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United States Armed Forces Southeast Asia

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February 4, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early this week, Adm. Charles R. Larson, the commander-in-chief of American forces in the Pacific, sat back in his spacious headquarters office above Pearl Harbor and mused about the possibility of a renewed U.S. military relationship with Vietnam. "It's not inconceivable that our ships could once again visit Cam Ranh Bay," the commander told The Times, referring to the prized Vietnamese port that has been used during the last 15 years by the Soviet Union and Russia.
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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early this week, Adm. Charles R. Larson, the commander-in-chief of American forces in the Pacific, sat back in his spacious headquarters office above Pearl Harbor and mused about the possibility of a renewed U.S. military relationship with Vietnam. "It's not inconceivable that our ships could once again visit Cam Ranh Bay," the commander told The Times, referring to the prized Vietnamese port that has been used during the last 15 years by the Soviet Union and Russia.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration assured apprehensive Southeast Asian democracies Monday that the United States will maintain its current military presence in the region, despite its push to cut U.S. troop strength in Europe, and that it will move to enhance American military capability in South Korea. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told foreign ministers of countries belonging to the Assn.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration assured apprehensive Southeast Asian democracies Monday that the United States will maintain its current military presence in the region, despite its push to cut U.S. troop strength in Europe, and that it will move to enhance American military capability in South Korea. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told foreign ministers of countries belonging to the Assn.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush arrives in Singapore tonight, his visit--the first by a U.S. President--will represent a gesture of American gratitude to this tiny nation for opening its arms to U.S. warships and airplanes at a time when virtually no one else in the region wants them. The Philippines only recently told the United States to withdraw the last of its naval forces from Subic Bay Naval Base within a year, marking the end of nearly a century of U.S. military presence in the country.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Cambodian government on Saturday gave the United States what could be the remains of two Marines killed in the Indochina War, amid growing bilateral efforts to determine the fate of Americans missing in action. The two sets of remains, in small wooden caskets topped with folded American flags, were placed aboard an Air Force C-130 transport plane to be flown to Army laboratories in Hawaii.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Cambodian government on Saturday gave the United States what could be the remains of two Marines killed in the Indochina War, amid growing bilateral efforts to determine the fate of Americans missing in action. The two sets of remains, in small wooden caskets topped with folded American flags, were placed aboard an Air Force C-130 transport plane to be flown to Army laboratories in Hawaii.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush arrives in Singapore tonight, his visit--the first by a U.S. President--will represent a gesture of American gratitude to this tiny nation for opening its arms to U.S. warships and airplanes at a time when virtually no one else in the region wants them. The Philippines only recently told the United States to withdraw the last of its naval forces from Subic Bay Naval Base within a year, marking the end of nearly a century of U.S. military presence in the country.
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