Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Armed Forces Women
IN THE NEWS

United States Armed Forces Women

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy Lt. Kara Hultgreen, who had dreamed as a teen-ager of being an astronaut and then became the first woman qualified as an F-14 combat pilot, was killed when her plane crashed during a training mission, the Navy announced Wednesday. Hultgreen, 29, was attempting to land on the carrier Abraham Lincoln off Southern California when her F-14 Tomcat crashed into the ocean Tuesday afternoon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the Navy, it is a way to make warships sweeter smelling and more comfortable for today's increasingly diverse crews. To the critics, it is social engineering and lamentable proof that Navy traditions are going the way of wooden ships. The Navy has issued orders to replace urinals on the surface fleet with a "gender-neutral" commode called the "Stainless Sanitary Space System."
Advertisement
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the Navy, it is a way to make warships sweeter smelling and more comfortable for today's increasingly diverse crews. To the critics, it is social engineering and lamentable proof that Navy traditions are going the way of wooden ships. The Navy has issued orders to replace urinals on the surface fleet with a "gender-neutral" commode called the "Stainless Sanitary Space System."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marthe Cohn's children, who have flown in from around the country to witness her moment of glory today, say she never told them what she did to earn one of France's highest military honors. To them, Cohn, an 80-year-old Rancho Palos Verdes resident, is a strict but loving mother, fanatical about keeping the kitchen clean and over the moon about her granddaughter.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news of imminent victory in the Persian Gulf was not uppermost Wednesday in the minds of residents of this small town and others like it in the western foothills of the Alleghenies. Rather, their thoughts were of Christine Mayes of nearby Rochester Mills and Beverly Clark of Armagh--two of the first three American women to die in the Gulf War. Adrienne L. Mitchell, 20, an Army private from Moreno Valley in California, also died in the attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Navy has opened the skies to female pilots flying combat missions, it still draws a line on the ground barring women Seabees from combat duty. The Seabees' Naval Mobile Construction Battalions at Port Hueneme--which build barracks, clear airfields and defuse mines for the Marine Corps on ground combat missions--continue to be closed to women. Although the units are not assault forces, their mission is to directly support the Marines and to defend themselves if necessary.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon announced a new policy Thursday that would allow women to serve in some combat support jobs but skeptics immediately questioned how fully the Army and Marine Corps--both of which are reluctant to make sweeping changes--would carry it out. Under the new plan, which will take effect Oct. 1, women still would be barred from direct ground combat assignments. But they no longer would be excluded from assignments because they are dangerous.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy and Marine Corps unveiled a policy Tuesday designed to ensure that women who become pregnant on active duty do not suffer career setbacks for taking time out from sea duty or hazardous assignments. Navy Secretary John H. Dalton ordered that women who become pregnant while at sea be assigned to similar first-line billets after their maternity leave, and he forbade commanders from using pregnancy as a basis for lowering marks on performance reports.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of the Navy's admirals and one of its highest-ranking civilians will be censured--and the admirals could lose their jobs--for failing to aggressively investigate the alleged sexual assaults of 26 women, some of them officers, by naval aviators at the 1991 Tailhook convention in Las Vegas, sources said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy conducted a poorly coordinated, halfhearted investigation into sexual assault allegations stemming from the 1991 Tailhook convention, and did so under the direction of an admiral who apparently doubted that women belonged in the military, Pentagon investigators said Thursday in their first major report on the scandal.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the attack submarine Oklahoma City, sailors share bathrooms with 32 other men, sleep atop torpedoes and attend Sunday services in a space that also functions as the officers' dining room, reading room and surgical theater. Spending months at a time inside a 360-foot vessel with 145 men, a nuclear reactor and dozens of torpedoes and cruise missiles is like living inside a Swiss watch, crew members say. And in the view of some submariners and their superiors, it's no place for a woman.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House voted to require the Army, Navy and Air Force to train male and female recruits separately. Only the Marine Corps trains male and female recruits separately. Men and women wouldn't share barracks or boot camp training any longer under the bill. A final vote on the $270-billion defense bill was expected today. A bipartisan panel studied the matter last year after a sex scandal at an Army base in Maryland and urged the change.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Army, Navy and Air Force all oppose a recommendation by an influential panel to separate men and women during basic training, Pentagon officials said Tuesday. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen will make the final decision on the issue, but the views of the three services could be sent to him by the end of this week, said several senior Pentagon officials. "We want to train as we fight. We are not going to gender segregate," said one senior official.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER and STEVEN GRAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In aging uniforms and gleaming medals, some leaning on canes, others walking with sure steps, thousands of female veterans converged on Washington on Saturday to dedicate a memorial intended to give recognition to American women's military service and sacrifice. Women whose military careers were spent in the shadow of men came together for the opening of the $21.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy neither discriminated against nor gave preferential treatment to the first group of women aviators to fly combat planes, according to a report released Tuesday by the Navy's inspector general. But the report also concluded that some male senior officers were guilty of maladroit leadership that irritated the women and angered their male colleagues by appearing to either show favoritism or a paternalistic condescension.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Reuters
Former 1st Lt. Kelly Flinn, who was discharged from the Air Force for having an adulterous affair, said Sunday that the treatment she received was indicative of a double standard in such cases, based on sex and rank. In a guest essay appearing in the issue of Newsweek that goes on sale today, Flinn compared her case to that of Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. warplanes Friday pummeled Iraqi troops and armored vehicles moving along the Kuwaiti border with Saudi Arabia, but the aim of the Iraqi movement remained unclear. U.S. and Saudi officials said allied forces seized at least 400 Iraqi prisoners of war in two days of clashes in and near the Saudi town of Khafji that ended Thursday night. Also Friday, officials confirmed that an AC-130 Spectre gunship had been shot down in southern Iraq early Thursday.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army said Friday that press accounts of a female commander's battle exploits in Panama, later repeated by White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater, were grossly exaggerated. According to widely published accounts from Panama, Army Capt. Linda Bray, 29, led a force of 30 military police in a fierce three-hour fire-fight at a Panama Defense Forces guard dog kennel that left three Panamanian soldiers dead.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If the Army wants to find evidence of sexual harassment, it need look no further than the Pizza Hut on Route 36, just a stoplight or two down the road from this picturesque collection of brick buildings and aging white clapboard barracks nestled along Virginia's Appomattox River. Here, over the $4.49 pizza-and-salad buffet special, it was possible this week to strike up a noontime conversation with three veteran female sergeants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|