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NEWS
June 13, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-level advisory panel is urging the Pentagon to begin a sweeping transformation of the military by creating joint-service strike forces that could gain a foothold in international trouble spots in a single day. A report written for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and released Tuesday called for these "global joint response forces" to deploy air armadas, missiles, naval forces and other troops to gain control of war zones within four days.
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NEWS
June 7, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presidents have marked the day standing atop the cliffs of Normandy. They have visited the cemeteries in northern France where the soldiers lie buried, and they have walked the once-bloody beaches. On Wednesday, 57 years after D-day, President Bush turned to the little town on the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains that bore the greatest American burden.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's plan to overhaul the military is shaping up as a gradual and protracted effort, rather than the kind of explosive change that many had come to expect, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told lawmakers Wednesday during closed-door briefings. Rumsfeld is still aiming to bring major reform, as President Bush promised during his presidential campaign.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the key panels reviewing military strategy for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld are shying away from the kind of radical reform of the Pentagon that observers had anticipated. The study groups, which were organized at the beginning of the year and have been reporting back in recent weeks, were widely expected to urge elimination of some major weapon programs to pay for a sweeping transformation of the military.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century, the essential gear for the front-line infantry soldier has been a rifle, boots, canteen and helmet. Soon, it may also include a hand-held computer linked to satellites. U.S. military officials believe the system, developed by engineers at TRW Inc.'s research laboratory in Carson, could alter the way wars are fought by giving soldiers unprecedented access to battlefield information.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld signaled his intention to pursue dramatic changes in the way the nation's armed forces are organized, laying out for the first time his plans to overhaul the Pentagon in a private meeting with President Bush, several senior government officials said Thursday. Rumsfeld stopped short of making recommendations about weapon programs during his 90-minute meeting at the White House on Wednesday.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The navigator on the submarine Greeneville testified Tuesday that the captain appeared too impatient to follow normal safety procedures in the moments before the sub collided with a Japanese fishing vessel during a rapid surfacing maneuver done to impress 16 civilian VIPs. "He was definitely going quickly; he wasn't wasting time," Lt. Keith Sloan told a court of inquiry reviewing the Feb. 9 collision that killed nine aboard the trawler Ehime Maru. Even while praising Cmdr. Scott D.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Three corporate executives are under consideration to lead the Air Force, Army and Navy, administration officials said Saturday. The three have been interviewed by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, and the White House was expected to announce this week that it will send their names to the Senate for confirmation, the Washington Times reported, quoting unidentified sources. Gordon R. England, 63, who retired recently from General Dynamics Corp., would be nominated as Navy secretary; James G.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | Associated Press
After three years and $143 million, the National Guard has no anti-terrorism teams ready to respond to nuclear, chemical or biological attacks because of defective safety equipment and poor training, an internal Pentagon review found. The Pentagon inspector general report said preparedness is so bad that Guard members at one point were given mobile labs with air filters installed backward and gas masks with incompatible parts.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third day in a row, President Bush on Wednesday went to a military installation to praise the armed forces and extol his plans to improve their lot. His audience on the final day of his tour of military bases was 1,200 reservists and National Guard members. And the message was that their service will become more important and their missions will be chosen more carefully.
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