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United States Armed Forces Somalia

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NEWS
September 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
U.S. Army Rangers hunting for fugitive warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid scored their first major success Tuesday by capturing his chief aide. United Nations military spokesman Maj. David B. Stockwell called Osman Atto's arrest "a significant milestone in dismantling the Aidid militia." The militia is blamed for killing more than 50 U.N. peacekeepers and plaguing the effort to rescue Somalia from famine and civil war. About 50 helicopter-borne elite Rangers took part in the operation.
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NEWS
October 2, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Green Beret captain says U.S. commandos in Somalia routinely dressed in Canadian uniforms and passed themselves off as Canadian troops. Defense Minister David M. Collenette described the claim as "very unusual" and told Parliament that military headquarters would investigate whether Canadian military procedure was breached. News agencies quoted retired Green Beret Capt. Dan Alvis as saying U.S. commandos in Somalia routinely masqueraded as Canadians.
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NEWS
March 7, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Marine sniper team peered through gun sights atop the Empire State merchant ship Sunday afternoon, scanning the horizon of a city slipping deeper into chaos by the day, as 277 American soldiers flanked by the high-powered cannons of two Bradley fighting vehicles quietly marched up the gangplank. On Tuesday, another ship will dock at Mogadishu's seaport, the Greek cruise ship Mediterranean Sky. Also amid strict security, more than 500 U.S.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dry heat of the Santa Ana winds the second-grade class from Palmyra Elementary School waited patiently Monday morning. Sweaty but excited, the children lined up neatly, each clutching an American flag or a balloon. When they saw the helicopters descend at the Tustin Marine Corps Helicopter Air Station, the 7- and 8-year-olds started screaming and clapping. Their pen pal, Gunnery Sgt. Mike Tullous, and 220 other Marines and sailors had finally come home.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general who will command American and U.N. forces in Somalia is a square-jawed Marine whose face became a familiar sight to millions of television viewers during Operation Desert Storm. Lt. Gen. Robert B. Johnston, 55, spent the Persian Gulf War as chief of staff to Desert Storm commander H. Norman Schwarzkopf and conducted most of the televised daily briefings that kept Americans up to date on the battle against Iraqi forces. But Johnston's TV appearances were only a small part of his job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Upon completing basic training last summer at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., Pvt. David J. Conner had two choices for his specialty in the U.S. Army: upholstery or truck driving. Conner, 19, chose to follow his father and half brother as a truck driver, even though he planned a career in architecture after finishing his military service. "A truck driver can work anywhere," explained Greg Sullivan, Conner's half brother.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With jets and helicopters roaring overhead, a U.S.-led convoy of troops, armored cars and high-tech weapons rumbled into this besieged city in the heart of southern Somalia's famine zone early today, seeking to bring peace, hope and food. The deployment, which moved northwest from Mogadishu through rural brushland and past camel herds, was the largest since Operation Restore Hope began with a massive beach landing in Mogadishu a week ago.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the edge of Medina market, about a block from the perimeter of the main military compound America is leaving behind, Mahmoud Mohamed sat at a battered metal table, selling the last of the American garbage that has fed his family and tens of thousands of others for more than a year. They are the leavings of U.S. military MREs--Meals Ready to Eat.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Snipers wounded two U.S. soldiers in the Somali capital Monday, and a Defense Department spokesman in Washington said both were in stable condition. The soldiers, who were not identified, were undergoing treatment at the main U.S. field hospital in Mogadishu. "The two were U.S. Army military policemen. One was hit in the arm and the other in the hand," Navy Lt. Cmdr. Joe Gradisher said. Meanwhile, at the heavily guarded U.N.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marine sharpshooters scanned the horizon from sandbagged machine gun nests atop the gutted U.S. Embassy here Tuesday as U.S. special envoy Robert B. Oakley bade farewell to Somalia and the 16,000 American troops he will leave behind today with the first official declaration of success and a personal confession of just one regret. During a brief ceremony under Mogadishu's blistering sun, U.S.
NEWS
April 19, 1995 | Associated Press
U.S. intelligence documents were mishandled by both U.N. and American officials during the military pullout from Somalia, but no major security breach seems to have occurred, the Pentagon said Tuesday. But U.S. officials demanded "corrective action," saying they cannot be certain that some type of security leak did not occur in the release of documents to the U.N. Operation in Somalia, or UNOSOM. Improvements must be made in the way U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marines began returning Tuesday to Camp Pendleton from Somalia, saying they were proud they were able to safely evacuate the United Nations force from that war-torn country but disappointed to leave behind a nation perilously close to anarchy. "We did what we had to do, but it's a little rough to leave when so much needs doing," said Staff Sgt. Stephen Gallegos as he embraced his wife, Phyllis. "It's real sad over there."
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps because they arrived so tightly wound and trod so warily, U.S. Marines accomplished the evacuation of U.N. forces from this land without loss of American life. But their nervous caution took its toll on Somalis. In the final stages of the troops' retreat, every bullet fired against them was answered, it seemed, by 100. And after killing five Somalis, some for shooting in the direction of Americans and others for just appearing to be threatening, the U.S.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their fingers crossed in hopes of avoiding a repeat of bloodshed here, U.S. Marines splashed ashore in Somalia early today to conclude a misadventure that hardened America's heart to troubles in far-off corners of the globe and deepened its doubts about being the world's policeman.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their fingers crossed in hopes of avoiding a repeat of bloodshed here, U.S. Marines splashed ashore in Somalia early today to conclude a misadventure that hardened America's heart to troubles in far-off corners of the globe and deepened its doubts about being the world's policeman.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
The U.S. Marine general commanding an operation to remove the last U.N. troops from Somalia said Saturday that preparations for a protective force to come ashore were almost complete. "There are very few things to work out, and what's left is very minor. . . . It's a very complex operation," Lt. Gen. Anthony Zinni told reporters at a U.N. military base just outside Mogadishu, the Somali capital.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey you! Lie down! Lie down!" the young Marine shouted, pointing an assault rifle at Ahmed Hussein Fidow's head when it popped up, ever so briefly, to welcome U.S. Marines ashore here. It was Dec. 9, 1992, which seems a lifetime ago--the opening night of a year that went so wrong. But in a little-known scene that was to foreshadow so much, the Marine's warning wasn't enough. "Welcome Marines! Welcome in Mogadishu!" Fidow persisted from his prone position.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their fingers crossed in hopes of avoiding a repeat of bloodshed here, U.S. Marines splashed ashore in Somalia early today to conclude a misadventure that hardened America's heart to troubles in far-off corners of the globe and deepened its doubts about being the world's policeman.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Marine sergeant was lost and presumed dead Monday after the helicopter he was aboard crashed in the Indian Ocean as American forces prepared for the dangerous mission of evacuating the last of U.N. forces in Somalia. The U.S. Naval Forces Central Command said the Marine Corps UH-1N Huey was lifting off from the Essex, a multipurpose amphibious assault ship, about 25 miles southeast of the Somali capital of Mogadishu and crashed into the sea 100 yards from the ship.
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines will take a page from police crowd-control procedures when they help evacuate United Nations soldiers and remaining American military equipment from Somalia during the next several weeks. Besides M-16 rifles and armored personnel carriers, the Marines will use an array of non-lethal weapons ranging from pellet grenades that discourage would-be rioters by stinging them to special new sticky foam that snares rioters like a high-tech lasso.
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