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NEWS
February 14, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two civilians were at the controls of the nuclear-powered U.S. submarine Greeneville when it collided with a Japanese fishing vessel, leaving nine people lost at sea, a Navy official said Tuesday. The news prompted outrage from survivors of the accident, who spoke publicly for the first time. Lt. Cmdr.
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NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARIA L. LaGANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN and TONY PERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As tearful relatives of those missing at sea visited the site of the collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler, the Navy dispatched two high-tech undersea vehicles Monday to scour the ocean floor for wreckage--and possibly to recover bodies. Nine crew members, students and teachers who were aboard the trawler when it sank nine miles off Diamond Head on Friday still are unaccounted for.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only way to reform the Pentagon, one of President Bush's top advisors has been fond of declaring, is to "fire a few generals." It has yet to come to that. But the Bush administration has sent tremors through the huge defense bureaucracy by serving notice it plans to impose the most extensive remaking of the nation's military in years. Fancy new fighter planes, helicopters, destroyers--technology the military has long planned on buying--are now on the table.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | SUNNY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the oldest component of America's armed forces--the nation's first citizen-militia--known for their rapid-response role in battling floods, hurricanes, earthquakes and other domestic disasters. But over the last decade, the National Guard has increased another of its responsibilities: fighting alongside other U.S. troops overseas and participating in extended foreign peacekeeping deployments.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
With the completion of a probe into the killing of refugees by U.S. troops near the hamlet of No Gun Ri, South Koreans are pressing for an investigation into other alleged attacks on civilians by American forces in the early days of the Korean War. Sixty-one complaints have been filed with the Korean Defense Ministry in the past 15 months by people who say they survived or witnessed attacks by U.S. forces.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Depleted uranium may or may not be a danger to life and health, but for the U.S.-led NATO alliance, fallout from mounting controversy over the American munitions that contain it is proving extremely noxious. "The hysteria and panic on this has become unbelievable," a NATO official said this week, shaking his head in dismay. For the incoming Bush administration, the dispute has arguably become the most urgent issue it will have to tackle with its European allies.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2000 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush is unlikely to seek major new initiatives in defense spending, but instead focus on targeted increases to replace aging fighter planes, warships and weaponry, analysts said. Although Bush talks tough on defense, his failure to obtain a decisive victory in the election and the evenly divided political power in Congress are likely to restrain any big ambition to strengthen U.S. military posture.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two ex-GIs who handled radio and message traffic told Pentagon investigators that American troops had orders from higher headquarters to fire on civilian refugees at No Gun Ri in the early days of the Korean War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Cold War had turned hot and the U.S. had gone to war with the Soviet Union, Ramon Rodriguez knew his marching orders. Rodriguez would have parachuted into Russia with a 12-man Special Forces team to train a guerrilla army. Quite a mission for a one-time teenage criminal who enlisted in the Army only to avoid going to prison. "The drop area is still classified.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. military chiefs warned Congress that America's defense spending must be quickly increased to replace aging Cold War weapons and bolster a slumping ability to fight and win two major wars at once. "We must find the resources necessary to modernize the force" of the world's only remaining superpower, Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
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