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United States Armed Forces Panama

NEWS
February 14, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first critical assessment of the Panama invasion since 22,500 U.S. soldiers stormed the streets of Panama City in December, Army officials said Tuesday they have concluded they must increase the training of troops in police functions and urban warfare.
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NEWS
February 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two women helicopter pilots shuttling soldiers into combat during the early hours of the U.S. invasion of Panama came under gunfire so fierce that one of the choppers had to be grounded, Army officials said Thursday. In recognition of their performance under fire, the two have been recommended for the Air Medal with a "V" for valor. They would become the first women to receive the decoration with the valor designation.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave formal approval Wednesday to the first installment of the Bush Administration's new $1 billion aid-to-Panama package, paving the way for signing by the President by the end of the week. Identical versions of the measure cleared both the House and Senate by voice vote, reflecting a desire by members of both parties to speed the aid package to invasion-racked Panama, which has been suffering since 1988 under U.S. economic sanctions.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's pledge to withdraw the remaining U.S. invasion force from Panama by the end of this month will leave the country without adequate military or police protection, American and Panamanian officials say. "It's a very bad idea," said Louis Martinz, a spokesman for President Guillermo Endara. "It's not just a question of not having enough police, but of who they are. The same people who beat us are now supposed to protect us."
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vice President Dan Quayle's three-day peacemaking mission to Latin America ended on a sour note when Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley told him the U.S. invasion of Panama was a violation of international law. "We exchanged views on Panama," Manley said, "and we are friends, but friends do not always agree." Quayle visited Honduras and Panama in addition to Jamaica.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle toured Panama on Sunday in a series of photo opportunities designed, aides said, to demonstrate to the world that the country has returned to normal. Clearly cheered by a series of warm receptions at an open air market, a church and a restaurant overlooking the Pacific, Quayle praised Panamanian support for the U.S. invasion last month that overthrew dictator Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to complete its withdrawal of troops from Panama "in a time period of weeks rather than months," Vice President Dan Quayle assured Latin American leaders Saturday as he began a three-day fence-mending trip to Central America. Speaking to reporters after his first meeting of the day--a breakfast session with President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador--Quayle said he is telling the Latin leaders gathered here for the inauguration of new Honduran President Rafael L.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials assessing last month's Panama invasion believe that an 11th-hour change of orders could have contributed to the high casualty toll suffered by a group of Navy SEALs in an attack on Punta Paitilla airport, The Times has learned. Only hours before the Panama invasion's "H-hour" on Dec. 20, three commando platoons--about 48 men--were moving secretly toward the airport to destroy Panamanian leader Manuel A.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pentagon restored normal duty tours for U.S. troops stationed in Panama. It also encouraged military families to begin returning there as stability is restored after last month's invasion. Beginning June 1, the standard tour of duty will be 36 months for personnel with families and 24 months for single personnel. The tours were shortened during unrest last November, when many dependents returned to the United States.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has turned over to Panamanian authorities 32 former Panama Defense Forces officers and paramilitary leaders held as prisoners of war on a U.S. military base since the invasion of Panama more than a month ago, the U.S. Southern Command announced Monday. The transfer of the prisoners to the Carcel Modelo, a local jail, marked the first step in a process designed to bring to trial in Panamanian courts the lieutenants of Manuel A.
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