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United States Armed Forces Persian Gulf

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NEWS
January 31, 1991 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far back as Fannie Johnson can remember--and that's all the way back to World War I--her family has dutifully heeded the nation's call to arms. "I was little, but I remember my relatives being in that war," said Johnson, sitting erect in her favorite chair by the front window. Fighting in France during the war was Ernest Johnson, a fellow destined to be her first husband.
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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials said Friday that they have no proof that a Navy pilot downed in the 1991 Persian Gulf War is alive but that they believe Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has collected evidence that would solve one of the lingering mysteries of the war. Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher, 33, who was downed on the first day of the air assault on Iraq, was officially reclassified from "killed in action" to "missing in action" this week. Fifteen U.S.
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NEWS
February 8, 1991 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Capt. Bob Swain had just fired two Maverick missiles at Iraqi tanks in central Kuwait when he saw something moving far below, several miles away. "I noticed two black dots running across the desert that looked really different than anything I had seen before," said Swain, an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot. "They weren't putting up any dust and they were moving fast and quickly over the desert." Swain radioed his accompanying observation plane: "Hey, I think I've got a helicopter."
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New research into Gulf War illness released Tuesday has found the first evidence of brain damage in ailing veterans, lending further support to suspicions that toxic chemicals are the cause of a mysterious affliction that has affected more than 30,000 former U.S. troops. Magnetic scans found that veterans with the syndrome have markedly lower concentrations of a key chemical in the brain, according to researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The phone call came to the royal palace in Kuwait city just before 4:30 a.m. It was Princess Mariam Saad al Sabah's brother-in-law. "You have to leave the palace. Go to the summer house," he said when she reached over to her bedside table and picked up the telephone. "He had no time to say why," she recalls. "All I knew was, he is a calm person, and at that time his voice wasn't calm. We left."
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports and
Iranian President Ali Khamenei said Tuesday that his forces will block all oil movement in the Persian Gulf if its tankers are stopped, the Iranian news agency IRNA reported. If Iran fails to export its oil, "there would be no way for any other country to do the same through the waterway," IRNA, monitored in Nicosia, quoted him as saying.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A number of medical professionals, who say they've become ill while treating Gulf War veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat. Doctors, nurses, laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with Gulf War veterans, say they've contracted the same symptoms--fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems--that are generally associated with "Gulf War syndrome."
BUSINESS
February 22, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prompted by escalating complaints over huge phone bills facing families of troops in the Persian Gulf, American Telephone & Telegraph on Thursday slashed its international rates from Saudi Arabia by as much 28%. The move came less than a week after the Federal Communications Commission and a powerful congressman contacted the phone company about severe financial problems encountered by some military families because of long-distance charges from Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the United States and Iraq go to war, the U.S. military plans to unleash a relentless air campaign designed in part to "decapitate" the Iraqi leadership by targeting President Saddam Hussein, his family, his senior commanders, his palace guard and even his mistress, according to senior U.S. military planners.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American soldier whose death during a ground battle in the Persian Gulf War was described in two front-page articles in The Times was killed not by Iraqi forces, as had been believed, but by a mistaken barrage from a U.S. M1-A1 tank, military officials said Wednesday. Army Specialist Clarence Allen Cash, 20, of Ashland, Ohio, was among the 35 U.S. soldiers now acknowledged by the Defense Department to have been killed during the war by so-called "friendly fire."
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pentagon-sponsored study has found grounds to suspect that an experimental nerve gas antidote given to as many as 300,000 U.S. troops during the Persian Gulf War may be a cause of the mysterious "Gulf War syndrome." Contradicting earlier official studies, the two-year analysis by the Rand Corp.--which will be released today--has concluded that the drug pyridostigmine bromide "cannot be excluded as a contributor" to a malady blamed for symptoms afflicting tens of thousands of veterans.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. warplanes bombed an Iraqi communications site in the northern "no-fly" zone after being fired on by Iraqi antiaircraft artillery, a U.S. military statement said. Air Force F-16s and F-15s dropped laser-guided bombs on an intelligence and operations center used by Iraqi forces to process radar information and target allied planes, the U.S. European Command said in a statement. The command is based in Stuttgart, Germany.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S.-British airstrikes in northern Iraq killed one civilian, the official Iraqi News Agency reported. Hadi Khader Daoud of Bertela, 250 miles north of Baghdad, was killed by one of 18 sorties carried out by American and British planes flying in from Turkey, the agency reported, quoting an unidentified spokesman for the Iraqi Air Defense Command. Bertela is about 12 miles east of Mosul, a frequent target of airstrikes and a city Iraq said was hit again. A statement issued by the U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain and the Netherlands plan to introduce a Security Council resolution that could allow foreign oil companies to invest in Iraq if President Saddam Hussein cooperates with U.N. weapons inspectors, and if a team of experts to be assembled by Secretary-General Kofi Annan recommends it. "We want to move full-steam ahead on humanitarian provisions to the people of Iraq," a British diplomat at the U.N. said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | Associated Press
U.S. and British warplanes bombed sites in southern Iraq on Sunday, killing four people and wounding five others, Iraq's air-defense command said. The U.S. Central Command in Florida said coalition aircraft struck three targets in southern Iraq. The planes--U.S. Air Force F-16s--fired precision-guided munitions at radar and communications sites. The attacks were in response to Iraqi antiaircraft artillery fire at coalition planes patrolling the southern "no-fly" zone, Central Command said.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Allied warplanes killed four civilians in northern Iraq, the official Iraqi News Agency reported. The planes struck public utilities and weapons sites in the Mosul region, leading "to the martyrdom of four citizens and the wounding of others," the agency said, quoting the Iraqi armed forces. An American military official in Germany said U.S. warplanes attacked antiaircraft and radar sites after being fired on while patrolling the Western-imposed "no-fly" zone over northern Iraq.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
"Collateral damage." That's the new buzz phrase of the Persian Gulf War. It means the unintended damage to civilians and non-military structures in the target area directly caused by military action. Although the words are new, the awful reality behind them most definitely is not.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
The strategy was launched Aug. 7, just five days after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. It was relentlessly executed through months of U.N. negotiation, six weeks of allied bombing and five days of lightning-fast ground war against experienced Iraqi forces that greatly outnumbered allied combat troops. While pockets of Iraqi resistance remain, the Iraqi army is effectively out of commission. Aug. 7, 1990-Jan.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government will start testing an antibiotic this month as a possible cure for the thousands of veterans who say they suffer from Gulf War syndrome. Thirty military and veterans clinics in the country will offer the antibiotic, based on the theory that the unexplained symptoms are caused by an airborne bacteria and may be contagious. Dr. Charles Engel, director of the Gulf War health center at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, said, "Most people feel relatively comfortable.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | From Associated Press
U.S. warplanes struck back at antiaircraft artillery sites and communications facilities in "no-fly" zones in northern and southern Iraq on Saturday after being targeted by Iraqi air defenses, the U.S. military said. The official Iraqi News Agency said "ungodly criminals" carried out 17 sorties near Mosul, 225 miles north of Baghdad, and 40 sorties in southern Iraq, wounding "a number of people." The report on casualties could not be independently confirmed.
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