those on Cuba. He said he needed more proof that they relate to the deposed Panamanian leader's drug-trafficking case. Defense attorney Frank A.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Public support for keeping U.S. military bases after the year 2000 has risen to 58%, an increase of nearly 17%, in recent months because of concern over loss of jobs, a public opinion poll found. Only 27.8% of Panamanians favor closing the bases. The nationwide poll of 1,017 Panamanians was taken between Feb. 23 and March 3. Under a 1977 treaty, the United States must close its bases before the year 2000. About 10,000 American troops are based in Panama.
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