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United States Arms Sales

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NEWS
March 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In the face of a widening revolt against deadly assault weapons, the nation's largest manufacturer of such rifles, Colt Industries, announced Wednesday that it will suspend commercial sales of its semiautomatic AR-15 rifle until the Bush Administration can decide whether the weapon should be outlawed. The voluntary move was made as a gesture of support for the Administration decision Tuesday to temporarily bar imports of foreign-made military-type weapons.
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NEWS
June 7, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the U.S. defense budget practically in free fall, the American arms industry is pursuing the strategy that worked so well for the cigarette companies when sales fell at home: It is increasingly looking overseas to peddle its wares. But weapon makers, unlike cigarette manufacturers, need government approval before they can sell so much as a rifle to a foreign buyer.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending months of suspense, Israel announced Thursday that it will buy 20 F-15E fighters from McDonnell Douglas Corp. for $2 billion instead of acquiring Lockheed Corp.'s F-16. "This is a great day for McDonnell Douglas and the F-15 program," said John P. Capellupo, McDonnell's executive vice president. The Israeli order was a major blow to Calabasas-based Lockheed, which had lobbied hard to sell Israel 42 of its F-16 fighters. Lockheed Chairman Daniel M.
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside calls for a U.S.-led effort to dampen the international weapons trade, President Clinton approved a post-Cold War policy Friday that reaffirms Washington's traditional position that arms sales are a legitimate instrument of foreign policy.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sending a strong, dunning message to several Arab allies, the Senate voted 98 to 1 on Tuesday to ban arms sales to nations that fail to make good on multibillion-dollar pledges to defray costs incurred by the United States in the Persian Gulf War. The extraordinary prohibition was included in an Operation Desert Storm money bill that authorizes expenditures of $42.6 billion, most of which is supposed to be financed by allied contributions.
NEWS
April 10, 1988
Worldwide arms sales may have peaked, according to figures released by the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, but the new pattern of the weapons market shows some new and energetic players, including China, Brazil and Israel. The annual report on world military expenditures and arms transfers showed a sharp drop in 1985 and 1986, the most recent years available, from 1984. The world total of arms imports in 1984 was about $50 billion, the report said. By 1986 it had dropped to $34.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From United Press International
President Bush on Tuesday signed post-Iran-Contra legislation banning U.S. foreign aid and commercial arms sales to countries supporting international terrorism. The State Department has specified states supporting terrorism as Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, South Yemen and Syria. In a written statement, Bush said he wished "to re-emphasize this nation's strong determination to oppose international terrorists and the states that support them."
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global military spending and arms trading fell significantly in 1990 despite the buildup to the Gulf War, and the United States replaced the Soviet Union as the main exporter, taking 40% of the market, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said in its 1991 yearbook. Total world military spending fell in real terms by 5% to $950 billion in 1990, compared with a 2% decline in 1989, the institute said. Global trade in conventional arms fell 35%.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon's latest effort to unscramble its tangled foreign military sales accounts has been a $40-million failure, the House Government Operations Committee said Tuesday. It said a costly new computer system for straightening out the botched program was two years behind schedule, had thousands of unresolved problems and ultimately could cost $75 million without performing well.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a victory for the defense industry, the Clinton Administration is preparing to adopt policy guidelines that would factor the financial health of U.S. weapon makers and the shape of the domestic economy into decisions on foreign arms sales, Administration officials said Monday. Arms sales abroad require government approval, and historically those decisions have been judged by whether the sale enhances U.S. security, regional stability and international cooperation.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending months of suspense, Israel announced Thursday that it will buy 20 F-15E fighters from McDonnell Douglas Corp. for $2 billion instead of acquiring Lockheed Corp.'s F-16. "This is a great day for McDonnell Douglas and the F-15 program," said John P. Capellupo, McDonnell's executive vice president. The Israeli order was a major blow to Calabasas-based Lockheed, which had lobbied hard to sell Israel 42 of its F-16 fighters. Lockheed Chairman Daniel M.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global military spending and arms trading fell significantly in 1990 despite the buildup to the Gulf War, and the United States replaced the Soviet Union as the main exporter, taking 40% of the market, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said in its 1991 yearbook. Total world military spending fell in real terms by 5% to $950 billion in 1990, compared with a 2% decline in 1989, the institute said. Global trade in conventional arms fell 35%.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sending a strong, dunning message to several Arab allies, the Senate voted 98 to 1 on Tuesday to ban arms sales to nations that fail to make good on multibillion-dollar pledges to defray costs incurred by the United States in the Persian Gulf War. The extraordinary prohibition was included in an Operation Desert Storm money bill that authorizes expenditures of $42.6 billion, most of which is supposed to be financed by allied contributions.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From United Press International
President Bush on Tuesday signed post-Iran-Contra legislation banning U.S. foreign aid and commercial arms sales to countries supporting international terrorism. The State Department has specified states supporting terrorism as Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, South Yemen and Syria. In a written statement, Bush said he wished "to re-emphasize this nation's strong determination to oppose international terrorists and the states that support them."
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In the face of a widening revolt against deadly assault weapons, the nation's largest manufacturer of such rifles, Colt Industries, announced Wednesday that it will suspend commercial sales of its semiautomatic AR-15 rifle until the Bush Administration can decide whether the weapon should be outlawed. The voluntary move was made as a gesture of support for the Administration decision Tuesday to temporarily bar imports of foreign-made military-type weapons.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon's latest effort to unscramble its tangled foreign military sales accounts has been a $40-million failure, the House Government Operations Committee said Tuesday. It said a costly new computer system for straightening out the botched program was two years behind schedule, had thousands of unresolved problems and ultimately could cost $75 million without performing well.
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