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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1989 | CARLA RIVERA and MICHAEL CICCHESE, Times Staff Writers
A Santa Ana man was among 15 Marines injured in the fatal crash of a military helicopter in South Korea, but his family said Tuesday that the serviceman is in good spirits and is expected to recover quickly from his injuries. The Marine Corps on Tuesday released the names of 34 servicemen killed or injured in the crash Monday of a military helicopter in South Korea, including eight from California.
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NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A new accord that gives South Korea more jurisdiction over U.S. soldiers accused of crimes has gone into effect. The revised treaty allows U.S. soldiers accused of murder, rape, arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes to be turned over to South Korean police upon indictment. The accord replaces an earlier agreement under which indicted soldiers remained in U.S. military custody until they were convicted in the South Korean judicial system and all appeals were exhausted.
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NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military issued a public apology for dumping formaldehyde into the Han River, a main source of drinking water for Seoul's 12 million people. It was the first public apology issued by the U.S. military in South Korea since its deployment here in the Korean War. Earlier this month, the military admitted releasing 20 gallons of formaldehyde into the Han River in February. The U.S.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tears streamed down Hwang Kae Il's face as the 56-year-old farmer recalled the day in 1950 when an American fighter plane attacked him and hundreds of fellow refugees, killing his father and many of his neighbors. These weren't tears of grief, however, shed decades after the Korean War. A bullet from the aircraft's machine guns passed through his father's neck before smashing Hwang's cheekbone and tearing out his left eye.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | From Reuters
A U.S. soldier based in South Korea was arrested Wednesday and charged with attempted rape after he allegedly broke into a woman's apartment, a U.S. military statement said. It said Army Pvt. Terrence Hines was in U.S. military custody after Korean police pursued him from the apartment in the Itaewon district of Seoul, which is near the country's biggest American military base. Police were called to the apartment early in the morning by a neighbor, the statement said. A total of 37,000 U.S.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | From Reuters
The United States and South Korea will begin huge joint military maneuvers today despite protests from North Korea, which charges that the scheduled 10-week exercise is a preparation for war. About 200,000 American and South Korean troops will take part in Team Spirit 87, the latest edition of annual exercises first staged on the peninsula in 1976. The exercise is billed as the largest in the non-communist world. Units from U.S.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tears streamed down Hwang Kae Il's face as the 56-year-old farmer recalled the day in 1950 when an American fighter plane attacked him and hundreds of fellow refugees, killing his father and many of his neighbors. These weren't tears of grief, however, shed decades after the Korean War. A bullet from the aircraft's machine guns passed through his father's neck before smashing Hwang's cheekbone and tearing out his left eye.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was a story no one wanted to hear: Early in the Korean War, villagers said, American soldiers machine-gunned hundreds of helpless civilians under a railroad bridge in the South Korean countryside. When the families spoke out, seeking redress, they met only rejection and denial, from the U.S. military and from their own government in Seoul. Now a dozen veterans have spoken too, and support their story with haunting memories from a "forgotten" war.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Sunday expressed a "debt of gratitude" to U.S. military personnel around the world for their role in deterring the development and use of weapons of mass destruction and stressed the need to remain "vigilant," particularly in the face of threats from Iraq and North Korea. Although he was speaking in South Korea, Clinton clearly had the ongoing tensions with Iraq on his mind. Just a little more than a week earlier, he gave the go-ahead for a massive airstrike against Iraq.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed regret Thursday over the deaths of Korean civilians shot by retreating U.S. troops near the hamlet of No Gun Ri in the chaotic early days of the Korean War, but he stopped far short of the apology that many South Koreans have demanded.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of students and villagers chanting anti-American slogans and shaking clenched fists marched in Seoul, demanding an end to the U.S. military presence in the country. The march was led by a student wearing a mask of President Clinton and dragging three others dressed as South Korean peasants allegedly killed by U.S. soldiers. "Yankee go home!" about 1,000 protesters chanted during a rally in a railroad plaza. Protesters also carried dozens of anti-U.S. banners. No clashes were reported.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military issued a public apology for dumping formaldehyde into the Han River, a main source of drinking water for Seoul's 12 million people. It was the first public apology issued by the U.S. military in South Korea since its deployment here in the Korean War. Earlier this month, the military admitted releasing 20 gallons of formaldehyde into the Han River in February. The U.S.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-standing public irritation at the behavior of the U.S. military in South Korea has found a new lightning rod: the legal system for American soldiers who commit crimes here. So angry is the mood here that one of South Korea's largest newspapers, the Joong Ang Ilbo, carried a front-page cartoon last week depicting a group of grinning GIs being escorted by U.S. military police officers back to the safety of their base, leaving behind a beaten Korean lying in the street.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korean War's battles ended almost five decades ago, but this village not far from Seoul has been under constant siege ever since--not by North Korea, but from U.S. bombs and machine-gun fire. Nearly every weekday morning, when the wind is calm, the sounds of war commence, often lasting well into the night. U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt antitank planes swoop down like vultures, unleashing their hail of bullets in a terrifying clamor at targets on the edge of rice paddies.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. investigators visited the scene of the alleged mass killing of civilians by U.S. soldiers during the Korean War. The eight investigators, led by the Army's inspector general, Lt. Gen. Michael Ackerman, interviewed survivors during their visit, the first field investigation of the alleged July 1950 massacre at No Gun Ri, a South Korean hamlet. The Pentagon says it must complete its investigation of the alleged massacre before deciding whether to grant legal immunity to any veterans.
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. helicopter crashed in North Korean territory this morning, and Pyongyang immediately said its troops had shot it down. Initial reports from Seoul indicated that the two crew members survived the crash. It was not immediately clear whether they were in North Korean hands. A U.S. military spokesman in Seoul said the U.S. Army OH-58 scout helicopter landed three miles north of the Demilitarized Zone near Wontong in the North's Kangwon province.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A bomb exploded at the entrance of a Paris newspaper office early Saturday, slightly injuring three people in what police said may have been a Persian Gulf-related terrorist attack. Other bombings possibly linked to the Gulf War were reported in Turkey and Lebanon. In Australia, authorities expelled the Iraqi charge d'affaires for "security reasons" and said they uncovered a plot to hijack a U.S.-bound airliner. Amid concerns about terrorism, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the fallout from recent reports that U.S. soldiers might have killed unarmed civilians during the Korean War, there has been a telling quiet among one community with a deeply personal stake in the news: Korean Americans. Little has been heard from that increasingly visible and vocal population, even as the allegations of American massacres have topped the print and broadcast news and prompted a government investigation.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon, in an abrupt about-face, declared Thursday that it would use "whatever resources are available" to investigate whether U.S. infantrymen massacred more than 100 South Koreans in 1950 during the chaotic opening weeks of the Korean War.
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