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NEWS
March 14, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The navigator on the submarine Greeneville testified Tuesday that the captain appeared too impatient to follow normal safety procedures in the moments before the sub collided with a Japanese fishing vessel during a rapid surfacing maneuver done to impress 16 civilian VIPs. "He was definitely going quickly; he wasn't wasting time," Lt. Keith Sloan told a court of inquiry reviewing the Feb. 9 collision that killed nine aboard the trawler Ehime Maru. Even while praising Cmdr. Scott D.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Three corporate executives are under consideration to lead the Air Force, Army and Navy, administration officials said Saturday. The three have been interviewed by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, and the White House was expected to announce this week that it will send their names to the Senate for confirmation, the Washington Times reported, quoting unidentified sources. Gordon R. England, 63, who retired recently from General Dynamics Corp., would be nominated as Navy secretary; James G.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | Associated Press
After three years and $143 million, the National Guard has no anti-terrorism teams ready to respond to nuclear, chemical or biological attacks because of defective safety equipment and poor training, an internal Pentagon review found. The Pentagon inspector general report said preparedness is so bad that Guard members at one point were given mobile labs with air filters installed backward and gas masks with incompatible parts.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third day in a row, President Bush on Wednesday went to a military installation to praise the armed forces and extol his plans to improve their lot. His audience on the final day of his tour of military bases was 1,200 reservists and National Guard members. And the message was that their service will become more important and their missions will be chosen more carefully.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Coast Guard said Wednesday that it plans to end its search tonight for nine people missing after a U.S. nuclear submarine collided with a Japanese trawler, as Navy officials investigated whether 16 civilians aboard the sub may have distracted its crew before the crash. While most of the survivors from the Ehime Maru flew home Wednesday, Navy officials also acknowledged that their probe could lead to criminal charges against one or more crew members of the attack sub Greeneville.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two civilians were at the controls of the nuclear-powered U.S. submarine Greeneville when it collided with a Japanese fishing vessel, leaving nine people lost at sea, a Navy official said Tuesday. The news prompted outrage from survivors of the accident, who spoke publicly for the first time. Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARIA L. LaGANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN and TONY PERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As tearful relatives of those missing at sea visited the site of the collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler, the Navy dispatched two high-tech undersea vehicles Monday to scour the ocean floor for wreckage--and possibly to recover bodies. Nine crew members, students and teachers who were aboard the trawler when it sank nine miles off Diamond Head on Friday still are unaccounted for.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only way to reform the Pentagon, one of President Bush's top advisors has been fond of declaring, is to "fire a few generals." It has yet to come to that. But the Bush administration has sent tremors through the huge defense bureaucracy by serving notice it plans to impose the most extensive remaking of the nation's military in years. Fancy new fighter planes, helicopters, destroyers--technology the military has long planned on buying--are now on the table.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | SUNNY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the oldest component of America's armed forces--the nation's first citizen-militia--known for their rapid-response role in battling floods, hurricanes, earthquakes and other domestic disasters. But over the last decade, the National Guard has increased another of its responsibilities: fighting alongside other U.S. troops overseas and participating in extended foreign peacekeeping deployments.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
With the completion of a probe into the killing of refugees by U.S. troops near the hamlet of No Gun Ri, South Koreans are pressing for an investigation into other alleged attacks on civilians by American forces in the early days of the Korean War. Sixty-one complaints have been filed with the Korean Defense Ministry in the past 15 months by people who say they survived or witnessed attacks by U.S. forces.
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