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United States Armes Sales Iran

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January 7, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Two full years after the Iran-Contra scandal burst into public view, top Reagan Administration officials gathered at the White House four days before Christmas for a meeting that will go down in history as a crucial turning point in the criminal prosecution of the star defendant, retired Lt. Col. Oliver L. North. It was then that key members of President Reagan's inner circle--including Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and CIA Director William H.
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NEWS
January 7, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Two full years after the Iran-Contra scandal burst into public view, top Reagan Administration officials gathered at the White House four days before Christmas for a meeting that will go down in history as a crucial turning point in the criminal prosecution of the star defendant, retired Lt. Col. Oliver L. North. It was then that key members of President Reagan's inner circle--including Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and CIA Director William H.
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NEWS
January 6, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, facing intelligence agency objections to his use of highly classified information, moved Thursday to drop the two central charges of conspiracy and theft against Oliver L. North in the Iran-Contra case.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, facing intelligence agency objections to his use of highly classified information, moved Thursday to drop the two central charges of conspiracy and theft against Oliver L. North in the Iran-Contra case.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
A shadowy and scandal-plagued Army intelligence unit--code-named Yellow Fruit--secretly opened a numbered Swiss bank account that may have been used as a conduit for funds to aid Nicaragua's rebels, a Pentagon official said Tuesday. The official said the bank account at Credit Suisse in Geneva was unauthorized by the Defense Department and the Army command, which did not even know that it existed until last month, when CBS News supplied the Pentagon with the account number.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
If this story turns out to be true, it would be the most diabolical intrigue of the century: a secret deal in 1980 between Ronald Reagan, George Bush and Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to keep 52 American hostages imprisoned in Tehran until that year's election day, thus sealing Reagan's march to the White House. And that isn't all.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
If this story turns out to be true, it would be the most diabolical intrigue of the century: a secret deal in 1980 between Ronald Reagan, George Bush and Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to keep 52 American hostages imprisoned in Tehran until that year's election day, thus sealing Reagan's march to the White House. And that isn't all.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
A shadowy and scandal-plagued Army intelligence unit--code-named Yellow Fruit--secretly opened a numbered Swiss bank account that may have been used as a conduit for funds to aid Nicaragua's rebels, a Pentagon official said Tuesday. The official said the bank account at Credit Suisse in Geneva was unauthorized by the Defense Department and the Army command, which did not even know that it existed until last month, when CBS News supplied the Pentagon with the account number.
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