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December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
At least three Yemenis suspected of belonging to an international terrorist network will go on trial next month for the deadly attack on the U.S. destroyer Cole, Yemen's prime minister said Wednesday. Prime Minister Abdul-Karim Iryani said as many as six people--all Yemenis--could be tried on charges of laying the groundwork for the attack, which killed 17 U.S. sailors on the warship as it refueled in Yemen's seaport of Aden on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula.
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NEWS
December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
At least three Yemenis suspected of belonging to an international terrorist network will go on trial next month for the deadly attack on the U.S. destroyer Cole, Yemen's prime minister said Wednesday. Prime Minister Abdul-Karim Iryani said as many as six people--all Yemenis--could be tried on charges of laying the groundwork for the attack, which killed 17 U.S. sailors on the warship as it refueled in Yemen's seaport of Aden on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula.
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NEWS
November 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
The men who bombed the U.S. Navy destroyer Cole got help from Yemeni officials who fought with them in Afghanistan in the 1980s, sources close to the case said Monday as the crippled ship began a five-week trip home. The Cole was getting a piggyback ride back to the United States aboard a Norwegian ship carrying the 8,600-ton destroyer on its deck. The ships sailed from waters off Yemen on Sunday. The Cole should reach its home port of Norfolk, Va., by about Dec.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
The men who bombed the U.S. Navy destroyer Cole got help from Yemeni officials who fought with them in Afghanistan in the 1980s, sources close to the case said Monday as the crippled ship began a five-week trip home. The Cole was getting a piggyback ride back to the United States aboard a Norwegian ship carrying the 8,600-ton destroyer on its deck. The ships sailed from waters off Yemen on Sunday. The Cole should reach its home port of Norfolk, Va., by about Dec.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting "God Bless America" and Kid Rock rap through the shipboard PA system, the crippled $1-billion guided missile destroyer Cole inched out of this port city with the aid of four small Yemeni tugs Sunday, ending the first chapter in one of the most humbling attacks in modern U.S. naval history. Members of the Yemeni navy lined up at attention on the dock beside their rusting Soviet-era frigates, some saluting the U.S.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days before terrorists lowered their 20-foot, cream-colored boat into the water near Little Aden's Khaldin Bridge last month and headed for the U.S. warship Cole, copies of a fax arrived in at least two Yemeni civilian offices at the harbor. One copy of the fax, which announced key operational details of the guided missile destroyer's visit, was sent to the port's harbor master. Another went to Gulf of Aden Shipping Co., the Yemeni commercial contractor used by the U.S.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days before terrorists lowered their 20-foot, cream-colored boat into the water near Little Aden's Khaldin Bridge last month and headed for the U.S. warship Cole, copies of a fax arrived in at least two Yemeni civilian offices at the harbor. One copy of the fax, which announced key operational details of the guided missile destroyer's visit, was sent to the port's harbor master. Another went to Gulf of Aden Shipping Co., the Yemeni commercial contractor used by the U.S.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting "God Bless America" and Kid Rock rap through the shipboard PA system, the crippled $1-billion guided missile destroyer Cole inched out of this port city with the aid of four small Yemeni tugs Sunday, ending the first chapter in one of the most humbling attacks in modern U.S. naval history. Members of the Yemeni navy lined up at attention on the dock beside their rusting Soviet-era frigates, some saluting the U.S.
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