Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Armed Forces
IN THE NEWS

United States Armed Forces

NEWS
January 12, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Depleted uranium may or may not be a danger to life and health, but for the U.S.-led NATO alliance, fallout from mounting controversy over the American munitions that contain it is proving extremely noxious. "The hysteria and panic on this has become unbelievable," a NATO official said this week, shaking his head in dismay. For the incoming Bush administration, the dispute has arguably become the most urgent issue it will have to tackle with its European allies.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 15, 2000 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush is unlikely to seek major new initiatives in defense spending, but instead focus on targeted increases to replace aging fighter planes, warships and weaponry, analysts said. Although Bush talks tough on defense, his failure to obtain a decisive victory in the election and the evenly divided political power in Congress are likely to restrain any big ambition to strengthen U.S. military posture.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two ex-GIs who handled radio and message traffic told Pentagon investigators that American troops had orders from higher headquarters to fire on civilian refugees at No Gun Ri in the early days of the Korean War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Cold War had turned hot and the U.S. had gone to war with the Soviet Union, Ramon Rodriguez knew his marching orders. Rodriguez would have parachuted into Russia with a 12-man Special Forces team to train a guerrilla army. Quite a mission for a one-time teenage criminal who enlisted in the Army only to avoid going to prison. "The drop area is still classified.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. military chiefs warned Congress that America's defense spending must be quickly increased to replace aging Cold War weapons and bolster a slumping ability to fight and win two major wars at once. "We must find the resources necessary to modernize the force" of the world's only remaining superpower, Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, courting a major veterans' group his Republican rival addressed the day before, said Tuesday that he would back a military pay raise to keep the U.S. military the "best-trained, best-equipped, best-led fighting force in the entire world, bar none." Gore, who ended a four-day riverboat trip down the Mississippi on Monday, took pains to counter rival George W. Bush's portrayals of a U.S. military in disrepair.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
It looks like the big recruiting push at the Pentagon is beginning to pay off, with thousands more men and women reported signing up for military service this year. For the first time since 1997, all four services are expected to meet their enlistment goals this year, officials said Monday, crediting an unprecedented ad campaign, more creative use of the Internet, more recruiters and a host of incentives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge and retired from the Army shortly afterward is set to receive 10 medals and badges today, 55 years later. Not bad for a guy who left the military because his feet had frozen. John Medellin, now 77, fought in some of the final battles of World War II as an infantryman in the 26th Regiment of the 1st Division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge and was discharged from the Army a few months later is set to receive 10 medals and badges today, 55 years after he earned them. Oversight and backlog are responsible for the long delay, but a persistent son-in-law and a helpful congressman at last secured the Quartz Hill man his overdue recognition. John Medellin, 77, fought in some of the final battles of World War II as an infantryman in the 26th Regiment of the 1st Division.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. and South Korean officials said Friday that they have no intention of withdrawing any of the 37,000 American troops stationed on the divided Korean peninsula, despite the improved prospects for lasting peace in the region. But in a sign of the continued thaw on the world's last major Cold War frontier, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright hinted that she may meet with North Korea's foreign minister at an Asia security conference next month.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|