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United States Arms Control

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August 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has backed away from a promise made by the Clinton White House that the United States will eventually comply with an international treaty banning land mines, because it believes U.S. forces may need to use the weapon, official correspondence indicates. In a letter to Rep. James P. McGovern (D-Mass.
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NEWS
August 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has backed away from a promise made by the Clinton White House that the United States will eventually comply with an international treaty banning land mines, because it believes U.S. forces may need to use the weapon, official correspondence indicates. In a letter to Rep. James P. McGovern (D-Mass.
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April 21, 1985 | ART SEIDENBAUM, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
The Soviets would sit with Americans in Washington while the Americans would meet with Soviets in Moscow, two ongoing exercises in what author William L. Ury calls joint crisis control. The aspiration: to prevent superpower war started by accident, terrorism, mistake, runaway escalation, misperception.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strongly worded speech, Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Tuesday called on China to live up to its claim that it is a responsible world power, maintaining that Beijing "sends quite the opposite message" when it threatens Taiwan and exports nuclear technology. While defending the Clinton administration's policy of constructive engagement toward China, the defense secretary warned that "we are not committed to engagement at any price." His speech to a symposium on U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1986 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter is the director of European studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies at Georgetown
When every other argument is exhausted, diehard opponents of arms control take refuge in the slough of verification. Whatever the other merits of a treaty, they will fault it because of our inability to know perfectly what the Soviet Union is up to. Our military leaders say that it's enough to know what we must know in time to respond, but arms control's opponents demand perfection. And if one minor instance of cheating shows up, so much the better to compromise the entire treaty.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Senate set to begin a long-awaited debate on the comprehensive nuclear test-ban treaty today, widespread predictions that the pact is headed for defeat have focused attention on a key question: Would that set off a new global arms race? Treaty proponents, led by the White House, have warned that a defeat could quickly create a Wild West atmosphere worldwide--with nukes instead of six-shooters.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since 1972, the Senate opened debate Tuesday on a new U.S. nuclear arms control agreement with the Soviet Union, with supporters calling the pact banning land-based medium-range weapons the most scrutinized treaty in American history. The debate, expected to be one-sided, began with President Reagan only a week away from his departure for Moscow and his fourth summit with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who arrived here Tuesday for four days of negotiations with Soviet leaders on arms control issues, will find the bargaining tougher than the United States has come to expect from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Kremlin officials warned.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The United States and the Soviet Union launch a new beginning here Tuesday in the permanent search for nuclear understanding, but the arms race may already now be passing a point of no return beyond which neither side will any longer have the political will or readiness to agree on new limits or controls. In the six years since the last arms control agreement was signed in Vienna by Presidents Jimmy Carter and Leonid I.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2002 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine 12,000 pounds of bomb-grade plutonium, some of the most dangerous stuff on Earth, barreling down Interstate 20 in heavily fortified trucks. Dozens of state troopers stand in the way, their squad cars barricading the highway. The governor of South Carolina lies in the road, in his signature seersucker suit, daring the feds to cross the state line. It's an absurd scenario. But it could come down to that.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | DAVID WILLMAN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A landmark 1993 agreement to sell tons of uranium stripped from Russian warheads to fuel American power plants is in jeopardy because of a dispute over price between the Russians and a U.S. company. The standoff between the Russians and the U.S. company responsible for carrying out the deal already has stalled shipment of uranium to the United States.
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