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NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Puerto Rico accused the Navy of conducting bombing exercises that blew apart endangered coral reefs and littered them with debris. The island government formally complained to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and requested intervention. While the task force has no legal authority to stop bombings, it can mediate and make recommendations. Puerto Rico based its allegation on a May survey of the reefs around the island of Vieques.
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NEWS
August 9, 2000 | Associated Press
The U.S. Navy detained 11 more protesters Tuesday, all youths who broke into its training ground to try to stop military exercises on the outlying island of Vieques, a spokesman said. The protesters cut through a fence and were caught by military police about 5:30 a.m., spokesman Jeff Gordon said. He said the detainees were members of a youth group, but he was unsure of their ages.
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NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
A presidential panel on Monday recommended that the Navy be allowed to resume practice bombing on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques--over the objections of the local population and the Puerto Rican government--but that it prepare to abandon the island within five years. The recommendation drew immediate protest in Puerto Rico, where sentiment against the Navy has been growing since a civilian security guard was killed in a bombing accident in April.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | Associated Press
Chanting "No to the Navy!" thousands of Puerto Ricans rallied in the capital Sunday to protest new U.S. military exercises on the outlying island of Vieques. Jets from the carrier Harry S. Truman began dropping dummy bombs Thursday, and ships will shell the island later this month. About 5,000 protesters marched peacefully in 90-degree heat outside Ft. Buchanan, an Army base in suburban San Juan. Organizers urged activists to redouble their yearlong effort to force out the Navy.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | Associated Press
Chanting "No to the Navy!" thousands of Puerto Ricans rallied in the capital Sunday to protest new U.S. military exercises on the outlying island of Vieques. Jets from the carrier Harry S. Truman began dropping dummy bombs Thursday, and ships will shell the island later this month. About 5,000 protesters marched peacefully in 90-degree heat outside Ft. Buchanan, an Army base in suburban San Juan. Organizers urged activists to redouble their yearlong effort to force out the Navy.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bombed, shelled and invaded in military training exercises for 58 years, a tiny, palm-fringed Puerto Rican island is now the site of a fierce battle entangling the White House, the Pentagon, and the campaigns of Vice President Al Gore and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | Associated Press
The U.S. Navy detained 11 more protesters Tuesday, all youths who broke into its training ground to try to stop military exercises on the outlying island of Vieques, a spokesman said. The protesters cut through a fence and were caught by military police about 5:30 a.m., spokesman Jeff Gordon said. He said the detainees were members of a youth group, but he was unsure of their ages.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Puerto Rico accused the Navy of conducting bombing exercises that blew apart endangered coral reefs and littered them with debris. The island government formally complained to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and requested intervention. While the task force has no legal authority to stop bombings, it can mediate and make recommendations. Puerto Rico based its allegation on a May survey of the reefs around the island of Vieques.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
A presidential panel on Monday recommended that the Navy be allowed to resume practice bombing on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques--over the objections of the local population and the Puerto Rican government--but that it prepare to abandon the island within five years. The recommendation drew immediate protest in Puerto Rico, where sentiment against the Navy has been growing since a civilian security guard was killed in a bombing accident in April.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bombed, shelled and invaded in military training exercises for 58 years, a tiny, palm-fringed Puerto Rican island is now the site of a fierce battle entangling the White House, the Pentagon, and the campaigns of Vice President Al Gore and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.
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