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NEWS
July 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
The first U.S. troops landed in the Rwandan capital Saturday to secure the airport for an expanded international aid effort. The next step is encouraging millions of scared, displaced people to return home. President Clinton on Friday ordered 200 U.S. soldiers to Kigali to support the relief effort in Rwanda, where millions have fled their homes to escape ethnic carnage that killed up to 500,000 people. Defense Secretary William J. Perry was scheduled to inspect the U.S. aid mission today. Lt.
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NEWS
August 3, 1994 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Schroeder, a ramrod-straight soldier with a closely shaved head and a razor-sharp manner, paused only once in his rapid-fire answers to a gaggle of reporters at a recent briefing here. Schroeder, head of the task force running Operation Support Hope, the U.S. attempt to alleviate the suffering of more than 1 million Rwandan refugees, said he was considering using an American truck company to transport food and refugees in Rwanda.
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NEWS
August 2, 1994 | from Reuters
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Monday on his return from Africa that he is more hopeful about an international effort to save millions of Rwandan refugees and that only 3,000 U.S. troops will be needed to support the humanitarian operation. The troop estimate, given to reporters at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, was lower than the 4,000 Americans that he earlier predicted would be stationed near Rwanda by the end of this week.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | from Reuters
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Monday on his return from Africa that he is more hopeful about an international effort to save millions of Rwandan refugees and that only 3,000 U.S. troops will be needed to support the humanitarian operation. The troop estimate, given to reporters at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, was lower than the 4,000 Americans that he earlier predicted would be stationed near Rwanda by the end of this week.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after President Clinton announced an "immediate and massive" increase in aid to alleviate the suffering of the 1.2 million Rwandan refugees here, deliveries of American relief supplies have barely begun and the operation appears marred by woeful confusion and delay. Despite a growing buildup of supplies in distant depots, only a trickle of emergency aid sent under "Operation Support Hope" has reached the sick and exhausted refugees.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton ordered 200 U.S. troops to Rwanda on Friday to reopen the airport in Kigali, the nation's capital. Officials insisted that American forces will be used solely for humanitarian aid and will not be drawn into peacekeeping operations. "The United States must do more," Clinton said at a White House news conference earlier in the day.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive humanitarian relief operation that President Clinton has ordered for the Central African country of Rwanda is presenting the military with one of its most daunting logistic challenges in recent memory, Pentagon officials said Friday. The sheer physical task of moving thousands of tons of desperately needed food, medicine and other supplies goes beyond anything American forces faced in Somalia or Saudi Arabia. To get aid to landlocked Rwanda, U.S.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States would face high-risk tactical and logistic problems in trying to mount a military rescue operation to evacuate about 255 Americans trapped in Rwanda, defense analysts said Friday. The biggest difficulty would be determining how to get a sizable enough contingent there quickly. The only U.S. military forces near Rwanda are about 2,200 Marines aboard the amphibious assault ship Peleliu now sailing off the coast of Somalia.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Schroeder, a ramrod-straight soldier with a closely shaved head and a razor-sharp manner, paused only once in his rapid-fire answers to a gaggle of reporters at a recent briefing here. Schroeder, head of the task force running Operation Support Hope, the U.S. attempt to alleviate the suffering of more than 1 million Rwandan refugees, said he was considering using an American truck company to transport food and refugees in Rwanda.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said after an inspection here Sunday that U.S. soldiers may be deployed for "a year or longer" to help more than 1 million Rwandan refugees facing death and disease in nightmarish camps along the Zairian border. Perry said that the 1,000 Americans now deployed in Zaire, Rwanda, Kenya and Uganda as part of Operation Support Hope are on "a humanitarian mission" to alleviate the suffering of the refugees and to help them return home.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said after an inspection here Sunday that U.S. soldiers may be deployed for "a year or longer" to help more than 1 million Rwandan refugees facing death and disease in nightmarish camps along the Zairian border. Perry said that the 1,000 Americans now deployed in Zaire, Rwanda, Kenya and Uganda as part of Operation Support Hope are on "a humanitarian mission" to alleviate the suffering of the refugees and to help them return home.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
The first U.S. troops landed in the Rwandan capital Saturday to secure the airport for an expanded international aid effort. The next step is encouraging millions of scared, displaced people to return home. President Clinton on Friday ordered 200 U.S. soldiers to Kigali to support the relief effort in Rwanda, where millions have fled their homes to escape ethnic carnage that killed up to 500,000 people. Defense Secretary William J. Perry was scheduled to inspect the U.S. aid mission today. Lt.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton ordered 200 U.S. troops to Rwanda on Friday to reopen the airport in Kigali, the nation's capital. Officials insisted that American forces will be used solely for humanitarian aid and will not be drawn into peacekeeping operations. "The United States must do more," Clinton said at a White House news conference earlier in the day.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive humanitarian relief operation that President Clinton has ordered for the Central African country of Rwanda is presenting the military with one of its most daunting logistic challenges in recent memory, Pentagon officials said Friday. The sheer physical task of moving thousands of tons of desperately needed food, medicine and other supplies goes beyond anything American forces faced in Somalia or Saudi Arabia. To get aid to landlocked Rwanda, U.S.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after President Clinton announced an "immediate and massive" increase in aid to alleviate the suffering of the 1.2 million Rwandan refugees here, deliveries of American relief supplies have barely begun and the operation appears marred by woeful confusion and delay. Despite a growing buildup of supplies in distant depots, only a trickle of emergency aid sent under "Operation Support Hope" has reached the sick and exhausted refugees.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending at least 2,000 U.S. troops to Rwanda to help set up a relief network for refugees returning from Zaire, but the President still has not made a final decision on the plan, senior officials said Wednesday. The action is awaiting a U.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending at least 2,000 U.S. troops to Rwanda to help set up a relief network for refugees returning from Zaire, but the President still has not made a final decision on the plan, senior officials said Wednesday. The action is awaiting a U.S.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States would face high-risk tactical and logistic problems in trying to mount a military rescue operation to evacuate about 255 Americans trapped in Rwanda, defense analysts said Friday. The biggest difficulty would be determining how to get a sizable enough contingent there quickly. The only U.S. military forces near Rwanda are about 2,200 Marines aboard the amphibious assault ship Peleliu now sailing off the coast of Somalia.
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