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NEWS
December 5, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite reassurances from the Bosnian government, the Clinton administration is deeply concerned about the status of more than 200 Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Bosnia who are considered a major threat to the safety of American troops, senior U.S. officials said Monday. The Iranians have played a significant role in training Bosnian Muslims and Muslims from other countries who fought in the 3 1/2-year civil war.
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NEWS
October 24, 2000 | Associated Press
U.S. forces in Turkey and two small Persian Gulf states have been placed on heightened alert because of new indications of terrorist threats in the region, a senior defense official said Monday. The official, who discussed the matter on condition of anonymity, described the move as precautionary. "The reason it was done was the receipt of specific threats . . . but from sources whose credibility is unknown," the official said.
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NEWS
July 2, 1996 | ART PINE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The decision not to allow American commanders to widen the security perimeter around a Dhahran military compound before last week's truck-bomb explosion was made by a low-level Saudi Arabian official and was not passed on to Pentagon higher-ups, U.S. officials said Monday. The comments came a day after Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that he will push for Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | ART PINE and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saudi Arabia agreed Wednesday to let U.S. military officials relocate more than 4,000 American troops in that country in hopes of preventing more terrorist attacks, pledging to pay half the estimated $200-million cost. The accord, announced jointly here and in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, followed two days of negotiations between Defense Secretary William J. Perry and top Saudi officials, including the country's reigning monarch, King Fahd.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry and top military commanders told a Senate committee Tuesday that they had underestimated the threat of terrorism before last month's deadly truck-bomb attack in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, and that as many as 50 other U.S. installations in the Middle East and southern Asia are at least as vulnerable. In an often intense grilling from senators, Perry, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman John M. Shalikashvili and Gen. J. H. Binford Peay III, chief of U.S.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | Associated Press
U.S. forces in Turkey and two small Persian Gulf states have been placed on heightened alert because of new indications of terrorist threats in the region, a senior defense official said Monday. The official, who discussed the matter on condition of anonymity, described the move as precautionary. "The reason it was done was the receipt of specific threats . . . but from sources whose credibility is unknown," the official said.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon said Wednesday that it is developing emergency plans--likely to cost billions of dollars--to protect U.S. troops abroad against new kinds of terrorist attacks, ranging from large truck bombs to chemical and biological weapons.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | ART PINE and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saudi Arabia agreed Wednesday to let U.S. military officials relocate more than 4,000 American troops in that country in hopes of preventing more terrorist attacks, pledging to pay half the estimated $200-million cost. The accord, announced jointly here and in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, followed two days of negotiations between Defense Secretary William J. Perry and top Saudi officials, including the country's reigning monarch, King Fahd.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Saudi Arabia are close to an agreement in principle to move many American troops from Dhahran and Riyadh to a remote air base in the desert where they will be cut off from security threats, according to senior Pentagon and Saudi officials. The major obstacle is determining who will pay for expanding housing and other facilities at the unfinished Al Kharj air base. The Clinton administration wants the Saudi government to foot most of the bill.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon said Wednesday that it is developing emergency plans--likely to cost billions of dollars--to protect U.S. troops abroad against new kinds of terrorist attacks, ranging from large truck bombs to chemical and biological weapons.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry and top military commanders told a Senate committee Tuesday that they had underestimated the threat of terrorism before last month's deadly truck-bomb attack in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, and that as many as 50 other U.S. installations in the Middle East and southern Asia are at least as vulnerable. In an often intense grilling from senators, Perry, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman John M. Shalikashvili and Gen. J. H. Binford Peay III, chief of U.S.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Saudi Arabia are close to an agreement in principle to move many American troops from Dhahran and Riyadh to a remote air base in the desert where they will be cut off from security threats, according to senior Pentagon and Saudi officials. The major obstacle is determining who will pay for expanding housing and other facilities at the unfinished Al Kharj air base. The Clinton administration wants the Saudi government to foot most of the bill.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | ART PINE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The decision not to allow American commanders to widen the security perimeter around a Dhahran military compound before last week's truck-bomb explosion was made by a low-level Saudi Arabian official and was not passed on to Pentagon higher-ups, U.S. officials said Monday. The comments came a day after Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that he will push for Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite reassurances from the Bosnian government, the Clinton administration is deeply concerned about the status of more than 200 Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Bosnia who are considered a major threat to the safety of American troops, senior U.S. officials said Monday. The Iranians have played a significant role in training Bosnian Muslims and Muslims from other countries who fought in the 3 1/2-year civil war.
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