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United States Armed Forces Wages And Salaries

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BUSINESS
March 3, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a world apart, Jeremy Kneip and Al Preciado are paid to stare down death. Kneip, 20, has faced the fear of chemical weapons and Scud attacks as an El Toro Marine lance corporal stationed in the Persian Gulf. Preciado, 26, encounters thieves and junkies eight hours a day as a Santa Ana police officer. Each job requires a high school diploma and some physical fitness, and each man has 2 1/2 years' experience. But the similarities between them stop when it comes to compensation.
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NEWS
February 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Moving to fulfill a campaign promise, President Bush will tell the armed forces this week that he will seek $1.4 billion to improve pay and living standards--and an additional $1 billion as an incentive to retain highly skilled service members. Bush, who plans three one-day trips to military installations this week, said in his weekly radio address Saturday that the visits "signal the priority that I place on our military." His emphasis clearly is on the troops.
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NEWS
October 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday approved a $278-billion defense appropriations bill that will keep alive the imperiled F-22 fighter plane program and provide military personnel with their biggest pay raise in 18 years. By a 372-55 vote, the chamber passed a compromise measure that gives the military $4.5 billion more than President Clinton recommended and $17 billion more than was spent on defense in fiscal 1999. The bill is expected to win Senate approval.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to defuse an embarrassing campaign issue, the Pentagon Friday proposed a $31-million-a-year plan to reduce the number of U.S. troops eligible for federal food stamps. Defense officials asked Congress to approve a "subsistence plan" that would give lower-paid enlisted troops electronic debit cards so they could obtain groceries while avoiding the stigma of taking part in a program for the poor.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
The House approved a bill Wednesday that would increase spending for the military--and raise military pay--and revamp the nation's nuclear weapon programs. The legislation, which passed, 375 to 45, would increase military spending by $18 billion over this year's outlays and calls for a reorganization of the Energy Department to create a largely independent nuclear weapon agency within the department.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Moving to fulfill a campaign promise, President Bush will tell the armed forces this week that he will seek $1.4 billion to improve pay and living standards--and an additional $1 billion as an incentive to retain highly skilled service members. Bush, who plans three one-day trips to military installations this week, said in his weekly radio address Saturday that the visits "signal the priority that I place on our military." His emphasis clearly is on the troops.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
Monthly pay rates for various ranks in most branches of the military. Service personnel in gulf receive an extra $110 in combat pay: Sgt 1st Class: $1,323--$2,338 Staff Sergeant: $1,139--$1,707 Sergeant: $999--$1,448 Corporal: $932--$1,167 Private 1st Class: $878--$1,001 Private: $697--$845
NEWS
August 11, 1988
House and Senate conferees agreed to give the nation's 4.4 million civilian and military workers a 4.1% pay raise next year. President Reagan is expected to sign the measure, which would take effect Jan. 1. The raise would increase the salary of the highest-ranking career civil servant from $77,500 to $80,775 a year. The cost of the raise is more than $4 billion. The civilian agencies are required to absorb its full cost, but details of the military raise have not been determined.
NEWS
June 15, 1988
About 250 soldiers given heroes' welcomes when they returned to Fort Ord from Honduras in April were handed a nasty shock when they opened their monthly paychecks--they were about $150 short because the Army deducted their ration allowance while they were in Central America on training exercises. "Many who were relying on separate rations may have experienced a shortfall," an Army spokesman said.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | Associated Press
The Air Force wants to establish a $54-million bonus program in the next fiscal year in hopes of persuading more of its pilots to stay in the service, Air Force Secretary Edward C. Aldridge said Friday. Because of stepped-up hiring by commercial airlines, the re-enlistment rate for military pilots is dropping steadily, Aldridge said at a news conference. Within the key group of pilots who have six to 11 years in the service, retention has dropped from about 78% in 1983 to 48% in 1987, he said.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Reuters
The Senate easily approved a $310-billion defense spending plan Thursday that boosts military pay and broadens pharmacy access for retirees after rejecting more stringent testing for a proposed national missile defense system. On a 97-3 vote, senators authorized a 3.7% military pay raise, equal to the president's request, and allowed for the purchase of a wide range of new high-tech weaponry for the armed forces.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday approved a $278-billion defense appropriations bill that will keep alive the imperiled F-22 fighter plane program and provide military personnel with their biggest pay raise in 18 years. By a 372-55 vote, the chamber passed a compromise measure that gives the military $4.5 billion more than President Clinton recommended and $17 billion more than was spent on defense in fiscal 1999. The bill is expected to win Senate approval.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
The House approved a bill Wednesday that would increase spending for the military--and raise military pay--and revamp the nation's nuclear weapon programs. The legislation, which passed, 375 to 45, would increase military spending by $18 billion over this year's outlays and calls for a reorganization of the Energy Department to create a largely independent nuclear weapon agency within the department.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted Thursday to increase a military pay raise and to require that the president consult with Congress before involving U.S. military forces in Kosovo. Senators rejected a move to force a reduction in troops in Bosnia and added a $1.9-billion emergency fund to support troops in Bosnia as part of a $252-billion defense appropriation. Military pay would go up 3.6% next year, rather than the 3.1% approved last month by the House, under an amendment to the defense bill.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the brief telephone calls from Saudi Arabia, Christy Roemmich says, her husband never fails to bring up the subject. "He always asks me how the money is holding up," said the Elk Grove, Calif., woman of conversations with her husband, Michael, a 31-year-old staff sergeant with the California National Guard. Roemmich responds to the query with a standard "We are fine" and keeps to herself the many financial problems that have arisen since her husband was called to active duty in September.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf's salary is based on his military pay grade of O-10--the highest--plus the number of years he has been in the service (34 years). He receives an ANNUAL BASE PAY OF $101,299 that is supplemented by a monthly allowance for food of $129. While he is in the Gulf, he also receives monthly combat pay of $110. Since Schwarzkopf lives on base, he does not receive a housing allowance.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate, acting earlier than ever on a congressional spending blueprint, overwhelmingly adopted a bipartisan $1.1-trillion budget Thursday that adds $2.6 billion to President Reagan's program for fighting drug addiction. Sponsors of the resolution, which passed 69 to 26, said that it is designed to reduce the federal deficit from the current $150 billion to $136 billion in line with an agreement last November between Congress and the White House.
NEWS
February 5, 1989
The general in charge of the U.S. Central Command has recommended the suspension of combat pay for sailors in the Persian Gulf, Pentagon sources say. The request by Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, under review by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is the strongest indication yet that U.S. defense officials believe the truce in the Iran-Iraq War will hold. The bonuses are worth $110 a month and have been paid to military personnel working in the Persian Gulf since August, 1987.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a world apart, Jeremy Kneip and Al Preciado are paid to stare down death. Kneip, 20, has faced the fear of chemical weapons and Scud attacks as an El Toro Marine lance corporal stationed in the Persian Gulf. Preciado, 26, encounters thieves and junkies eight hours a day as a Santa Ana police officer. Each job requires a high school diploma and some physical fitness, and each man has 2 1/2 years' experience. But the similarities between them stop when it comes to compensation.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In normal times, taxes are unaffected by the type of job you hold. But today, if you are in the military and are serving in the Persian Gulf, you get special treatment that will probably result in a higher tax refund. Military personnel on duty in the combat zone may be able to exclude a significant portion of their income from taxes. They won't be charged interest or penalties if they owe money and fail to file before April 15.
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