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United States Armed Forces South America

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NEWS
February 8, 1989
The Bush Administration is preparing a major drug interdiction plan that will put "several hundred" U.S. troops in South America to destroy drug laboratories, NBC News reported. Citing unidentified Pentagon officials, NBC reported that the troops would be Special Operations commandos who will be placed in several South American nations.
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NEWS
July 2, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet escalation of U.S. military operations in South America, small groups of American soldiers are leading drug-war training patrols in the jungles of Peru, Colombia and Bolivia, according to U.S. officials. At the same time, overflights by American intelligence planes have been stepped up sharply in an effort to search out drug laboratories and monitor traffickers' communications.
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NEWS
July 2, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet escalation of U.S. military operations in South America, small groups of American soldiers are leading drug-war training patrols in the jungles of Peru, Colombia and Bolivia, according to U.S. officials. At the same time, overflights by American intelligence planes have been stepped up sharply in an effort to search out drug laboratories and monitor traffickers' communications.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
NEWS
February 9, 1989
President Bush and a Pentagon official denied any plans to send U.S. troops to destroy South American drug laboratories, but Bush said he wouldn't rule it out in the future. Asked about an NBC News report that such an effort was being prepared, Bush said: "Nobody's discussed that with me," and added that he is "very wary of committing U.S. troops overseas." He said he would never take such action "until I've given it a lot of thought."
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