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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is moving toward asking Congress to rewrite the Endangered Species Act and other laws so military training exercises can be exempted from restrictions to protect sea turtles, desert tortoises, shorebirds and other rare creatures. Military officials have said they would like more flexibility in environmental rules, in large part because of growing friction between those protections and training exercises on California's military bases, including Camp Pendleton, Ft.
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NEWS
August 18, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Friday that he is seeking to shape a smaller, more nimble military that's capable of winning a major war "decisively" while still fighting smaller conflicts around the world. Speaking to reporters just six weeks before a comprehensive reassessment of the armed forces is to be sent to Congress, Rumsfeld said the U.S. military has been "living a lie" under its decade-old operating strategy of being prepared to fight two major wars at once.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire officials prepared Wednesday to ask for military reinforcements as weary firefighting crews battled dozens of large blazes across the West, marking the escalation of the fire season to a state of highest urgency. That designation means firefighting resources, ranging from work crews wielding pickaxes to water-dropping helicopters, have been stretched dangerously thin.
NEWS
July 30, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young girl during World War II, Gail Buckley tended to the radishes in her victory garden, learned the hymn of every branch of the U.S. armed forces and dreamed of being a hero. But despite growing up in the relative privilege of Hollywood as the daughter of singer Lena Horne, she soon learned that black patriots were rarely recognized in America.
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
The United States needs a $32.6-billion increase in defense spending to improve training, readiness and quality of life for U.S. troops, President Bush said Saturday. "For too many years, our strength has dwindled," he said. In his weekly radio address, Bush said the increase he is seeking for the Defense Department is sorely needed.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-level advisory panel is urging the Pentagon to begin a sweeping transformation of the military by creating joint-service strike forces that could gain a foothold in international trouble spots in a single day. A report written for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and released Tuesday called for these "global joint response forces" to deploy air armadas, missiles, naval forces and other troops to gain control of war zones within four days.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presidents have marked the day standing atop the cliffs of Normandy. They have visited the cemeteries in northern France where the soldiers lie buried, and they have walked the once-bloody beaches. On Wednesday, 57 years after D-day, President Bush turned to the little town on the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains that bore the greatest American burden.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's plan to overhaul the military is shaping up as a gradual and protracted effort, rather than the kind of explosive change that many had come to expect, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told lawmakers Wednesday during closed-door briefings. Rumsfeld is still aiming to bring major reform, as President Bush promised during his presidential campaign.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the key panels reviewing military strategy for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld are shying away from the kind of radical reform of the Pentagon that observers had anticipated. The study groups, which were organized at the beginning of the year and have been reporting back in recent weeks, were widely expected to urge elimination of some major weapon programs to pay for a sweeping transformation of the military.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century, the essential gear for the front-line infantry soldier has been a rifle, boots, canteen and helmet. Soon, it may also include a hand-held computer linked to satellites. U.S. military officials believe the system, developed by engineers at TRW Inc.'s research laboratory in Carson, could alter the way wars are fought by giving soldiers unprecedented access to battlefield information.
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