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NEWS
August 26, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS and WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writers
U.S., West German and Swedish authorities have broken a major spy ring centered on a retired U.S. Army sergeant who allegedly sold secret plans for the defense of Europe to Soviet Bloc agents, officials said Thursday. The retired sergeant first class, Clyde Lee Conrad of Sebring, Ohio, was a custodian of top-secret documents at a U.S. Army archive in West Germany and allegedly sold U.S. and North Atlantic Treaty Organization plans for repelling a Soviet ground attack on Western Europe.
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NEWS
July 24, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the crews that staff NATO's 18 American-made early-warning radar planes here, life on the flight line is unusually complicated. At other NATO air installations, the pilots and other personnel have had to worry only about air operations. But at this base, where there are people from a dozen different countries, there are other concerns.
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NEWS
February 3, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three weeks ago, concerned that the peaceful revolution in Eastern Europe had rendered his troop reduction plans obsolete, President Bush ordered his top advisers to review the situation and come up with a new plan. Now, less than 48 hours after the new plan was unveiled, events once again seem to have leapfrogged past the American position. West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher flew to Washington on Friday for a meeting with Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl sought Sunday to reassure Europe and Western allies that a reunified Germany will not be a threat to peace, but he made clear that the pace of reunification will be decided by the Germans themselves, not by outsiders. "This is not 1945; this is 1990," Kohl said at one point during a joint press conference with President Bush after two days of meetings between the two men at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland north of Washington.
NEWS
April 28, 1988
A U.S. military train was damaged by explosions on a journey between Frankfurt, West Germany, and West Berlin, but no injuries were reported. "We're treating this as an attack," a West German police spokesman said, but he conceded there was no information on who was responsible. Thirty-one people were on board when the blast occurred, about 120 miles northeast of Frankfurt, damaging the locomotive and a section of track. A railroad spokesman said the U.S.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Saturday reaffirmed Washington's military commitment to West Berlin, saying cuts are unlikely while large Soviet and East German contingents surround the divided city. Cheney is on a three-week European tour to talk with allied government leaders and visit U.S. troops. He arrived in West Berlin late Friday after two days of talks with West German leaders in Bonn, and later flew to Rome.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci warned Western Europeans here Sunday that America might be forced to withdraw its troops from West Germany if that country decided to ban nuclear weapons from its territory. His warning was implicitly supported by several of the U.S. senators who have also been attending the 25th annual Wehrkunde (Defense Studies) Conference, a private group that brings together nearly 200 defense and strategic arms experts from both sides of the Atlantic.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, on his first official visit to West Germany, aimed a stinging barb at the new East German leader, Egon Krenz, calling the Berlin Wall the "biggest symbol of the inadequacy" of his government.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three weeks ago, concerned that the peaceful revolution in Eastern Europe had rendered his troop reduction plans obsolete, President Bush ordered his top advisers to review the situation and come up with a new plan. Now, less than 48 hours after the new plan was unveiled, events once again seem to have leapfrogged past the American position. West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher flew to Washington on Friday for a meeting with Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Berlin Wall becomes a symbol rather than a barrier, West Berliners are showing resentment at the status of the Allied powers of World War II as the ultimate authority in West Berlin. Political elements are bringing pressure to bear for a change in that status. "Resentment is growing," Eckart D. Stratenschulte, a West Berlin city official, said in his office near City Hall. It was near here, in 1963, that President John F. Kennedy proclaimed, "Ich bin ein Berliner!
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | Times Staff Writer
American forces patrolling the East-West German border in the Fulda Gap have been ordered to leave their trademark M-16 rifles in the barracks and instead carry .45-caliber pistols on their border rounds, according to the Pentagon. The 5th Corps commander "didn't want to give East Germans crossing the border the impression that they were entering an armed camp" and issued the order late last week, said a spokesman, Lt. Col. Richard Bridges.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Saturday reaffirmed Washington's military commitment to West Berlin, saying cuts are unlikely while large Soviet and East German contingents surround the divided city. Cheney is on a three-week European tour to talk with allied government leaders and visit U.S. troops. He arrived in West Berlin late Friday after two days of talks with West German leaders in Bonn, and later flew to Rome.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, on his first official visit to West Germany, aimed a stinging barb at the new East German leader, Egon Krenz, calling the Berlin Wall the "biggest symbol of the inadequacy" of his government.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities in West Berlin said Sunday that they have detained an American Air Force man, seized while talking to two Soviet military officers who were allegedly trying to obtain information from him. American officials said the Soviet officers were briefly detained and questioned by counterintelligence officers before being handed over to Soviet officials in East Berlin. The U.S.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A former U.S. Army sergeant, arrested last year, has been charged with treason for allegedly running an international spy ring that sold NATO secrets to East Bloc agents, the federal prosecutor's office announced Friday. The case of former U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Clyde Lee Conrad marks the first time that a foreign citizen living in West Germany has been charged with treason, according to Hans-Juergen Foerster, a spokesman for the federal prosecutor's office.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | From United Press International
American, British and French soldiers stationed in West Berlin regularly go on buying sprees in East Berlin to purchase state-subsidized products with money obtained illegally on the black market, the Soviet newspaper Izvestia said Saturday. The soldiers sell dollars and West German marks to speculators in West Berlin, who in return give them East German marks at an illegal rate as much as 20 times more favorable than the official exchange level, the official government daily said.
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