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NEWS
April 23, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard R. Rich hasn't spoken to his father in 33 years. But in a couple months, if all goes well, the son will reopen the conversation with a single word--goodbye. Rich's father is U.S. Navy Cmdr. Richard Rich, whose F-4B Phantom was shot down 20 miles southwest of Hanoi on May 19, 1967. The aircraft's radarman ejected and was captured, raising hopes that Rich had survived the crash as well. But Rich's father was never heard from, and the Navy classified him as missing in action.
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NEWS
April 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Serbs angry over the arrest of a Serb for illegal weapons possession clashed Tuesday with NATO peacekeepers in Kosovo, injuring 11 Americans, one Pole and a translator, the U.S. military said. The independent Yugoslav news agency Beta said 14 Serbs were also hurt, including 10 who were struck by rubber bullets fired in an attempt to break up a Serbian crowd. However, the U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
An Air Force major was discharged Thursday, ending his fight against an order to take an anthrax vaccine. Maj. Sonnie Bates, 35, had initially faced a court-martial for refusing an order. He was believed to have been the highest-ranking officer in the Air Force to face a court-martial for refusing an order to take the vaccine. Bates, a pilot at Dover Air Force Base, said the vaccine could jeopardize his health. The Pentagon says it is safe.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials conceded Friday that they have uncovered a "disturbing" level of gay harassment in the U.S. military and ordered a new effort to implement and enforce the controversial policy governing treatment of homosexuals. Officials released a Pentagon inspector general's survey of 72,000 troops around the world that found 37% have witnessed or been targets of gay harassment directed at service members.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | From the Washington Post
In the next few months, every member of the armed forces, from private to general, is supposed to undergo instruction to stop harassment of gays in uniform. But the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines have prepared widely differing, sometimes contradictory and often perfunctory lessons. Everyone in the Navy, for example, will see a slide show that begins with sailors working heroically together as wind-whipped waves crash around their ship.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
An American soldier serving with the international peacekeeping force in Kosovo was charged Sunday with sexually assaulting and killing an 11-year-old ethnic Albanian girl, the U.S. military announced. Staff Sgt. Frank J. Ronghi is accused of murder and indecent acts with a child, Col. Ellis Golson told reporters. It is the first time a peacekeeper from any country has been accused of such serious crimes since the 50,000-strong NATO-led peacekeeping force entered the province June 12.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mounting strains on the U.S. armed forces are undermining the troops' morale, shaking their confidence in the top leadership and stirring concern about the quality of new recruits and basic training, according to a survey of 12,000 officers and enlisted personnel. The study found that, in a decade that has seen a shrunken military struggle with a substantial increase in overseas deployments, many officers and enlisted personnel have lost faith in their leaders' ability to cope.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | Times News Services
Republican presidential candidate John McCain said Sunday that there was no reason an avowed homosexual could not serve as president someday, but he opposed openly gay people serving in the military. In a telephone interview with Reuters, the Arizona senator said a candidate's religion or sexual orientation should not be a bar to the presidency. "People make judgments based on a candidate's qualifications," he said. "I don't think that would rule anybody out."
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore said Monday that, if elected president, he would end the ban on acknowledged gays and lesbians serving in the nation's military forces. Stepping directly into a controversy with which President Clinton wrestled unsuccessfully at the start of his presidency seven years ago--and tried to resolve with a compromise that he acknowledged just last weekend was a failure--Gore said the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy should be eliminated.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton scored with the gay community Thursday, saying she doesn't support the "don't ask, don't tell" policy intended to make it easier for gays and lesbians to serve in the military. She then stepped into the middle of a local controversy by saying she'd march in the St. Patrick's Day Parade. The parade excludes the Irish Lesbian and Gay Organization, and many Democratic politicians steer clear of it.
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