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NEWS
August 13, 1990
En route to Mediterranean: Aircraft carrier Saratoga, the battleship Wisconsin, one guided-missile cruiser and other support ships. Red Sea: Aircraft carrier Eisenhower, one guided-missile cruiser, one guided-missile destroyer and other support ships. Persian Gulf: The command ship LaSalle, two guided-missile cruisers, three guided-missile frigates and other U.S. Navy support ships. Also, one British destroyer and two French frigates.
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NEWS
June 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. investigation of a 1996 terrorist bombing that killed 19 American servicemen in Saudi Arabia has languished due to mutual mistrust, the New York Times has reported. The newspaper said FBI Director Louis J. Freeh has quietly pulled out dozens of agents the agency sent to investigate the truck bombing. The June 1996 blast occurred at the Khobar Towers apartment complex after a fuel truck carrying tons of explosives detonated outside.
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NEWS
February 26, 1991 | BOB DROGIN and PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flaming debris from an Iraqi Scud missile slammed into a makeshift barracks full of U.S. troops near here Monday night, killing at least 27 soldiers and injuring 98 in a fierce explosion and fire, according to the U.S. military Central Command in Riyadh. Eyewitnesses said a Patriot missile had intercepted the Scud overhead, but U.S. military officials in Riyadh said they could not confirm that a Patriot had been launched. "Why did the Patriot have to hit it?"
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was no foreign involvement in the June 1996 bombing that killed 19 U.S. military personnel at their Khobar Towers housing complex in Dhahran in eastern Saudi Arabia, the Saudi interior minister said Friday. The statement, the first definitive Saudi finding in a nearly two year investigation, seemed to rule out earlier hints that Iran or the Iranian-backed Hezbollah movement in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley had played a role in the worst anti-U.S. terrorist attack in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the heavy hand of the Iraqi invaders, Kuwait city is a lawless capital of increasing desperation, according to refugees who have reached the safety of Bahrain. Only in the past week have Iraqi police officers been deployed on the city's streets, said one refugee who arrived in Bahrain over the weekend. "Very few people are venturing out of their homes," he said. "The looting continues--some by the Iraqis, some by Arab and Asian workers. They even hit the Pizza Hut."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1990 | CAROLINE DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and family gathered Saturday in West Covina at an emotional funeral service for Air Force Staff Sgt. John Francis Campisi, the first U.S. serviceman to die in the Persian Gulf since the current troop buildup began. An estimated 300 mourners heard Campisi remembered as a peacemaker and a career serviceman who was willing to make sacrifices for his family, friends and country.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The heads of more than 40 Muslim nations have consulted with Saudi Arabia and expressed approval of its conduct last week when Iranian extremists apparently sparked a riot in the holy city of Mecca that left more than 400 dead and 600 injured, the Saudi ambassador to the United States said Thursday. At the same time, Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
Horner is responsible for coordinating the air assault on Iraq and Kuwait . Age: 54, born in Davenport, Iowa. Education: BA, University of Iowa; MBA, College of William and Mary Career: Entered service as second lieutenant in 1958, combat pilot in Vietnam, achieved command as lieutenant general in 1987.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, before a dinner honoring him in Kuwait, the general's hosts had suggested that appropriate dress would be the traditional dishdasha robe and he had thought to himself, "Holy smokes, Schwarzkopf is going to dress up like the Kuwaitis and all the Arabs are going to say, 'Who the hell does this guy think he is?' " The general, though, was easily persuaded, and before dinner he took possession of a splendid embroidered dishdasha delivered to his hotel room.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Cpl. James Binnebose was not meant to be in that barracks in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. He was a Californian, housed by chance among Pennsylvanians. He was meant to be gone that night but his mission was canceled. So he was padding back from a shower when the Scud hit. The Feb. 25 blast by the Iraqi missile blew off his shower shoes and threw him 20 feet from where he had been walking, along the outside wall of the barracks. He came to, seeing everything in black and red.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States ordered the deportation Thursday of Hani Abdel Rahim Hussein Sayegh, the dissident linked by Saudi and American officials to the 1996 bombing that killed 19 U.S. Air Force personnel stationed in Saudi Arabia. The decision may mark the formal collapse of a high-drama case that once appeared to offer Washington its only promising independent lead in solving the attack and in determining whether any foreign powers were involved.
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Hani Abdel Rahim Hussein Sayegh, being held in Ottawa as a suspect in last summer's bombing attack that killed 19 American service personnel in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, has expressed interest in cooperating with U.S. authorities because he fears torture and execution await him in Saudi Arabia, sources said. Sayegh, identified in Canadian court documents as the driver of a car that gave a go-ahead signal for the bombing, is being held pending a decision on the country to which he will be deported.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government issued a conditional order for the deportation of a Saudi dissident wanted for questioning by the United States in a bombing that killed 19 U.S. airmen in Saudi Arabia in June. An immigration official said Hani Abdel Rahim Sayegh will be deported once the government decides where to send him. The leading choices are Saudi Arabia and the United States. A federal judge ruled May 5 that there is conclusive evidence that Sayegh is a terrorist and should be deported.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | Washington Post
U.S. and Saudi intelligence authorities have linked a senior Iranian government official to a group of Shiite Muslims suspected of bombing an American military compound in Saudi Arabia last year, according to U.S. and Arab officials. Intelligence information indicates that Brig. Ahmad Sherifi, a senior Iranian intelligence officer and a top official in Iran's Revolutionary Guard, met about two years before the bombing with a Saudi Shiite arrested last month in Canada, the officials said.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration has issued a diplomatic warning to Moscow about Russian assistance to Iran's missile program--aid that could threaten U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia, several Persian Gulf allies and Israel, senior administration officials say. Intelligence reports indicate that Russia recently transferred to Iran technology for the Russian SS-4 missile, which has a range almost three times greater than that of any missile now in Iran's arsenal.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | From the Washington Post
U.S. military personnel in Saudi Arabia are operating under the threat of imminent terrorist attack, not only from huge car bombs and chemical weapons but also from a possible new threat, powerful mortars that can fire projectiles long distances, Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Saturday. About 700 school-age children and other family members of U.S. military personnel are being ordered to leave Saudi Arabia to reduce the size of the American military community in Riyadh, the capital.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Reuters
"Baghdad lit up like a Christmas tree," the commander of the U.S. "Wild Weasel" pilots told reporters after a four-hour mission over the Iraqi capital early Thursday. "I saw the most fantastic fireworks demonstration," said Lt. Col. George Walton, the squadron's commander, as he stepped down from his F-4G plane. Walton, a native of San Antonio, Tex., said all 12 planes in his squadron returned safely after attacking launchers for surface-to-air missiles (SAMs).
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American commanders have warned Army doctors that some front-line U.S. combat units can be expected to suffer casualties of 10% over 30 days under current plans for a ground offensive against Iraq, according to officers familiar with the official estimate.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | ART PINE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The decision not to allow American commanders to widen the security perimeter around a Dhahran military compound before last week's truck-bomb explosion was made by a low-level Saudi Arabian official and was not passed on to Pentagon higher-ups, U.S. officials said Monday. The comments came a day after Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that he will push for Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As President Clinton paid tribute Sunday to the "quiet American heroes" killed last week in a terrorist bombing in Saudi Arabia, the Republican chairman of a key Senate committee said Defense Secretary William J. Perry should resign if lax security contributed to the tragedy. Participating in emotional memorial services at two Florida bases for the 19 airmen killed by a massive truck bomb in Dhahran, Clinton told grieving families, "We stand with you in sorrow and in outrage."
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