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NEWS
October 7, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few ships pack as much punch per pound as this 567-foot U.S. guided-missile cruiser. Plying the Ionian Sea hundreds of miles south of the Serbian province of Kosovo, it bristles with missiles, torpedoes, helicopters, cannons and guns. "It's a Death Star," Capt. Joe Klingseis boasted Tuesday as he leaned into a 35-knot wind gust on the starboard catwalk--his favorite spot on the Aegis cruiser under his command--and admired the Anzio from bow to stern through gold-rimmed aviator glasses.
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NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
A U.S. soldier burst into tears when a military panel cleared him Tuesday of the accidental shooting death of a 6-year-old boy in Kosovo, closing a trial that threatened to strain relations between U.S. troops and ethnic Albanians. Pfc. Nicholas Young of Sacramento, who was 19 at the time of the July 10 shooting, was cleared of charges of negligent homicide and dereliction of duty. He had been serving as a peacekeeper in Kosovo.
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NEWS
May 5, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and NORMAN KEMPSTER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. Army Apache helicopter crashed early today in Albania while on a nighttime training flight, killing both crew members, who became the first Americans and NATO soldiers to die in the alliance's air campaign against Yugoslavia, the U.S. Army said. The AH-64, a copter specializing in attacks on tanks and other ground targets, went down at 1:30 a.m. local time about 50 miles north of Tirana's Rinas airport, the U.S. Army's European Command in Stuttgart, Germany, said.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An American sailor serving with international peacekeepers in Kosovo has died of injuries sustained when he fell from a helicopter, the U.S. military said. He was identified as Navy Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Chad Burkhart, 25, of New Holland, Pa. The accident is under investigation, the statement said.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
A U.S. soldier burst into tears when a military panel cleared him Tuesday of the accidental shooting death of a 6-year-old boy in Kosovo, closing a trial that threatened to strain relations between U.S. troops and ethnic Albanians. Pfc. Nicholas Young of Sacramento, who was 19 at the time of the July 10 shooting, was cleared of charges of negligent homicide and dereliction of duty. He had been serving as a peacekeeper in Kosovo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1999
Barry Pascal, owner of Northridge Pharmacy, said his heart dropped when he heard American soldiers had been captured near the Macedonian border this week. "I figured there was something we could do to show the community we haven't forgotten those poor boys," Pascal said. "I want them to know we care."
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Clearing skies over Belgrade allowed NATO to strike Yugoslavia's 1st Army headquarters, an ammunition plant and other targets Sunday, as the Pentagon announced plans to deploy Apache attack helicopters and ground-based missiles for the first time in the Kosovo theater. Allied aircraft delivered strikes around the capital of Yugoslavia on Easter morning, and after nightfall to Pristina, the capital of Kosovo.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration said Tuesday that U.S. ground forces may soon be called on to help keep the peace in Kosovo, and it warned Yugoslav leaders that they must take further steps to halt their aggression against ethnic Albanians in the separatist province or face imminent NATO airstrikes. As diplomatic efforts intensified, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said U.S.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. Army sergeant testified that he shot at an ethnic Albanian last year who had been shooting at U.S. troops in Kosovo, according to those who heard his testimony. That evidence may clear a Serbian family accused in the death. Testimony in the trial of a father and two sons ended with Sgt. Robert Black describing the July 1999 gun battle.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whipped by the gathering winds of nationalism, the Yugoslav conflagration that destroyed Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1992 now threatens to engulf southeastern Europe and draw American forces into the Balkans war. As acts of premeditated savagery against Bosnia's Muslim Slavs have steadily mounted to provide testimony to genocide, military intervention has become the rallying cry of frustrated Western nations whose earlier preference for diplomacy abjectly failed to contain the crisis.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the groan of armored vehicles and the roar of combat helicopters descending from the night sky. Before Xhejlane Shabiu was fully awake, dozens of battle-ready troops had burst into her house, swearing and gesturing with their weapons for her startled family to line up against the wall. "They just kept screaming at us, and the children began crying," the 36-year-old Kosovo Albanian recalls of the incident in May, when she was four months pregnant.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are taught to be prepared for an attack at any moment, to return fire when threatened, to win with overwhelming force. This conditioning produces elite U.S. combat troops. But some experts have disputed whether it is the best preparation for the peacekeeping missions that combat troops often take on in the world today. And an official Army report now gives added support to their view.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. Army sergeant testified that he shot at an ethnic Albanian last year who had been shooting at U.S. troops in Kosovo, according to those who heard his testimony. That evidence may clear a Serbian family accused in the death. Testimony in the trial of a father and two sons ended with Sgt. Robert Black describing the July 1999 gun battle.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after the first of more than 5,000 U.S. troops marched into Kosovo to help impose a fragile peace, Clinton administration officials are acknowledging an unsettling truth: They won't be coming home any time soon. Unlike the "one-year-only" bravado that accompanied U.S. forces into Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1995, there is not even an estimate from these officials of the duration of international military operations in Kosovo. But their message is clear.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
On the night of June 2, 1999, President Clinton's national security advisor, Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, sat glumly in his corner office in the White House's West Wing. His task: drafting a memo advising Clinton to prepare for a ground invasion of Yugoslavia. NATO's air war against Serbia had been underway for 71 days, but Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic hadn't buckled. Almost a million refugees from Kosovo had fled into exile, and thousands more were homeless inside the province.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
American peacekeeping troops launched a surprise raid Friday near the town of Kacanik in southeastern Kosovo, seizing a variety of illegally held land mines, U.S. military officials said. Details of the operation were sketchy, but a brief statement from Camp Bondsteel, headquarters for the U.S. peacekeeping force in Kosovo--a province of Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic--said the raid was launched in the early morning hours by air assault troops of the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aboard the cruiser Philippine Sea, Capt. Ronald Jenkins issued the order to fire at 6:50 p.m., just as dusk was settling over the Adriatic Sea. In a small, dimly lighted cubicle called the Combat Information Center, a petty officer clicked a computer mouse, sending the first Tomahawk cruise missiles blasting from their deck tube hatches with a loud pop.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton can count on Congress giving him the $6 billion he wants for the war in Kosovo, but he's going to have to pay a price. He'll probably have to give up control of billions of dollars in revenue from state tobacco settlements. He'll have to swallow funding for a new military parking lot and other construction projects. He faces pressure to give ground on environmental policy.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | Associated Press
A U.S. soldier charged with raping and murdering an 11-year-old ethnic Albanian girl will face a second hearing next week in Germany, the U.S. military said Thursday. The hearing, similar to a grand jury under U.S. criminal law, will determine whether there is enough evidence to court-martial Staff Sgt. Frank J. Ronghi, who could face the death penalty if convicted. It will take place Wednesday at an Army base in Vilseck, Germany, according to a statement from the U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
The House refused Wednesday to slash a planned $1.7 billion for battling drug lords in Colombia and edged toward approving a $13-billion bill that would also finance U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo and aid victims of natural disasters at home. The House voted, 239-186, to reject an effort by Rep. David R. Obey (D-Wis.) that would have delayed, and perhaps eventually killed, $522 million of the Colombia aid. The roll call came after House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.
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