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United States Arms Sales Afghanistan

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November 5, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union's suspension of its retreat from Afghanistan appears to be intended to remind increasingly successful Islamic guerrillas that even if they oust the Marxist government in Kabul, they can never escape the reach of Soviet power, a Reagan Administration official said Friday. The official said the message to the moujahedeen insurgents appears to be: "Remember, we're your neighbors, and we can bring the Backfires (bombers) in any time we want to."
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NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan will not return Stinger missile launchers supplied by the United States to anti-Soviet rebels during the Afghan war, Afghanistan's prime minister said Thursday. Washington wants to buy back the antiaircraft weapons to keep them from falling into the hands of terrorists. "The Afghan government does not intend to allow even a round of ammunition to be taken out of Afghanistan," Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar told reporters in the Iranian capital, Tehran.
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NEWS
October 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Iran may have obtained a small number of American-made Stinger anti-aircraft missiles by taking them away from a U.S.-backed group of Afghan guerrillas earlier this year, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said in an interview Wednesday. Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards might have seized some of the shoulder-fired missiles after a truck convoy broke down near the Iran-Afghanistan border, Weinberger told the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Partly in response to growing fears of terrorist attacks on American civilian aircraft, the CIA this month requested $55 million to buy back hundreds of the highly efficient Stinger antiaircraft missiles that the United States gave to Afghan rebels in the 1980s, according to informed U.S. sources.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to reduce the level of violence as the Afghan civil war moves into its final hours, the United States and Russia are trying to get back some of the weapons--worth billions of dollars--that Washington and the former Soviet Union poured into the country during more than a decade of conflict.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union announced Friday that it is suspending the withdrawal of its forces from Afghanistan because of the worsening military situation there. Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, a first deputy foreign minister, said in a statement that Moscow still intends to complete the withdrawal by Feb. 15, but he left open the possibility that Soviet troops might remain longer. "The withdrawal of troops is being suspended for the time being," Bessmertnykh said.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Partly in response to growing fears of terrorist attacks on American civilian aircraft, the CIA this month requested $55 million to buy back hundreds of the highly efficient Stinger antiaircraft missiles that the United States gave to Afghan rebels in the 1980s, according to informed U.S. sources.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan will not return Stinger missile launchers supplied by the United States to anti-Soviet rebels during the Afghan war, Afghanistan's prime minister said Thursday. Washington wants to buy back the antiaircraft weapons to keep them from falling into the hands of terrorists. "The Afghan government does not intend to allow even a round of ammunition to be taken out of Afghanistan," Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar told reporters in the Iranian capital, Tehran.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to reduce the level of violence as the Afghan civil war moves into its final hours, the United States and Russia are trying to get back some of the weapons--worth billions of dollars--that Washington and the former Soviet Union poured into the country during more than a decade of conflict.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union's suspension of its retreat from Afghanistan appears to be intended to remind increasingly successful Islamic guerrillas that even if they oust the Marxist government in Kabul, they can never escape the reach of Soviet power, a Reagan Administration official said Friday. The official said the message to the moujahedeen insurgents appears to be: "Remember, we're your neighbors, and we can bring the Backfires (bombers) in any time we want to."
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union announced Friday that it is suspending the withdrawal of its forces from Afghanistan because of the worsening military situation there. Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, a first deputy foreign minister, said in a statement that Moscow still intends to complete the withdrawal by Feb. 15, but he left open the possibility that Soviet troops might remain longer. "The withdrawal of troops is being suspended for the time being," Bessmertnykh said.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Iran may have obtained a small number of American-made Stinger anti-aircraft missiles by taking them away from a U.S.-backed group of Afghan guerrillas earlier this year, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said in an interview Wednesday. Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards might have seized some of the shoulder-fired missiles after a truck convoy broke down near the Iran-Afghanistan border, Weinberger told the Wall Street Journal.
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