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NEWS
January 30, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
When Herbert Iske returned to California after nine grueling months in the Pacific theater in World War II, he assumed the veterans parades and salutes and bands were meant for him too. He was wrong: As a member of the U.S. merchant marine, Iske soon discovered that, in the eyes of his country, he was not a "veteran" of the war at all.
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NEWS
April 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge agreed Thursday to delay until possibly January the espionage trial of a retired Air Force master sergeant accused of plotting to spy for Iraq, China and Libya. The move by U.S. District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee in Alexandria, Va., gives defense lawyers and prosecutors more time to prepare for the unusual death-penalty case against Brian Patrick Regan, 39. The judge will set a new trial date May 3 but advised lawyers to consider Jan. 13 or later.
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NEWS
August 2, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All 23 American prisoners of war captured by Iraqi forces during Operation Desert Storm, including two U.S. servicewomen, were tortured or abused by their captors, a top Defense Department official told U.S. lawmakers Thursday. In several instances, Iraqi interrogators broke bones, perforated eardrums and threatened to shoot or dismember the American prisoners in their custody, Army Col. Bill Jordan said in testimony before Congress' Human Rights Caucus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A second Marine from the base at Twentynine Palms has been charged with posing naked for a gay pornographic Web site that purports to display pictures of naked Marines and other military personnel, officials said Thursday. Staff Sgt. R.E. Borchers has been charged with indecent exposure and faces a court-martial. Second Lt. Douglas W. Shirer, a supply officer, has already been convicted and given 10 months in the brig and a dishonorable discharge for a similar offense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A second Marine from the base at Twentynine Palms has been charged with posing naked for a gay pornographic Web site that purports to display pictures of naked Marines and other military personnel, officials said Thursday. Staff Sgt. R.E. Borchers has been charged with indecent exposure and faces a court-martial. Second Lt. Douglas W. Shirer, a supply officer, has already been convicted and given 10 months in the brig and a dishonorable discharge for a similar offense.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was 18 when he joined the Army, 19 when he was court-martialed and three days past his 26th birthday when he was hanged. It was the only time he ever was in trouble. His birth certificate said he was "colored," and his death certificate said "negroid." Karl Menninger, the renowned Kansas psychiatrist, lobbied the Kennedy White House not to take the life of this "undistinguished epileptic Negro soldier."
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Expanding the scope of the nation's civil rights laws, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that Jews, Arabs and others who suffer discrimination based on their "ancestry" are protected under statutes barring racial discrimination. In two unanimous decisions, the justices concluded that Congress in the original 1866 Civil Rights Act intended not only to protect blacks but also immigrants and others who suffer because of their nationality or appearance.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the far-flung Kansas prairie, in the basement of a prison built by prisoners, six members of the United States Armed Forces await death. More than 30 years have passed since the last soldier was hanged here and the old wooden gallows was taken down, boxed up, removed from memory. Today, a new Death Row holds three soldiers, two Marines and an airman. Down the hall looms a lethal-injection chamber designed to dispatch these men with the push of a needle.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney is preparing to call for the closure of more than 30 major military bases, including a renewed proposal to shut Ft. Ord in Monterey, home of the Army's 7th Infantry Division, a senior Bush Administration official said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Jenkins recalls staring with wide-eyed wonder as one gigantic mushroom cloud after another fanned into the blue skies above the West Pacific's Marshall Islands 33 years ago. At the time, Jenkins, now a custom boat builder, did not realize that the explosions would cast a pall over his life.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2001 | Bloomberg News
TRW Inc.'s automated system for processing the U.S. military's travel orders flunked its first major field test in December, and the Pentagon is now weighing whether to revise or even cancel the $263.7-million project, program documents say. Military personnel at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri said the TRW system is too complicated and slow, forcing them to become "travel clerks." The system is now on hold.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent publicity about the first U.S. casualty of the 1991 Persian Gulf War has loosed an outpouring of new leads in the mysterious case, including information that could support the notion that the flier survived his crash and was taken prisoner by the Iraqis, according to a U.S. lawmaker. Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the leads have come to light since last month, when Navy Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and South Korea agreed Thursday to strengthen Seoul's jurisdiction over GIs charged with murder and rape in a bid to resolve one of the allies' most contentious issues. Under the deal, U.S. military personnel accused in cases of murder and rape as well as arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes will be turned over to South Korea after they are indicted. Currently, the hand-over occurs only if suspects are convicted and all appeals are exhausted.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | Associated Press
U.S. troops in the volatile Yugoslav region of Kosovo shared a festive Christmas feast Monday, but for many the joy of the season was tempered by feelings of homesickness for family and friends. "This is my first Christmas away from home, and I am a bit upset," said Pvt. Christopher Ruffin, 18, of Stockton, Texas. "I spent last night trying to get hold of my family and my girlfriend. I have not yet been able to get them to wish them Merry Christmas." His colleague Spc. Paul H.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. and South Korean negotiators have reached a "mutual understanding" that American soldiers killed South Korean civilian refugees in the early weeks of the Korean War, but they left unresolved the question of how many died, a Clinton administration official said Friday. The talks, which ended Thursday in Seoul with no publicly announced result, produced agreement from both sides that U.S.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A yearlong Pentagon investigation has concluded that American soldiers panicked and fired into a crowd of unarmed refugees near the South Korean village of No Gun Ri in the early days of the Korean War, but it did not find conclusive evidence that the troops had orders to shoot civilians, a Defense Department official and others involved with the inquiry said. The Pentagon's still-unpublished draft report, based on more than 100 interviews with U.S.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle over ATM surcharges has opened on yet another front, and it could present the banking industry with its most formidable opponent ever: the U.S. military. The Defense Department has entered the fray over the $1 to $3 that banks charge non-customers for using their automated teller machines, proposing a new rule that would prohibit banks operating on military bases from assessing the fees. The rule could affect dozens of U.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Risking their military careers, five gay and lesbian members of the armed forces--including two from Southern California--publicly revealed their sexual orientation when they filed suit Tuesday challenging a new Pentagon policy that automatically expels military personnel who disclose they are homosexuals. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court here, comes as Congress is moving ahead to codify a policy changing the status of homosexuals in the military.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | Associated Press
A parliamentary committee on Tuesday called on the United States to conduct an open, objective probe of the alleged killing of Korean civilians by GIs in the early weeks of the Korean War. A resolution signed by 36 legislators was approved by the National Assembly's Defense Committee with a unanimous vote. It was expected to be approved by the full National Assembly later this week, lawmakers said. Washington and Seoul launched separate investigations after the Associated Press, citing both U.S.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Democrats and Republicans fought vote by vote, postmark by postmark Friday as Florida's 67 county canvassing boards tallied overseas ballots that appeared to be padding Texas Gov. George W. Bush's microscopic lead over Vice President Al Gore.
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